Discussion:
NYE Dinner.
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Jeßus
2021-12-31 19:27:11 UTC
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Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.

Pic not ideal but anyway: Loading Image...

I was great to see nobody gave a shit about the covid restrictions we
have here. I'm not even supposed to be allowed to enter the building,
as I am unvaccinated (they are supposed to check everyone at the
door). No masks worn, at all either (another legal requirement).
People even stood next to each other! <gasp>.
GM
2021-12-31 19:36:49 UTC
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Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
Looks good... 'Reef and Beef' here would be "Surf 'n Turf"...
Post by Jeßus
I was great to see nobody gave a shit about the covid restrictions we
have here. I'm not even supposed to be allowed to enter the building,
as I am unvaccinated (they are supposed to check everyone at the
door). No masks worn, at all either (another legal requirement).
People even stood next to each other! <gasp>.
Yeah, the US libtard media is ginning up the Wuhan Flu hysteria again...

<sigh>

ANYWAYS, Happy New Year to you and yours... may COMMON SENSE return in 2022...!!!

We are getting our first Chicago - area winter blizzard tomorrow. Looking forward to it...!!!

[ and FUCK all that "climate change" manufactured hysteria, too...!!! ;-D ]
--
GM
Jeßus
2021-12-31 20:29:04 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 11:36:49 -0800 (PST), GM
Post by GM
Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
Looks good... 'Reef and Beef' here would be "Surf 'n Turf"...
Yeah, they also call it 'surf and turf' here too, probably more
commonly used than reef and beef.
Post by GM
Post by Jeßus
I was great to see nobody gave a shit about the covid restrictions we
have here. I'm not even supposed to be allowed to enter the building,
as I am unvaccinated (they are supposed to check everyone at the
door). No masks worn, at all either (another legal requirement).
People even stood next to each other! <gasp>.
Yeah, the US libtard media is ginning up the Wuhan Flu hysteria again...
<sigh>
Same as most everywhere else.
Post by GM
ANYWAYS, Happy New Year to you and yours... may COMMON SENSE return in 2022...!!!
We are getting our first Chicago - area winter blizzard tomorrow. Looking forward to it...!!!
[ and FUCK all that "climate change" manufactured hysteria, too...!!! ;-D ]
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 02:33:25 UTC
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Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
GM
2022-01-01 02:39:55 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I'm doing a "staycation" at a local hotel, I'm on the 12th floor looking towards Lake Michigan,
a good vantage point for the SNOW STORM and the SUB - ZERO temps due our way in the
Midwest tomorrow... up to 8+ inches and HIGH WINDS...

Can't wait to see it...!!!

We've had virtually no snow this season...
--
GM
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 19:44:22 UTC
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Post by GM
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I'm doing a "staycation" at a local hotel, I'm on the 12th floor looking towards Lake Michigan,
a good vantage point for the SNOW STORM and the SUB - ZERO temps due our way in the
Midwest tomorrow... up to 8+ inches and HIGH WINDS...
You didn't book at room at the Warwick Allerton?? ;)
Post by GM
Can't wait to see it...!!!
We've had virtually no snow this season...
Same here... a few slight flurries, but nothing stuck. I hope it stays
that way. Y'all can keep all of the wet, cold fluffy crap over in
Chicago. I'll take 75 and sunny, please!
Michael Trew
2022-01-02 02:45:15 UTC
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Post by GM
We've had virtually no snow this season...
Same here... a few slight flurries, but nothing stuck. I hope it stays
that way. Y'all can keep all of the wet, cold fluffy crap over in
Chicago. I'll take 75 and sunny, please!
A snowstorm is a lovely thing...
OK, I'll relent... a little. We can have one good snow storm per year,
preferably on Christmas. Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow...

...Then for God's sakes, please let it melt tomorrow, and warm, sunny,
and 75-80 the rest of the year! :)
Bruce
2022-01-03 01:31:45 UTC
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On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 17:03:43 -0800 (PST), Geoff Rove
Post by Michael Trew
Post by GM
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I'm doing a "staycation" at a local hotel, I'm on the 12th floor looking towards Lake Michigan,
a good vantage point for the SNOW STORM and the SUB - ZERO temps due our way in the
Midwest tomorrow... up to 8+ inches and HIGH WINDS...
You didn't book at room at the Warwick Allerton?? ;)
Nope, safe in the suburbs...
Oak Brook mall waiting for swat clearance????
Post by Michael Trew
Post by GM
Can't wait to see it...!!!
We've had virtually no snow this season...
Same here... a few slight flurries, but nothing stuck. I hope it stays
that way. Y'all can keep all of the wet, cold fluffy crap over in
Chicago. I'll take 75 and sunny, please!
A snowstorm is a lovely thing...
--
GM
Ghe
Jeßus
2022-01-01 02:59:01 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:33:25 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
Dave Smith
2022-01-01 03:05:22 UTC
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Post by Jeßus
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:33:25 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.

Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
i***@webtv.net
2022-01-01 05:06:04 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
It was 70° here today and has been warm all week. But Monday the
high is predicted to be about 37°.
Ed Pawlowski
2022-01-01 05:22:20 UTC
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Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
It was 70° here today and has been warm all week. But Monday the
high is predicted to be about 37°.
My AC is running right now. Cold spell is coming with highs in the low
70s.

Had dinner tonight with daughter and son-in-law. First restaurant was
not crowded but short staffed kitchen with to-go orders so an hour wait.
Half mile away another place we were seated right away. Good
margarita too!
jmcquown
2022-01-01 16:08:46 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
It was 70° here today and has been warm all week.  But Monday the
high is predicted to be about 37°.
My AC is running right now.  Cold spell is coming with highs in the low
70s.
I've had to turn on the AC, too. It's supposed to be about 78F here today.
Had dinner tonight with daughter and son-in-law.  First restaurant was
not crowded but short staffed kitchen with to-go orders so an hour wait.
 Half mile away another place we were seated right away.  Good
margarita too!
Glad you found a place with not such a long wait and enjoyed the
margarita. :)

