Discussion:
I had a delicious Vegetarian STD Meal!
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John Kuthe
2021-11-19 22:44:43 UTC
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Green Beans and Asparagus, cooked tender and buttered, and Brown Rice and my Sweet and Hot Beans!

And after dinner, CBD Treats and Lemon Tree Punch cannabis and:

https://www.pbs.org/video/carole-king-james-taylor-live-at-the-troubadour-5qmki3/

Life does NOT SUCK! :-)


John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
John Kuthe
2021-11-20 01:17:00 UTC
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Post by John Kuthe
Life does NOT SUCK! :-)
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
It does for you.
No it doesn't!

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-20 01:49:30 UTC
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Post by John Kuthe
Post by John Kuthe
Life does NOT SUCK! :-)
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
It does for you.
No it doesn't!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
No friends, no girlfriend, your son wants nothing to do with you nor your sister.
No job and not much prospect of one that will reach that $60,000 goal. No
renters either.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-20 03:16:27 UTC
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Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by John Kuthe
Post by John Kuthe
Life does NOT SUCK! :-)
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
It does for you.
No it doesn't!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
No friends, no girlfriend, your son wants nothing to do with you nor your sister.
No job and not much prospect of one that will reach that $60,000 goal. No
renters either.
And now, no djembe and no audio system.
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-20 09:02:22 UTC
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Post by Hank Rogers
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by John Kuthe
Post by John Kuthe
Life does NOT SUCK! :-)
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
It does for you.
No it doesn't!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
No friends, no girlfriend, your son wants nothing to do with you nor your sister.
No job and not much prospect of one that will reach that $60,000 goal. No
renters either.
And now, no djembe and no audio system.
Didn't he get his djembe re-skinned? Are you suggesting that without
the sound system, the djembe is worthless? You're forgetting. This is
John. If anyone knows how to play by himself...

--Bryan
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-20 14:27:36 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by John Kuthe
Post by John Kuthe
Life does NOT SUCK! :-)
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
It does for you.
No it doesn't!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
No friends, no girlfriend, your son wants nothing to do with you nor your sister.
No job and not much prospect of one that will reach that $60,000 goal. No
renters either.
And now, no djembe and no audio system.
Didn't he get his djembe re-skinned? Are you suggesting that without
the sound system, the djembe is worthless?
Drumming along while recorded music plays gives the illusion of companionship.

Cindy Hamilton
jmcquown
2021-11-20 15:26:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by John Kuthe
Post by John Kuthe
Life does NOT SUCK! :-)
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
It does for you.
No it doesn't!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
No friends, no girlfriend, your son wants nothing to do with you nor your sister.
No job and not much prospect of one that will reach that $60,000 goal. No
renters either.
I doubt Kootchie could get someone to occupy a room rent free...
except the cockroaches.
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.

I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.

Jill
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-20 18:58:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom.  Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened.  He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit.  Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it.  He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH!  Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-20 20:54:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a
shared upstairs bathroom.  Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates
didn't come flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house
to new students.
I can figure out what happened.  He went to all the trouble to
pay for occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit.  Those
permits have long since expired and restrictions have been lifted
but he hasn't the money to get the occupancy permits renewed nor
the wherewithal to do it.  He could easily be bringing in money
in that "Shared Student Living" he constantly crowed about when
he was RICH RICH RICH!  Look how that turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
She sure keeps you busy, master.
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-20 23:48:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.

BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
jmcquown
2021-11-21 00:21:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
He talked about having to pay for inspections to get those occupancy
permits. Yeah, Covid-19 hit but gee, students went back to school at
the University. So much for his "shared International student living"
dream supporting him for the rest of his life.

Jill
John Kuthe
2021-11-21 00:29:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!


John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
jmcquown
2021-11-21 00:32:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?

Jill
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-21 00:57:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.

When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
Jill
--Bryan
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-21 10:22:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.

Cindy Hamilton
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-21 13:40:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.

The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
Cindy Hamilton
--Bryan
John Kuthe
2021-11-21 13:49:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sunday, November 21, 2021 at 7:41:02 AM UTC-6, ***@gmail.com wrote:
...
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Cindy Hamilton
--Bryan
GFIs are easy to FAKE! Dr Luo faked then in this house. Just had his cheap electrician tie then to any existing GND to function and test test OK, but use the same old wiring, rather than my up to today's electrical code standards which requires each GFi to be on it's own 20A breaker!


John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-21 14:10:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
Cindy Hamilton
--Bryan
I've owned houses in three states. Never had to have an inspection or
permit. This house was new so of course it had the standard inspections
as it was being built.