Jill
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 19:47:30 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
It was 70° here today and has been warm all week. But Monday the
high is predicted to be about 37°.
My AC is running right now. Cold spell is coming with highs in the low 70s.
Hmm... can I come visit? LOL
Had dinner tonight with daughter and son-in-law. First restaurant was
not crowded but short staffed kitchen with to-go orders so an hour wait.
Half mile away another place we were seated right away. Good margarita too!
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-01 16:03:06 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:05:22 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:33:25 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
Most of the winters never get nearly that cold. We occasionally drop
to -30ºF where I live in the northern Catskills.
The Peg is a wonderful city that has everything to buy that you can
imagine, It's where I bought my first electric meat grinder at a giant
cooking supply emporium. Even though it gets cold during winter one
doesn't need to go outdoors to travel the city, there are many below
ground tunnels and above ground glass enclosed walkways connecting the
buildings in the business districts, and also lots of public
tranportation including double decker buses. Winipeg was the main
business hub during the time of the fur traders and continues to be a
major business hub today. The Peg contains many museums and art
galleries, has a fantastic planetarium, many parks and arbortoriums,
and paddle wheel boats on the River Rouge for dinner cruises... the
Red River seperates the English speaking communities from those that
speak French with many confectionary plants.
You missed out by not touring the city... the Museum of Man is well
worth spending a day or two touring, it even houses a functioning
replica of Henry Hudson's ship, the Half Moon, that I was able to
board and tour.
Loading Image...&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.halfmoon.mus.ny.us%2Flivinghistory.htm&size=215KB&name=Half+Moon+Voyage+of+Discovery&oid=2&h=396&w=576&turl=https%3A%2F%2Ftse1.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.o4y2AnMk5edqAuG4qK4lhQHaFF%26pid%3DApi%26rs%3D1%26c%3D1%26qlt%3D95%26w%3D176%26h%3D121&tt=Half+Moon+Voyage+of+Discovery&sigr=yhDBl39x.cAv&sigit=80LYyb8oGGIO&sigi=ES6XQUyPrRzN&sign=hiykddtgjAnW&sigt=hiykddtgjAnW&s_it=img-ans
Hank Rogers
2022-01-01 19:13:36 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:05:22 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:33:25 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
Most of the winters never get nearly that cold. We occasionally drop
to -30ºF where I live in the northern Catskills.
The Peg is a wonderful city that has everything to buy that you can
imagine, It's where I bought my first electric meat grinder at a giant
cooking supply emporium. Even though it gets cold during winter one
doesn't need to go outdoors to travel the city, there are many below
ground tunnels and above ground glass enclosed walkways connecting the
buildings in the business districts, and also lots of public
tranportation including double decker buses. Winipeg was the main
business hub during the time of the fur traders and continues to be a
major business hub today. The Peg contains many museums and art
galleries, has a fantastic planetarium, many parks and arbortoriums,
and paddle wheel boats on the River Rouge for dinner cruises... the
Red River seperates the English speaking communities from those that
speak French with many confectionary plants.
You missed out by not touring the city... the Museum of Man is well
worth spending a day or two touring, it even houses a functioning
replica of Henry Hudson's ship, the Half Moon, that I was able to
board and tour.
https://search.aol.com/aol/image;_ylt=AwrJ6yt_c9BhxjQAzxBpCWVH;_ylu=Y29sbwNiZjEEcG9zAzMEdnRpZAMEc2VjA3Nj?q=henry+hudson%27s+ship%2C+the+half+moon+and+the+museum+of+man&v_t=loki-keyword&ei=UTF-8&fr=loki-keyword&th=121.1&tw=176.6&imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.halfmoon.mus.ny.us%2Fclevandmedium.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.halfmoon.mus.ny.us%2Flivinghistory.htm&size=215KB&name=Half+Moon+Voyage+of+Discovery&oid=2&h=396&w=576&turl=https%3A%2F%2Ftse1.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.o4y2AnMk5edqAuG4qK4lhQHaFF%26pid%3DApi%26rs%3D1%26c%3D1%26qlt%3D95%26w%3D176%26h%3D121&tt=Half+Moon+Voyage+of+Discovery&sigr=yhDBl39x.cAv&sigit=80LYyb8oGGIO&sigi=ES6XQUyPrRzN&sign=hiykddtgjAnW&sigt=hiykddtgjAnW&s_it=img-ans
Popeye, I bet yoose had lots of sexual exploits in the peg.
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 19:46:42 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:33:25 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh.
That is all a matter of opinion. I bet that compared with what I'm used
to, I'd consider your winters absolute hell ;)

For reference, I get cranky when it gets down to 50F degrees, and I only
leave the house when absolutely necessary if it's below 30. Below 0 is
extremely rare here, and I'm rather certain that I'd call off work. I
highly doubt my car would start in that weather.
Post by Dave Smith
Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
Bruce
2022-01-01 21:11:48 UTC
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On Sat, 01 Jan 2022 14:46:42 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:33:25 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh.
That is all a matter of opinion. I bet that compared with what I'm used
to, I'd consider your winters absolute hell ;)
For reference, I get cranky when it gets down to 50F degrees
Other people just turn on the heating.
Jeßus
2022-01-02 00:54:46 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:05:22 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:33:25 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Nor I. So many practical problems, never mind the discomfort.
Post by Dave Smith
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
I don't blame you.
Bruce
2022-01-02 01:33:55 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:05:22 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:33:25 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
I like our winters here in Tasmania, but Nth America/Europe winters
are a bit much for me.
North America is a big place and winter varies a lot. I am in the very
south of Canada and winters are not terribly harsh. Further north is a
different story. I could not handle living in a place where -30-49 C
winter temperatures are common.
Nor I. So many practical problems, never mind the discomfort.
Post by Dave Smith
Many years ago I went out to Winnipeg in December to look for work. It
was -40 when I arrived. People told me it did not usually get that cold
until later in winter. My response was that I did not want to live in a
place that ever got that cold.
I don't blame you.
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-01 13:45:15 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 19:54:00 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-01 20:13:13 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2022-01-02 02:48:19 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.

Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
Bruce
2022-01-02 02:51:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 01 Jan 2022 21:48:19 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-02 17:41:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
We never open windows, we don't need the house filled with pollen.
Fresh air is a myth, outside air is always polluted. We got rid of
window screens years ago, I hate having to look through screens,
especially when they are covered with pollen and spider webs. We keep
the indoor temperature set to 70ºF all year. We have our central air
fitted with an AprilAir filtration system, it does a good job
filtering particulates but it still can't filter automobile emissions.
When it's not calling for Cool the blower switches to Low so it's
still filtering all winter. And the filtration system includes two UV
lamps for killing bacteria and viruses. We have UV lamps for our well
water too. UV lamps is something people should employ with the Covid
virus. With central air its an easy addition when the unit is
serviced, just as easy for one's water and something one can add
themself, needed for city water too, Amazon sells the units.
https://www.hatenboer-water.com/uv-water-disinfection/
Ed Pawlowski
2022-01-02 17:50:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
We never open windows, we don't need the house filled with pollen.
Fresh air is a myth, outside air is always polluted. We got rid of
window screens years ago, I hate having to look through screens,
especially when they are covered with pollen and spider webs. We keep
the indoor temperature set to 70ºF all year.
Pretty much agree with that. I do open windows half dozen days a year
when the air is clear.

We've always used a dryer too. I see no reason to hang clean clothing
out to collect pollen and debris from the air. Just wash your car and
then take a look at the caoting on it a half hour later.
Jeßus
2022-01-02 17:52:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
We never open windows, we don't need the house filled with pollen.
Fresh air is a myth, outside air is always polluted.
LOL.
Post by Sheldon Martin
We got rid of
window screens years ago, I hate having to look through screens,
LOL...
Post by Sheldon Martin
especially when they are covered with pollen and spider webs. We keep
the indoor temperature set to 70ºF all year. We have our central air
fitted with an AprilAir filtration system, it does a good job
filtering particulates but it still can't filter automobile emissions.
When it's not calling for Cool the blower switches to Low so it's
still filtering all winter. And the filtration system includes two UV
lamps for killing bacteria and viruses. We have UV lamps for our well
water too. UV lamps is something people should employ with the Covid
virus.
LOL... wow.
Post by Sheldon Martin
With central air its an easy addition when the unit is
serviced, just as easy for one's water and something one can add
themself, needed for city water too, Amazon sells the units.
https://www.hatenboer-water.com/uv-water-disinfection/
Really, you're just a fag. What a pussy. And misinformed at the same
time.
Hank Rogers
2022-01-02 20:22:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
We never open windows, we don't need the house filled with pollen.
Fresh air is a myth, outside air is always polluted. We got rid of
window screens years ago, I hate having to look through screens,
especially when they are covered with pollen and spider webs. We keep
the indoor temperature set to 70ºF all year. We have our central air
fitted with an AprilAir filtration system, it does a good job
filtering particulates but it still can't filter automobile emissions.
When it's not calling for Cool the blower switches to Low so it's
still filtering all winter. And the filtration system includes two UV
lamps for killing bacteria and viruses. We have UV lamps for our well
water too. UV lamps is something people should employ with the Covid
virus. With central air its an easy addition when the unit is
serviced, just as easy for one's water and something one can add
themself, needed for city water too, Amazon sells the units.
https://www.hatenboer-water.com/uv-water-disinfection/
It's all the finest shit in the universe, Popeye.
Michael Trew
2022-01-02 23:59:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
We never open windows, we don't need the house filled with pollen.
Fresh air is a myth, outside air is always polluted. We got rid of
window screens years ago, I hate having to look through screens,
especially when they are covered with pollen and spider webs. We keep
the indoor temperature set to 70ºF all year. We have our central air
fitted with an AprilAir filtration system, it does a good job
filtering particulates but it still can't filter automobile emissions.
When it's not calling for Cool the blower switches to Low so it's
still filtering all winter. And the filtration system includes two UV
lamps for killing bacteria and viruses. We have UV lamps for our well
water too. UV lamps is something people should employ with the Covid
virus. With central air its an easy addition when the unit is
serviced, just as easy for one's water and something one can add
themself, needed for city water too, Amazon sells the units.
https://www.hatenboer-water.com/uv-water-disinfection/
I like to feel the breeze with windows open. A house can get stagnant
inside, especially with pets. I've never been to a dog persons house
that didn't reek (to some extent) of dog. I have one cat; that's
enough. I can still smell litter in the cellar, no matter how
frequently cleaned.

Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived. I'm fine drinking my
tap water, and opening my windows. I would never pay to install central
air, and he goes on when it's finally too cold. I have a radiator/hot
water boiler system; there's no moving air in my house. I hate forced
air furnaces; they dry out the air and your skin.
Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-03 09:53:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
No, they did not. Cholera from contaminated wells was a frequent
problem.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce
2022-01-03 10:08:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
No, they did not. Cholera from contaminated wells was a frequent
problem.
Michael has a very poorly informed view of the old days. Rose-coloured
glasses, but clueless as hell.
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-03 15:09:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
You'd rather pay the hospital bills?
Post by Bruce
Post by Cindy Hamilton
No, they did not. Cholera from contaminated wells was a frequent
problem.
Michael has a very poorly informed view of the old days. Rose-coloured
glasses, but clueless as hell.
Wells in agricultural areas are typically polluted from
animal/livestock droppings and chemicals used for growing crops.
When people pay extra for organic foods they are being fools, there's
no such thing as organic foods, in fact produce sold in the US as
organic are the least organic... when fruits and veggies look perfect
and with no insect damage it was sprayed with insecticides and
chemical fertilizers. When you see mountains of perfect apples at
market labeled organic and see no worm holes someone is lying. I use
no chemicals in my garden and I get worm holes and insect damage, I
trim those parts away and toss them over the garden fence, critters
eat them. Deer are not vegetarian, they eat a lot of insects with the
plants they eat.
Bruce
2022-01-03 16:18:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
You'd rather pay the hospital bills?
Post by Bruce
Post by Cindy Hamilton
No, they did not. Cholera from contaminated wells was a frequent
problem.
Michael has a very poorly informed view of the old days. Rose-coloured
glasses, but clueless as hell.
Wells in agricultural areas are typically polluted from
animal/livestock droppings and chemicals used for growing crops.
When people pay extra for organic foods they are being fools, there's
no such thing as organic foods, in fact produce sold in the US as
organic are the least organic... when fruits and veggies look perfect
and with no insect damage it was sprayed with insecticides and
chemical fertilizers. When you see mountains of perfect apples at
market labeled organic and see no worm holes someone is lying. I use
no chemicals in my garden and I get worm holes and insect damage, I
trim those parts away and toss them over the garden fence, critters
eat them. Deer are not vegetarian, they eat a lot of insects with the
plants they eat.
Yes ...The worlds farmers should log on to RFC and get the facts or at
the very least consult with the PoPeye.

Ghe ghe ghe
Michael Trew
2022-01-03 17:16:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Ah, I didn't know that.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
You'd rather pay the hospital bills?
We all drink the municipality spigot water. My parents and grandparents
did the same, and I'm not aware of anyone being hospitalized from it.
Their are regular water quality checks. Perhaps your well water isn't
up to snuff, but we have no issue here.
Bruce
2022-01-03 19:09:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 12:16:33 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Ah, I didn't know that.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
You'd rather pay the hospital bills?
We all drink the municipality spigot water. My parents and grandparents
did the same, and I'm not aware of anyone being hospitalized from it.
Their are regular water quality checks. Perhaps your well water isn't
up to snuff, but we have no issue here.
Those checks have been designed by scientists. Do you trust
scientists? They try to base their opinions on facts. Facts, I tell
you! Bloody communists is what they are. Put Fauci in jail!
This is my frogger.
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-03 19:50:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 12:16:33 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Ah, I didn't know that.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
You'd rather pay the hospital bills?
We all drink the municipality spigot water. My parents and grandparents
did the same, and I'm not aware of anyone being hospitalized from it.
Their are regular water quality checks. Perhaps your well water isn't
up to snuff, but we have no issue here.
I have two private wells, I have mine tested at a lab once a year. A
lot of people are too cheap to have their private well water tested,
only costs about $30. Cindy doesn't think her life is worth anything.
In fact it seems she'd rather ingest chemically sanitized water than
UV sanitized water. A UV system costs very little to buy and operate.
Even if I had municipal water I'd still have a UV lamp and have my
water tested at my own private lab... most contamination comes from
municipal water mains. There are still many old lead water mains and
people don't know that's what's buried out in the street. Every time
a heavy truck rumbles by loosened lead particles and bacteria colonies
drop into your drinking water. Our private well water is RO filtered
and treated with Ultra Violet. The lab tells us we have the purest
water around. The bottled water people buy at the market is not very
clean, considering it comes from some bottling plant hose bib.
There's a reason bottled water has an expiration date on it.
i***@webtv.net
2022-01-04 00:24:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Popeye, yoose have the finest water in the universe. I bet yoose
can see angels descending from heaven when yoose takes a swig.
*SNIGGER*
Bruce
2022-01-04 01:22:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Popeye, yoose have the finest water in the universe. I bet yoose
can see angels descending from heaven when yoose takes a swig.
*SNIGGER*
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Bruce
2022-01-04 01:19:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 12:16:33 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Ah, I didn't know that.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
You'd rather pay the hospital bills?
We all drink the municipality spigot water. My parents and grandparents
did the same, and I'm not aware of anyone being hospitalized from it.
Their are regular water quality checks. Perhaps your well water isn't
up to snuff, but we have no issue here.
I have two private wells, I have mine tested at a lab once a year. A
lot of people are too cheap to have their private well water tested,
only costs about $30. Cindy doesn't think her life is worth anything.
In fact it seems she'd rather ingest chemically sanitized water than
UV sanitized water. A UV system costs very little to buy and operate.
Even if I had municipal water I'd still have a UV lamp and have my
water tested at my own private lab... most contamination comes from
municipal water mains. There are still many old lead water mains and
people don't know that's what's buried out in the street. Every time
a heavy truck rumbles by loosened lead particles and bacteria colonies
drop into your drinking water. Our private well water is RO filtered
and treated with Ultra Violet. The lab tells us we have the purest
water around. The bottled water people buy at the market is not very
clean, considering it comes from some bottling plant hose bib.
Popeye, yoose have the finest water in the universe. I bet yoose
can see angels descending from heaven when yoose takes a swig.
This is not my frogger.
Michael Trew
2022-01-04 19:34:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 12:16:33 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Ah, I didn't know that.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
You'd rather pay the hospital bills?
We all drink the municipality spigot water. My parents and grandparents
did the same, and I'm not aware of anyone being hospitalized from it.
Their are regular water quality checks. Perhaps your well water isn't
up to snuff, but we have no issue here.
I have two private wells, I have mine tested at a lab once a year. A
lot of people are too cheap to have their private well water tested,
only costs about $30. Cindy doesn't think her life is worth anything.
In fact it seems she'd rather ingest chemically sanitized water than
UV sanitized water. A UV system costs very little to buy and operate.
Even if I had municipal water I'd still have a UV lamp and have my
water tested at my own private lab... most contamination comes from
municipal water mains. There are still many old lead water mains and
people don't know that's what's buried out in the street. Every time
a heavy truck rumbles by loosened lead particles and bacteria colonies
drop into your drinking water. Our private well water is RO filtered
and treated with Ultra Violet. The lab tells us we have the purest
water around. The bottled water people buy at the market is not very
clean, considering it comes from some bottling plant hose bib.
There's a reason bottled water has an expiration date on it.
I'm told that bottled water expires after 2 years due to water being in
contact with the plastic, but I can't prove that.