People often have an independent inspection when they are buying, but
they are often a joke too. I've see where things have been missed.
jmcquown
2021-11-21 14:31:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a
conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks.  They're civil servants.  They
check things like electrical outlets.  If you have a 2-prong
receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground.  I think that's pretty reasonable.  They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional.  They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off.  Stairways have to
have banisters.  Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work.  That
kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order.  How could any of
those things be overreach?
I've owned houses in three states.  Never had to have an inspection or
permit.  This house was new so of course it had the standard inspections
as it was being built.
People often have an independent inspection when they are buying, but
they are often a joke too.  I've see where things have been missed.
There is a home inspection company (they aren't civil servants) with an
office across the hall where I work. People pay to get houses inspected
prior to buying so they can get the sellers to make necessary repairs so
they don't have any surprises after they move in. I've never heard of
anyone having to have an "occupancy permit" once a house has passed
inspection. Perhaps Bryan is talking about places which should be
condemned buildings with no toilets or running water. <shrug>

They tell me stories about people painting over wood rot and thinking
they won't notice. Slap all the paint on it you want, if they can poke
a pencil through it, it's NOT going to be a great inspection report.
People try all sorts of things to jack up the price of the houses they
are selling.

Jill
Dave Smith
2021-11-21 15:37:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I've owned houses in three states.  Never had to have an inspection or
permit.  This house was new so of course it had the standard inspections
as it was being built.
People often have an independent inspection when they are buying, but
they are often a joke too.  I've see where things have been missed.
Around here the occupancy is part of the initial building permit
process. The house is inspected to ensure that it meets the
requirements of the building code. It is for new homes. Once you the
house is finished and passes inspection it can be sold and no new
occupancy permit is required. House inspections are sometimes required
in order to get a permit, and some home buyers have them done and make
offers condition on the building passing.

My son had his first house inspected. He only lived there for about a
year and ran into a problem with the roof. There had been a branch
rubbing against the edge of the roof and had done some damage.
Apparently the inspector never climbed a ladder to check the roof.
Michael Trew
2021-11-21 23:02:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong
receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
--Bryan
I've owned houses in three states. Never had to have an inspection or
permit. This house was new so of course it had the standard inspections
as it was being built.
People often have an independent inspection when they are buying, but
they are often a joke too. I've see where things have been missed.
Yes, no inspections or permits here. Now, there is a basic inspection
by the city if you want to apply for a rental license, to make sure that
the home isn't a death trap... but you can live in whatever you want.

Many times, for a home loan, you have to have an inspection done by a
"professional" (I tend to catch more issues than they do) before you can
get the mortgage. If you are buying a house outright, inherited, etc;
that's completely optional.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-21 14:16:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
If I want to buy a house that isn't up to current code, then I should be
able buy it. I have never bought a house that would comply with your
civil servants' requirements.

I'm not a child who has to have a civil servant tell me whether I can occupy
a house, or whether the hot and cold water taps dispense hot and
cold water. How difficult is it for anybody to walk through a house
and turn on a tap?

Cindy Hamilton
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-21 14:28:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
If I want to buy a house that isn't up to current code, then I should be
able buy it. I have never bought a house that would comply with your
civil servants' requirements.
You can buy it, as long as you have the 20% down payment. My son's
house was bought with 20% down.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I'm not a child who has to have a civil servant tell me whether I can occupy
a house, or whether the hot and cold water taps dispense hot and
cold water. How difficult is it for anybody to walk through a house
and turn on a tap?
And you wouldn't live in one of the fine suburban communities that have
standards.
https://www.ksdk.com/article/features/richmond-heights-best-places-to-live-america/63-42375424-766d-4075-9d01-fb95b45d7f4d
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Cindy Hamilton
--Bryan
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-21 14:35:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
If I want to buy a house that isn't up to current code, then I should be
able buy it. I have never bought a house that would comply with your
civil servants' requirements.
You can buy it, as long as you have the 20% down payment. My son's
house was bought with 20% down.
Who the hell buys a house with less than 20% down? How else do you
get a decent mortgage.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I'm not a child who has to have a civil servant tell me whether I can occupy
a house, or whether the hot and cold water taps dispense hot and
cold water. How difficult is it for anybody to walk through a house
and turn on a tap?
And you wouldn't live in one of the fine suburban communities that have
standards.
https://www.ksdk.com/article/features/richmond-heights-best-places-to-live-america/63-42375424-766d-4075-9d01-fb95b45d7f4d
No place in Michigan requires an inspection or occupancy permit on
a single-family dwelling at time of sale. Not in the most expensive
neighborhood in the most expensive city. Not in the worst neighborhood in
Detroit.