I'd consider your system if I were on a private well, as would I test my
well water, but I don't have a well. When using chlorinated
municipality water, it seems like over kill. I'm rather certain that
the chlorination kills bacteria. My grandparents had a water softener.
They didn't use salt, they used potassium to soften the water. I do
miss that system.

I have a solid lead water main in my house, as do many other 100+ year
old homes. I flush the toilet in the morning before anything else, then
flush the tap for a minute before drinking or using the water. ALWAYS
run the cold tap first, so the hot water tank doesn't absorb lead into
the water in the tank.
Bruce
2022-01-03 17:45:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
Michael has a very poorly informed view of the old days. Rose-coloured
glasses, but clueless as hell.
Wells in agricultural areas are typically polluted from
animal/livestock droppings and chemicals used for growing crops.
When people pay extra for organic foods they are being fools, there's
no such thing as organic foods, in fact produce sold in the US as
organic are the least organic... when fruits and veggies look perfect
and with no insect damage it was sprayed with insecticides and
chemical fertilizers. When you see mountains of perfect apples at
market labeled organic and see no worm holes someone is lying. I use
no chemicals in my garden and I get worm holes and insect damage, I
trim those parts away and toss them over the garden fence, critters
eat them. Deer are not vegetarian, they eat a lot of insects with the
plants they eat.
You're on repeat.
Bruce
2022-01-03 19:09:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
Michael has a very poorly informed view of the old days. Rose-coloured
glasses, but clueless as hell.
Wells in agricultural areas are typically polluted from
animal/livestock droppings and chemicals used for growing crops.
When people pay extra for organic foods they are being fools, there's
no such thing as organic foods, in fact produce sold in the US as
organic are the least organic... when fruits and veggies look perfect
and with no insect damage it was sprayed with insecticides and
chemical fertilizers. When you see mountains of perfect apples at
market labeled organic and see no worm holes someone is lying. I use
no chemicals in my garden and I get worm holes and insect damage, I
trim those parts away and toss them over the garden fence, critters
eat them. Deer are not vegetarian, they eat a lot of insects with the
plants they eat.
You're on repeat.
This is my frogger.
Bruce 1
2022-01-04 04:11:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:53:26 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Do you not trust the chlorination in the water from your municipality?
He doesn't have a municipality. He has a private well.
Post by Michael Trew
I'm too cheap for all of that UV stuff. They did without that stuff for
hundreds and thousands of years, and people lived.
You'd rather pay the hospital bills?
Post by Bruce
Post by Cindy Hamilton
No, they did not. Cholera from contaminated wells was a frequent
problem.
Michael has a very poorly informed view of the old days. Rose-coloured
glasses, but clueless as hell.
Wells in agricultural areas are typically polluted from
animal/livestock droppings and chemicals used for growing crops.
When people pay extra for organic foods they are being fools, there's
no such thing as organic foods, in fact produce sold in the US as
organic are the least organic... when fruits and veggies look perfect
and with no insect damage it was sprayed with insecticides and
chemical fertilizers. When you see mountains of perfect apples at
market labeled organic and see no worm holes someone is lying. I use
no chemicals in my garden and I get worm holes and insect damage, I
trim those parts away and toss them over the garden fence, critters
eat them. Deer are not vegetarian, they eat a lot of insects with the
plants they eat.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-02 17:55:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
So much for the advantages of hot-water radiator heat. All I have
to do to cool down the bedroom is close the vents.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce
2022-01-02 19:07:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
So much for the advantages of hot-water radiator heat. All I have
to do to cool down the bedroom is close the vents.
Cindy Hamilton
He could cut the radiation quite a bit by throwing a blanket over the
radiator.
Mixing cast iron and finned copper was a hack job by the previous owner
though. There are better ways, like the proper amount of cast iron
baseboard.
Ghe?
Michael Trew
2022-01-03 00:04:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
So much for the advantages of hot-water radiator heat. All I have
to do to cool down the bedroom is close the vents.
Cindy Hamilton
That is true. Unfortunately, my bedroom has a large radiator, and even
though I put a new shut-off valve on it, the shut off valve is usually
all or nothing. I have it turned down most of the way, but if I turn it
a bit more, it tends to stop ALL flow, and the room gets too cold. I
plan to move bedrooms around here soon, and my daughter will be getting
the warmer room. I'm taking the cooler room with panoramic (bay)
windows, which is storage now. The size of the southern facing windows
likely won't be cooler in the summertime, however.
Bruce
2022-01-03 00:55:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 19:04:27 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
So much for the advantages of hot-water radiator heat. All I have
to do to cool down the bedroom is close the vents.
Cindy Hamilton
That is true. Unfortunately, my bedroom has a large radiator, and even
though I put a new shut-off valve on it, the shut off valve is usually
all or nothing. I have it turned down most of the way, but if I turn it
a bit more, it tends to stop ALL flow, and the room gets too cold. I
plan to move bedrooms around here soon, and my daughter will be getting
the warmer room. I'm taking the cooler room with panoramic (bay)
windows, which is storage now. The size of the southern facing windows
likely won't be cooler in the summertime, however.
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Bruce
2022-01-03 01:31:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 01:03:08 +0000, S Viemeister
That is true.  Unfortunately, my bedroom has a large radiator, and even
though I put a new shut-off valve on it, the shut off valve is usually
all or nothing.  I have it turned down most of the way, but if I turn it
a bit more, it tends to stop ALL flow, and the room gets too cold.
When we replaced our boiler, we also installed thermostatic valves on
most of the radiators - that might be something you could do.
Ghe
Michael Trew
2022-01-03 00:05:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Thermostat. Up.
Cindy Hamilton
I started the season on 55. NOPE... to 60. Inched up to 63 at the last
cold spell. I'd prefer 65, but it's always at least 5 degrees warmer
upstairs, and that would leave my bedroom even hotter (too hot) with the
door shut. Door open, and I've sometimes woken up to my cat sleeping on
my face.
Single-story house here. Thermostat is always at 71 F, winter and
summer.
Cindy Hamilton
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
Personally, I prefer a cool bedroom. Unfortunately, unless I swap the
bedroom and living room, I don't think I'll ever have that.
So much for the advantages of hot-water radiator heat. All I have
to do to cool down the bedroom is close the vents.
Cindy Hamilton
He could cut the radiation quite a bit by throwing a blanket over the
radiator.
Mixing cast iron and finned copper was a hack job by the previous owner
though. There are better ways, like the proper amount of cast iron
baseboard.
I didn't think of a blanket, I might try that. Depends on how hot it
gets though, it does get pretty hot... up to 190 degrees. I'd have to
check the heat tolerance for synthetics, for sure.

Most of the finned copper crap is gone. See, they used the same length
finned copper as the old tall cast iron radiators. The radiators of the
same width hold 4+ times the amount of hot water.
jmcquown
2022-01-03 22:41:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button.  I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.

Jill
Bruce
2022-01-04 01:20:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button.  I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-04 09:42:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.

Cindy Hamilton
bruce bowser
2022-01-04 09:50:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
I bet life in southern Louisiana is a bit different than that.
Bruce 2
2022-01-04 09:57:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 01:42:42 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Bruce 2
2022-01-04 10:45:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 2
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 01:42:42 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
This is my frogger.
Bruce 3
2022-01-04 18:03:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by Bruce 2
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 01:42:42 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
This is my frogger.
This is not my frogger.
Bruce 3
2022-01-04 16:06:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 02:26:44 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 2
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 01:42:42 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage. I've never even
heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-04 17:10:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Bruce 2
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
Bruce 3
2022-01-04 17:24:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Who said all trolls are intelligent?
Post by Sheldon Martin
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
We weren't talking about hospitals, Sherlock.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
You have a phobia for the outside world. That doesn't count as a
medical condition. It's a psychological condition.
Bruce 3
2022-01-04 18:02:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Who said all trolls are intelligent?
Post by Sheldon Martin
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
We weren't talking about hospitals, Sherlock.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
You have a phobia for the outside world. That doesn't count as a
medical condition. It's a psychological condition.
This is my frogger.
bob
2022-01-04 17:24:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Bruce 2
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
The main reason hospitals run the temp low is to help prevent growth of
bacteria. Everything else you mention is secondary.
Ed Pawlowski
2022-01-04 17:53:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bob
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Bruce 2
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
The main reason hospitals run the temp low is to help prevent growth of
bacteria.  Everything else you mention is secondary.
Humidity control. Many years ago my father was the maintenance engineer
at a printing plant. They would often run the AC in cool damp weather
and at the same run the boilers to keep the temperature up. They were
not concerned about comfort, just keeping the paper going through the
presses properly.
Bruce 3
2022-01-04 18:03:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by bob
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Bruce 2
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
The main reason hospitals run the temp low is to help prevent growth of
bacteria.  Everything else you mention is secondary.
Humidity control. Many years ago my father was the maintenance engineer
at a printing plant. They would often run the AC in cool damp weather
and at the same run the boilers to keep the temperature up. They were
not concerned about comfort, just keeping the paper going through the
presses properly.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
GM
2022-01-04 20:41:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bob
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Bruce 2
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
The main reason hospitals run the temp low is to help prevent growth of
bacteria. Everything else you mention is secondary.
Humidity control. Many years ago my father was the maintenance engineer
at a printing plant. They would often run the AC in cool damp weather
and at the same run the boilers to keep the temperature up. They were
not concerned about comfort, just keeping the paper going through the
presses properly.
Yup, when Willis Carrier invented the very first modern mechanical air conditioning system in 1902, it was
put in a Brooklyn newspaper printing plant for humidity control, high humidity would lead to ink
bleeding, thus ruining the paper run... in 1906, Carrier patented that initial device, called “An Apparatus for
Treating Air.”

Then it was used in other industrial applications, e.g. textile mills, pharmaceuticals, confectionary
manufacturing, explosives - humidity control is critical in these manufacturing processes to get good
results...

First "consumer" use was in 1917, movie theaters in Alabama and Chicago installed A/C, and it spread quickly
to theaters... Then in 1924 JL Hudson Department Store in Detroit had A/C... then office buildings (Chrysler
Building in NYC...), by the early 30's passenger rail cars, by the early 40's buses, etc... Packard cars in
1940 could be ordered with A/C...

http://air-conditioners-and-heaters.com/willis_carrier.html

"...The Buffalo Forge Co. who excelled in manufacturing heaters, blowers, and air exhaust gave
Carrier the job title of heating engineer in the newly created experimental science department of
their company. The first task they assigned him was to deal with a problem at a Brooklyn printing
plant. Only 25 at the time the very bright young man quickly identified the source of the problem
which stemmed from fluctuations in heat and humidity. This variation caused the paper to expand
and contract just enough to ensure the misalignment of the colored ink. He determined what the
proper moisture level for printing was by using the national weather tables to calculate the precise
temperature which would maintain the appropriate humidity level.

In 1902 he designed his spray driven air conditioning system which controlled both temperature
and humidity using a nozzle originally designed to spray insecticide. He built his "Apparatus for
Treating Air" (U.S. Pat. #808897) which was patented in 1906 and using chilled coils which not
only controlled heat but could lower the humidity to as low as 55%. The device was even able to
adjust the humidity level to a desired setting creating what would become the framework for
the modern air conditioner. By adjusting the air movement and temperature level to the refrigeration
coils he was able to determine the size and capacity of the unit to match the need of his customers.
While Carrier was not the first to design a system like this his was much more stable, successful
and safer that other versions and took air conditioning out of the dark ages and into the realm of science..."

</>
Bruce 5
2022-01-04 20:50:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 12:41:57 -0800 (PST), GM
Post by GM
Post by bob
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Bruce 2
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
The main reason hospitals run the temp low is to help prevent growth of
bacteria. Everything else you mention is secondary.
Humidity control. Many years ago my father was the maintenance engineer
at a printing plant. They would often run the AC in cool damp weather
and at the same run the boilers to keep the temperature up. They were
not concerned about comfort, just keeping the paper going through the
presses properly.
Yup, when Willis Carrier invented the very first modern mechanical air conditioning system in 1902, it was
put in a Brooklyn newspaper printing plant for humidity control, high humidity would lead to ink
bleeding, thus ruining the paper run... in 1906, Carrier patented that initial device, called “An Apparatus for
Treating Air.”
Then it was used in other industrial applications, e.g. textile mills, pharmaceuticals, confectionary
manufacturing, explosives - humidity control is critical in these manufacturing processes to get good
results...
First "consumer" use was in 1917, movie theaters in Alabama and Chicago installed A/C, and it spread quickly
to theaters... Then in 1924 JL Hudson Department Store in Detroit had A/C... then office buildings (Chrysler
Building in NYC...), by the early 30's passenger rail cars, by the early 40's buses, etc... Packard cars in
1940 could be ordered with A/C...
http://air-conditioners-and-heaters.com/willis_carrier.html
"...The Buffalo Forge Co. who excelled in manufacturing heaters, blowers, and air exhaust gave
Carrier the job title of heating engineer in the newly created experimental science department of
their company. The first task they assigned him was to deal with a problem at a Brooklyn printing
plant. Only 25 at the time the very bright young man quickly identified the source of the problem
which stemmed from fluctuations in heat and humidity. This variation caused the paper to expand
and contract just enough to ensure the misalignment of the colored ink. He determined what the
proper moisture level for printing was by using the national weather tables to calculate the precise
temperature which would maintain the appropriate humidity level.
In 1902 he designed his spray driven air conditioning system which controlled both temperature
and humidity using a nozzle originally designed to spray insecticide. He built his "Apparatus for
Treating Air" (U.S. Pat. #808897) which was patented in 1906 and using chilled coils which not
only controlled heat but could lower the humidity to as low as 55%. The device was even able to
adjust the humidity level to a desired setting creating what would become the framework for
the modern air conditioner. By adjusting the air movement and temperature level to the refrigeration
coils he was able to determine the size and capacity of the unit to match the need of his customers.
While Carrier was not the first to design a system like this his was much more stable, successful
and safer that other versions and took air conditioning out of the dark ages and into the realm of science..."
</>
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Bruce 5
2022-01-04 20:50:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 12:41:57 -0800 (PST), GM
Post by GM
Post by bob
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Bruce 2
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
The main reason hospitals run the temp low is to help prevent growth of
bacteria. Everything else you mention is secondary.
Humidity control. Many years ago my father was the maintenance engineer
at a printing plant. They would often run the AC in cool damp weather
and at the same run the boilers to keep the temperature up. They were
not concerned about comfort, just keeping the paper going through the
presses properly.
Yup, when Willis Carrier invented the very first modern mechanical air conditioning system in 1902, it was
put in a Brooklyn newspaper printing plant for humidity control, high humidity would lead to ink
bleeding, thus ruining the paper run... in 1906, Carrier patented that initial device, called “An Apparatus for
Treating Air.”
Then it was used in other industrial applications, e.g. textile mills, pharmaceuticals, confectionary
manufacturing, explosives - humidity control is critical in these manufacturing processes to get good
results...
First "consumer" use was in 1917, movie theaters in Alabama and Chicago installed A/C, and it spread quickly
to theaters... Then in 1924 JL Hudson Department Store in Detroit had A/C... then office buildings (Chrysler
Building in NYC...), by the early 30's passenger rail cars, by the early 40's buses, etc... Packard cars in
1940 could be ordered with A/C...
http://air-conditioners-and-heaters.com/willis_carrier.html
"...The Buffalo Forge Co. who excelled in manufacturing heaters, blowers, and air exhaust gave
Carrier the job title of heating engineer in the newly created experimental science department of
their company. The first task they assigned him was to deal with a problem at a Brooklyn printing
plant. Only 25 at the time the very bright young man quickly identified the source of the problem
which stemmed from fluctuations in heat and humidity. This variation caused the paper to expand
and contract just enough to ensure the misalignment of the colored ink. He determined what the
proper moisture level for printing was by using the national weather tables to calculate the precise
temperature which would maintain the appropriate humidity level.
In 1902 he designed his spray driven air conditioning system which controlled both temperature
and humidity using a nozzle originally designed to spray insecticide. He built his "Apparatus for
Treating Air" (U.S. Pat. #808897) which was patented in 1906 and using chilled coils which not
only controlled heat but could lower the humidity to as low as 55%. The device was even able to
adjust the humidity level to a desired setting creating what would become the framework for
the modern air conditioner. By adjusting the air movement and temperature level to the refrigeration
coils he was able to determine the size and capacity of the unit to match the need of his customers.
While Carrier was not the first to design a system like this his was much more stable, successful
and safer that other versions and took air conditioning out of the dark ages and into the realm of science..."
</>
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Bruce 3
2022-01-04 18:04:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bob
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Bruce 3
Post by Bruce 2
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage.
I've never even heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
The main reason hospitals run the temp low is to help prevent growth of
bacteria. Everything else you mention is secondary.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Dave Smith
2022-01-05 00:02:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
NEVER use the fancy, thick, expensive filters also.  I've heard HVAC
guys say that; it makes the blower motor work extra hard to pull air
through, and it wears out quickly.  Plus, some people use an expensive
filter as a license to change it less frequently.  I always hear to use
the regular/cheaper filter, and ALWAYS change it every 30 days, during
months when your HVAC system is running.
I asked my furnace guy and he said to just use the cheap ones.