Cindy Hamilton
Michelle
2021-11-21 15:04:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
If I want to buy a house that isn't up to current code, then I should be
able buy it. I have never bought a house that would comply with your
civil servants' requirements.
You can buy it, as long as you have the 20% down payment. My son's
house was bought with 20% down.
Who the hell buys a house with less than 20% down? How else do you
get a decent mortgage.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I'm not a child who has to have a civil servant tell me whether I can occupy
a house, or whether the hot and cold water taps dispense hot and
cold water. How difficult is it for anybody to walk through a house
and turn on a tap?
And you wouldn't live in one of the fine suburban communities that have
standards.
https://www.ksdk.com/article/features/richmond-heights-best-places-to-live-america/63-42375424-766d-4075-9d01-fb95b45d7f4d
No place in Michigan requires an inspection or occupancy permit on
a single-family dwelling at time of sale. Not in the most expensive
neighborhood in the most expensive city. Not in the worst neighborhood in
Detroit.
Cindy Hamilton
It’s not Missouri, it’s St. Louis county, I think. I lived in Kansas City
(other side of the state) for 30 years. No occupancy permit or
inspections required by any government entity. We did have a house
inspection, but that was a mortgage company requirement. Old
houses are not required to meet current building codes.
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-21 16:11:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
If I want to buy a house that isn't up to current code, then I should be
able buy it. I have never bought a house that would comply with your
civil servants' requirements.
You can buy it, as long as you have the 20% down payment. My son's
house was bought with 20% down.
Who the hell buys a house with less than 20% down? How else do you
get a decent mortgage.
The overwhelming majority of conventional mortgages are given with less
than 10% down. Until you get to 20% equity, lenders require PMI.
https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/071514/how-can-i-avoid-paying-private-mortgage-insurance-pmi.asp
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I'm not a child who has to have a civil servant tell me whether I can occupy
a house, or whether the hot and cold water taps dispense hot and
cold water. How difficult is it for anybody to walk through a house
and turn on a tap?
And you wouldn't live in one of the fine suburban communities that have
standards.
https://www.ksdk.com/article/features/richmond-heights-best-places-to-live-america/63-42375424-766d-4075-9d01-fb95b45d7f4d
No place in Michigan requires an inspection or occupancy permit on
a single-family dwelling at time of sale. Not in the most expensive
neighborhood in the most expensive city. Not in the worst neighborhood in
Detroit.
The city requires it prior to occupancy, but the lender requires it
to issue a conventional mortgage.
Cindy Hamilton
--Bryan
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-21 16:16:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Geezlepeets. I own my house and don't have to have an Occupancy Permit.
You're the one who was constantly crowing about Shared International
Student Living. What happened to that rainbow dream? Run of out money
for the permits or did you figure out college students don't want to
rent rooms in your flop house?
Around here, the tenant gets the occupancy permit, though the landlord
generally pays for the occupancy inspection, which is required every time
that a new person moves in. If my wife and I were to move into our little
house next door, even being owners, we would have to pay the $35 for the
inspection, and $5 for the occupancy permit. The only exception to the
occupancy permit process for a new occupant is the birth or adoption of
a child. Bel Nor is probably the same, though my son's occupancy as an
owner occupied house in Ferguson only required an external inspection.
Yeah, *that* Ferguson.
When we sell the houses, in order for the buyer to obtain a conventional
loan, the property must pass an occupancy inspection. Otherwise the
property could only be sold "as-is," and lenders will only give a mortgage
loan up to 80% of appraised value.
What a racket. The mobbed-up mid-Atlantic states have nothing on
Missouri.
The occupancy inspectors aren't crooks. They're civil servants. They
check things like electrical outlets. If you have a 2-prong receptacle, OK,
but if you have a 3-prong one, the ground plug must *actually* go to
ground. I think that's pretty reasonable. They check to make sure that
all required smoke detectors are in place and functional. They make
sure the hot and cold water both turn on and off. Stairways have to
have banisters. Garbage disposals, if installed, have to work. That kind
of stuff.
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
If I want to buy a house that isn't up to current code, then I should be
able buy it. I have never bought a house that would comply with your
civil servants' requirements.
You can buy it, as long as you have the 20% down payment. My son's
house was bought with 20% down.
Who the hell buys a house with less than 20% down? How else do you
get a decent mortgage.
The overwhelming majority of conventional mortgages are given with less
than 10% down. Until you get to 20% equity, lenders require PMI.
https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/071514/how-can-i-avoid-paying-private-mortgage-insurance-pmi.asp
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I'm not a child who has to have a civil servant tell me whether I can occupy
a house, or whether the hot and cold water taps dispense hot and
cold water. How difficult is it for anybody to walk through a house
and turn on a tap?
And you wouldn't live in one of the fine suburban communities that have
standards.
https://www.ksdk.com/article/features/richmond-heights-best-places-to-live-america/63-42375424-766d-4075-9d01-fb95b45d7f4d
No place in Michigan requires an inspection or occupancy permit on
a single-family dwelling at time of sale. Not in the most expensive
neighborhood in the most expensive city. Not in the worst neighborhood in
Detroit.
The city requires it prior to occupancy, but the lender requires it
to issue a conventional mortgage.
The lender does not require an inspection such as you describe. They
send out a guy who gives the place a once over and guesses whether
it's worth at least the mortgage amount. He doesn't do a darned thing
about electrical receptacles, plumbing, or banisters.