I was lax about changing filters. I thought I had done it recently.
Yesterday morning it was pretty cold outside and my house was 5 degrees
under the thermostat setting. I wondered about the filter maybe needing
replacement. I had a hard time pulling the old filter out of the slot
and when I got it out it was like the furnace fan giving a huge sigh of
relief. I slipped a new filter in and the rest of the house warmed up
quickly.
Bruce
2022-01-05 00:13:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
NEVER use the fancy, thick, expensive filters also. I've heard HVAC
guys say that; it makes the blower motor work extra hard to pull air
through, and it wears out quickly. Plus, some people use an expensive
filter as a license to change it less frequently. I always hear to use
the regular/cheaper filter, and ALWAYS change it every 30 days, during
months when your HVAC system is running.
I asked my furnace guy and he said to just use the cheap ones.
I was lax about changing filters. I thought I had done it recently.
Yesterday morning it was pretty cold outside and my house was 5 degrees
under the thermostat setting. I wondered about the filter maybe needing
replacement. I had a hard time pulling the old filter out of the slot
and when I got it out it was like the furnace fan giving a huge sigh of
relief. I slipped a new filter in and the rest of the house warmed up
quickly.
I also wondered who these 44% are who approve of Biden are.

Is such a large part of the population really that mentally ill or intellectually deficient?
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-05 16:56:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 16:13:05 -0800 (PST), Bruce
Post by Bruce
Post by Sheldon Martin
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
NEVER use the fancy, thick, expensive filters also. I've heard HVAC
guys say that; it makes the blower motor work extra hard to pull air
through, and it wears out quickly. Plus, some people use an expensive
filter as a license to change it less frequently. I always hear to use
the regular/cheaper filter, and ALWAYS change it every 30 days, during
months when your HVAC system is running.
I asked my furnace guy and he said to just use the cheap ones.
Your AC and furnace guys are schmucks. There are filters and there
are FILTERS. We use Aprilaire, serviced by their Authorized Tech.
Automobiles have filters too; air, fuel, oil, cabin. If you had a new
$80,000 car would you use Nickel & Dime filters and maybe not change
them until you got around to it?
Post by Bruce
I was lax about changing filters. I thought I had done it recently.
Yesterday morning it was pretty cold outside and my house was 5 degrees
under the thermostat setting. I wondered about the filter maybe needing
replacement. I had a hard time pulling the old filter out of the slot
and when I got it out it was like the furnace fan giving a huge sigh of
relief. I slipped a new filter in and the rest of the house warmed up
quickly.
I also wondered who these 44% are who approve of Biden are.
Is such a large part of the population really that mentally ill or intellectually deficient?
When I hear Biden speak I wouldn't vote for him to prepare a bowl of
flaky wakies, must be a lot of people who vote the A Hole party
Bruce 6
2022-01-05 00:16:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 19:02:58 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Sheldon Martin
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
NEVER use the fancy, thick, expensive filters also.  I've heard HVAC
guys say that; it makes the blower motor work extra hard to pull air
through, and it wears out quickly.  Plus, some people use an expensive
filter as a license to change it less frequently.  I always hear to use
the regular/cheaper filter, and ALWAYS change it every 30 days, during
months when your HVAC system is running.
I asked my furnace guy and he said to just use the cheap ones.
You have a furnace guy? Friend of yours?
i***@webtv.net
2022-01-05 00:45:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
I was lax about changing filters. I thought I had done it recently.
Yesterday morning it was pretty cold outside and my house was 5 degrees
under the thermostat setting. I wondered about the filter maybe needing
replacement. I had a hard time pulling the old filter out of the slot
and when I got it out it was like the furnace fan giving a huge sigh of
relief. I slipped a new filter in and the rest of the house warmed up
quickly.
I have to write a reminder on my kitchen calendar when it's time to change
a/c/furnace filters.
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-05 15:52:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Sheldon Martin
For a troll you possess a significantly low IQ.
Hospitals keep their A/C on continuously, as do many others.
Actually the main job of air conditioning is to filter the air of
particulates, next is dehumidifying or humidifying, last is cooling.
Too many forget to change the A/C's filter, usually they're just too
cheap... little do the cheapskates realize that a dirty/clogged
filter makes the A/C work harder, increasing their electric bill.
NEVER use the fancy, thick, expensive filters also.  I've heard HVAC
guys say that; it makes the blower motor work extra hard to pull air
through, and it wears out quickly.  Plus, some people use an expensive
filter as a license to change it less frequently.  I always hear to use
the regular/cheaper filter, and ALWAYS change it every 30 days, during
months when your HVAC system is running.
I asked my furnace guy and he said to just use the cheap ones.
I was lax about changing filters. I thought I had done it recently.
Yesterday morning it was pretty cold outside and my house was 5 degrees
under the thermostat setting. I wondered about the filter maybe needing
replacement. I had a hard time pulling the old filter out of the slot
and when I got it out it was like the furnace fan giving a huge sigh of
relief. I slipped a new filter in and the rest of the house warmed up
quickly.
With cheap filters you may as well not use any filter.
We use an Aprilair filtration system, it's serviced by the A/C tech.
In winter the blower motor automatically switches to low so it's still
filtering when it's not cooling. For winter we have a propane fired
furnace with baseboard hot water. Switching is not automatic, we
switch it manually. Heating and cooling each have their own
thermostat. There's a switch in the basement to turn the furnace on
or off. For about two months a year the furnace is off, saves propane.
The last owner had no central A/C, they had only a window unit in
their bedroom and rarely turned it on. For them A/C was to plant huge
maple trees overhanging the house for shade, first thing we got rid
of. They thought it was more efficient to have their rotted roofing
replaced every 7-8 years. They heated with oil. They had a very
good industrial furnace, all heavy duty cast iron, we had it converted
to propane, no natural gas here. People years ago didn't believe in
A/C, my father was the same... took a long time to convince him to
convert from coal to oil. Back then it was my job to sift the ashes
and pick out unburned chunks of coal.
I think people who heat with wood are mentally unbalanced, they
pollute and risk house fires. Lots of people here heat with wood,
every year there are house fires that burn to the ground and entire
families die. The ashes of the burned house can sit for months as a
reminder and yet people are still heating with wood, pellet stoves are
as bad.
Bruce 3
2022-01-04 18:01:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 02:26:44 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 2
On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 01:42:42 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
People who always have their airco on, are contributing to the
destruction of the planet. They're lazy, entitled and selfish.
Or have a health condition that precludes them from breathing
un-conditioned air.
Yes, but that would be an extremely small percentage. I've never even
heard of "I can't breathe un-conditioned air".
This is my frogger.
Jeßus
2022-01-04 20:30:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
If/when I decided to move again, one of the first checkpoints on the
list is a house that can be insulated. As beautiful as old brick homes
are, the inability to insulate the walls makes for a drafty,
uncomfortable existence. I'm assuming that your house is very well
insulated to heat that well from "waste heat".
I know you've told us in the past, but refresh my memory why you can't
have blown in insulation in your walls, please.
This is spray insulation? I've been looking into this a lot lately for
future reference. We're thinking of putting this property onto the
market in about a year's time. Thinking about buying a virgin block of
land and building from scratch, but in quite a specific way... future
proofing (as best we can). Hard to find many businesses here who do
spray insulation, but it seems like the best way to go IMO.
i***@webtv.net
2022-01-04 21:04:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jeßus
I know you've told us in the past, but refresh my memory why you can't
have blown in insulation in your walls, please.
This is spray insulation? I've been looking into this a lot lately for
future reference. We're thinking of putting this property onto the
market in about a year's time. Thinking about buying a virgin block of
land and building from scratch, but in quite a specific way... future
proofing (as best we can). Hard to find many businesses here who do
spray insulation, but it seems like the best way to go IMO.
The spray insulation is applied before drywall, and it expands to fill in all
the little spaces between studs. The blown-in is used for existing walls
such as in an older home. A small hole is drilled in the drywall in each room
the size of the hose that will be used to blow the insulation in. This blown-in
stuff fills the cavity between the outer wall and the inner drywall. After filling,
the hole is patched. The blown-in stuff is fire and rodent proof.
Gary
2022-01-05 12:20:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jeßus
This is spray insulation? I've been looking into this a lot lately for
future reference. We're thinking of putting this property onto the
market in about a year's time. Thinking about buying a virgin block of
land and building from scratch, but in quite a specific way... future
proofing (as best we can). Hard to find many businesses here who do
spray insulation, but it seems like the best way to go IMO.
I just wrote about this earlier this morning. I'm not an insulation guy
but I've seen it done many ways.

A brand new house is the best time to insulate.
I like the fluffy, cottony looking stuff for attic floors.

For walls, use either the old fiber glass rolls with foil covering.
OR...Just saw this the other day... A new spray foam insulation for
walls. They spray it on thin but it expands as it dries to hard.

For underneath your house (if you have a crawlspace), the old rolls of
fiberglass with foil covering is hard to beat.
Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-05 13:04:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Jeßus
This is spray insulation? I've been looking into this a lot lately for
future reference. We're thinking of putting this property onto the
market in about a year's time. Thinking about buying a virgin block of
land and building from scratch, but in quite a specific way... future
proofing (as best we can). Hard to find many businesses here who do
spray insulation, but it seems like the best way to go IMO.
I just wrote about this earlier this morning. I'm not an insulation guy
but I've seen it done many ways.
A brand new house is the best time to insulate.
I like the fluffy, cottony looking stuff for attic floors.
For walls, use either the old fiber glass rolls with foil covering.
OR...Just saw this the other day... A new spray foam insulation for
walls. They spray it on thin but it expands as it dries to hard.
It's not that new. I've seen it for a couple of decades at least. It's the
big brother of this type of thing:
<https://www.amazon.com/GREAT-STUFF-Window-Insulating-Sealant/dp/B0002YX97K>

Cindy Hamilton
Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-04 21:43:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
Cindy Hamilton
If/when I decided to move again, one of the first checkpoints on the
list is a house that can be insulated. As beautiful as old brick homes
are, the inability to insulate the walls makes for a drafty,
uncomfortable existence. I'm assuming that your house is very well
insulated to heat that well from "waste heat".
The attic is well insulated. The walls are not.

Drafty doesn't seem to bother me. We keep the furnace fan running 24/7,
and several rooms always have a ceiling fan running.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2022-01-05 17:52:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
Cindy Hamilton
If/when I decided to move again, one of the first checkpoints on the
list is a house that can be insulated. As beautiful as old brick homes
are, the inability to insulate the walls makes for a drafty,
uncomfortable existence. I'm assuming that your house is very well
insulated to heat that well from "waste heat".
The attic is well insulated. The walls are not.
I had an insulation company check. My upstairs walls and attic floor
had blow in insulation circa 1970's. It's settled, and they missed lots
of spots in the floor. I didn't wish to pay $900+ dollars to have the
floor topped off. Perhaps I'll tap a friend who does this kind of work
on the side and borrow his machine to try to blow where it's shallow.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Drafty doesn't seem to bother me. We keep the furnace fan running 24/7,
and several rooms always have a ceiling fan running.
Cindy Hamilton
It's funny, if it's in the mid/high 50's out, I'm relatively comfortable
at 63 inside. If it's in the 20's out, I'm freezing. Drafts would be
what I could suspect. My fans are off and put away until it's hot out.
It's very difficult to bundle up when using the computer, but under 2
blankets on the couch, I'm fine.

Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-05 09:26:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never run it below 65F in either direction.
That's not what I meant. When the exterior temperature is below 65 F (or
thereabouts), most domestic air-conditioning systems should not be running:

<https://www.hunker.com/12612279/if-the-outside-temp-is-58-can-i-safely-run-the-air-conditioner>
The air conditioner is designed to manipulate the properties of the refrigerant between a gas and liquid. When the exterior temperature drops below the minimum temperature, the refrigerant starts acting differently. The air conditioner usually still runs at lower temperatures, but the A/C experiences excess strain to compensate for the changes.

Ultimately, running the system at these temperatures would damage the compressor. The amount of time it takes to ruin the A/C compressor varies substantially based on the design of the compressor, operating parameters of the system, and external temperature. It's difficult to predict how long it would take to blow out the compressor as a result.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce 6
2022-01-05 11:47:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Jan 2022 01:26:55 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
I've known some people that have an HVAC system set up that
automatically cycles between A/C and heat, and they never have to touch
a button. I'd rather have days with open windows, fresh breeze, and
ride out the natural weather, putting off climate control until it's
necessary.
I have my HVAC thermostat set to Auto. It will turn the AC on at thr
specified temperature, the heat on at the (both temperatures are
changeable, of course). There's always the option to turn the system
OFF, which I do when the weather is comfortable enough to have the
windows open (Spring/Fall). No way am I going to be uncomfortable in my
own home.
Jill
Manufacturers generally recommend that you don't run your domestic
air-conditioning unit below 65 F. At 65 F, my thermostat would be calling
for air-conditioning, because waste heat from appliances and bodies
would keep the house too warm. Manual control is preferable for me.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never run it below 65F in either direction.
That's not what I meant. When the exterior temperature is below 65 F (or
<https://www.hunker.com/12612279/if-the-outside-temp-is-58-can-i-safely-run-the-air-conditioner>
The air conditioner is designed to manipulate the properties of the refrigerant between a gas and liquid. When the exterior temperature drops below the minimum temperature, the refrigerant starts acting differently. The air conditioner usually still runs at lower temperatures, but the A/C experiences excess strain to compensate for the changes.
Ultimately, running the system at these temperatures would damage the compressor. The amount of time it takes to ruin the A/C compressor varies substantially based on the design of the compressor, operating parameters of the system, and external temperature. It's difficult to predict how long it would take to blow out the compressor as a result.
Cindy Hamilton
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Gary
2022-01-05 11:10:18 UTC
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If/when I decided to move again, one of the first checkpoints on the
list is a house that can be insulated. As beautiful as old brick homes
are, the inability to insulate the walls makes for a drafty,
uncomfortable existence. I'm assuming that your house is very well
insulated to heat that well from "waste heat".
I know you've told us in the past, but refresh my memory why you can't
have blown in insulation in your walls, please.
Blown in insulation is a good, fairly cheap option for attic floors.
Not so good for walls. Requires many holes punched into the walls and it
will settle (by gravity) over time and leave you with half insulated
walls eventually.

And then there is the wall patching and repainting.

Walls should use the old roll insulation that you staple in or the new
foam insulation that hardens after you spray it on. Good option for a
new house before the drywall is put up. For an old house, you'd have to
remove the walls first.
Bruce 6
2022-01-05 11:45:27 UTC
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Post by Gary
If/when I decided to move again, one of the first checkpoints on the
list is a house that can be insulated. As beautiful as old brick homes
are, the inability to insulate the walls makes for a drafty,
uncomfortable existence. I'm assuming that your house is very well
insulated to heat that well from "waste heat".
I know you've told us in the past, but refresh my memory why you can't
have blown in insulation in your walls, please.
Blown in insulation is a good, fairly cheap option for attic floors.
Not so good for walls. Requires many holes punched into the walls and it
will settle (by gravity) over time and leave you with half insulated
walls eventually.
And then there is the wall patching and repainting.
Walls should use the old roll insulation that you staple in or the new
foam insulation that hardens after you spray it on. Good option for a
new house before the drywall is put up. For an old house, you'd have to
remove the walls first.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Cindy Hamilton
2022-01-05 13:06:44 UTC
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Permalink
If/when I decided to move again, one of the first checkpoints on the
list is a house that can be insulated. As beautiful as old brick homes
are, the inability to insulate the walls makes for a drafty,
uncomfortable existence. I'm assuming that your house is very well
insulated to heat that well from "waste heat".
I know you've told us in the past, but refresh my memory why you can't
have blown in insulation in your walls, please.
I don't speak for Michael, but I think he has a masonry house, as I do.
In my house, there is only about 1/4 inch of space between the concrete
block walls and the drywall. I think Michael has lath and plaster, which
might mean zero space between the block wall and the interior finished
surface.

Cindy Hamilton
jmcquown
2022-01-01 16:05:48 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's
not paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm,
I'm absolutely freezing.
Hot showers are your friend in the cold winter days.  :)
And he does have a space heater in the bathroom. :)

Jill
dsi1
2022-01-01 17:49:44 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Hot showers are your friend in the cold winter days. :)
I like hot showers on hot days too. It doesn't make much sense - or does it?
Gary
2022-01-02 11:08:48 UTC
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Post by dsi1
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Hot showers are your friend in the cold winter days. :)
I like hot showers on hot days too. It doesn't make much sense - or does it?
It makes sense to me. I always take hot showers.
bruce bowser
2022-01-01 19:05:50 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's not
paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm, I'm
absolutely freezing.
Hot showers are your friend in the cold winter days. :)
Once you found out where that irritating cold draft is seeping in from.
Bruce
2022-01-01 21:12:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 01 Jan 2022 14:51:31 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Jeßus
Have a good one. We're in for another hot day here, 35C/95F. The
thermometer on our verandah read 34C yesterday and that's in the
shade. Gonna have to try to go camping again soon if this keeps up.
I'll take that over the 40 some degrees here now (so as long as it's
not paired with high humidity)... even though it's unseasonably warm,
I'm absolutely freezing.
Hot showers are your friend in the cold winter days. :)
I never bought
We know.
Bruce
2021-12-31 19:43:50 UTC
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Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
You have manboobs.
Post by Jeßus
I was great to see nobody gave a shit about the covid restrictions we
have here. I'm not even supposed to be allowed to enter the building,
as I am unvaccinated (they are supposed to check everyone at the
door). No masks worn, at all either (another legal requirement).
People even stood next to each other! <gasp>.
Jehovah's Witness strikes again.

PS: Jebus lives on an island that has very little covid, so far. This
will change with free travel between the Australian states, but they
don't have to worry too much yet. Apparently, Jebus thinks the whole
world is like his island :)
Cindy Hamilton
2021-12-31 20:07:30 UTC
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Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
That looks nice.

We're staying home and letting the amateur drunks have full use of
the roads.

Cindy Hamilton
Jeßus
2021-12-31 20:23:18 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:07:30 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
That looks nice.
We've been going to pubs for food more and more lately, instead of
restaurants. TBH, pub food here is really quite decent. Some pubs (but
certainly not all) tend to have similar menus.

In recent years, Chicken Parmigiana is always on the menu here and
extremely popular for some reason. I guess it ticks all the boxes for
comfort food, quite carby. I've had it a couple of times, it's OK but
there's always something else I would rather have. But also, these
days you literally never know what will be on the menu at pubs here, a
lot of dishes are quite exotic at times.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
We're staying home and letting the amateur drunks have full use of
the roads.
Sounds like a plan. We were going to stay home but changed our minds
at the last minute.
Dave Smith
2021-12-31 21:41:26 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
That looks nice.
We're staying home and letting the amateur drunks have full use of
the roads.
We are staying in too. It's 4:30 pm here and we are getting started on
dinner prep. I am making a chocolate eclairs for dessert. The choux
pastry just went into the oven so it will be ready to fill and frost
before I have to start first course.

Our appetizer will be smoked salmon with a horse radish sauce. The
entree will be a rack of lamb. I wish I could remember how much longer I
have to cook it than the recipes call for. The first few times I used
the recipe for a crusted rack they were way way underdone. I like it on
the low side of medium rare, but they were raw and cool inside. I will
definitely use a thermometer. I am thinking steamed beans and squashed
potatoes. The oven will already by nice and hot so I won't bother with
the air fryer.


Happy New Year to all
Bruce
2021-12-31 21:48:51 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:41:26 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
That looks nice.
We're staying home and letting the amateur drunks have full use of
the roads.
We are staying in too. It's 4:30 pm here and we are getting started on
dinner prep. I am making a chocolate eclairs for dessert. The choux
pastry just went into the oven so it will be ready to fill and frost
before I have to start first course.
Our appetizer will be smoked salmon with a horse radish sauce. The
entree will be a rack of lamb. I wish I could remember how much longer I
have to cook it than the recipes call for. The first few times I used
the recipe for a crusted rack they were way way underdone. I like it on
the low side of medium rare, but they were raw and cool inside. I will
definitely use a thermometer. I am thinking steamed beans and squashed
potatoes. The oven will already by nice and hot so I won't bother with
the air fryer.
Happy New Year to all
Ghe
jmcquown
2021-12-31 20:25:59 UTC
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Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
Happy New Year! I'm glad you had a nice NYE dinner. :)

Jill
Jeßus
2021-12-31 20:30:23 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
Happy New Year! I'm glad you had a nice NYE dinner. :)
Thanks Jill and hope you have a good one too :)
Bruce
2022-01-01 03:33:31 UTC
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Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
Happy New Year! I'm glad you had a nice NYE dinner. :)
Jill
Canned is cooked. Frozen is not cooked. Do we have to explain
everything to this guy?
Bruce
2022-01-01 05:18:05 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Jeßus
Was nothing too fancy... we went to a pub for dinner and live music.
Wife had Reef and Beef - Scotch fillet with scallops and prawns, with
a glass of lemon, lime and bitters. I had fish and chips, washed down
with a nice ale. And we shared an entree of Arancini. Everything was
cooked just right, they obviously have good staff and no long wait for
the food despite the number of people. Slept in the back of the ute
and drove home earlier this morning. No hangover.
Pic not ideal but anyway: https://i.postimg.cc/WbJYKv8z/31120221.jpg
Happy New Year! I'm glad you had a nice NYE dinner. :)
Jill
Michael's an excellent example of American ignorance and explains how
Americans were able to vote for the Trump clown. The deplorables are
poorly educated, poorly informed, have never been out of their own
country and are easily influenced. Yet they do have the right to vote.
And there you are: Donald Trump. I can't wait for the next American
election. May I suggest Sylvester Stallone? :)
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