Cindy Hamilton
Dave Smith
2021-11-21 15:39:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bryan Simmons
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
If I want to buy a house that isn't up to current code, then I should be
able buy it. I have never bought a house that would comply with your
civil servants' requirements.
I'm not a child who has to have a civil servant tell me whether I can occupy
a house, or whether the hot and cold water taps dispense hot and
cold water. How difficult is it for anybody to walk through a house
and turn on a tap?
Never mind the demands of the civil servants. What about the bureaucrats
at your insurance company who will be quick to deny you coverage if they
find that the claim you are making on your policy has resulted from
something that did not meet the code?
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-21 16:00:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bryan Simmons
The receptacle in the bathroom must have a GFCI, and all GFCIs
installed anywhere must be in good working order. How could any of
those things be overreach?
If I want to buy a house that isn't up to current code, then I should be
able buy it. I have never bought a house that would comply with your
civil servants' requirements.
I'm not a child who has to have a civil servant tell me whether I can occupy
a house, or whether the hot and cold water taps dispense hot and
cold water. How difficult is it for anybody to walk through a house
and turn on a tap?
Never mind the demands of the civil servants. What about the bureaucrats
at your insurance company who will be quick to deny you coverage if they
find that the claim you are making on your policy has resulted from
something that did not meet the code?
Funny you should mention that. Our insurance agent knows that some
of the wiring in the house is aluminum. As long as it uses the right
connectors where it meets copper, it's all good.

Everybody knows that old houses are not up to current code. They
take that into account when underwriting policies.

Cindy Hamilton
Dave Smith
2021-11-21 17:59:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Dave Smith
Never mind the demands of the civil servants. What about the bureaucrats
at your insurance company who will be quick to deny you coverage if they
find that the claim you are making on your policy has resulted from
something that did not meet the code?
Funny you should mention that. Our insurance agent knows that some
of the wiring in the house is aluminum. As long as it uses the right
connectors where it meets copper, it's all good.
So long as they know that and have signed off on it.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Everybody knows that old houses are not up to current code. They
take that into account when underwriting policies.
My insurance company sent an inspector around a few years back. He was
probably the low bidder on the job and a real slacker. There are a
number of problems I know about that he never spotted. One of them would
be the condition of my barn which is about ready to cave it. His report
noted it as a garage. His only real concern seemed to be the oil tank
what I ended up having to replace at great expense.
Michael Trew
2021-11-21 23:12:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Dave Smith
Never mind the demands of the civil servants. What about the bureaucrats
at your insurance company who will be quick to deny you coverage if they
find that the claim you are making on your policy has resulted from
something that did not meet the code?
Funny you should mention that. Our insurance agent knows that some
of the wiring in the house is aluminum. As long as it uses the right
connectors where it meets copper, it's all good.
Everybody knows that old houses are not up to current code. They
take that into account when underwriting policies.
Cindy Hamilton
The odd thing is would be that most all homes have a main electric drop
line made of #2 gauge aluminum (alternatively, #4 copper, but that's
rare), yet they get tied in knots over interior aluminum wiring. I
don't have any of but unfortunately, the entire second floor and attic
of my home (as well as first floor ceiling lighting) is knob and tube.

They also get tied in knots over fuse boxes and knob and tube wiring.
When done appropriately, fuses are actually more safe than breakers (a
_properly sized_ fuse can't get "stuck", it *always* blows when needed).
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-22 09:28:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Dave Smith
Never mind the demands of the civil servants. What about the bureaucrats
at your insurance company who will be quick to deny you coverage if they
find that the claim you are making on your policy has resulted from
something that did not meet the code?
Funny you should mention that. Our insurance agent knows that some
of the wiring in the house is aluminum. As long as it uses the right
connectors where it meets copper, it's all good.
Everybody knows that old houses are not up to current code. They
take that into account when underwriting policies.
Cindy Hamilton
The odd thing is would be that most all homes have a main electric drop
line made of #2 gauge aluminum (alternatively, #4 copper, but that's
rare), yet they get tied in knots over interior aluminum wiring.
It's rare for some clueless idiot to make an improper connection from
the drop to the panel. It's a lot more common to see a dangerous
connection made in a junction box.
Post by Michael Trew
I
don't have any of but unfortunately, the entire second floor and attic
of my home (as well as first floor ceiling lighting) is knob and tube.
They also get tied in knots over fuse boxes and knob and tube wiring.
When done appropriately, fuses are actually more safe than breakers (a
_properly sized_ fuse can't get "stuck", it *always* blows when needed).
OTOH, Joe Homeowner can't stick a penny in a circuit breaker if he
has neglected to keep a supply of fuses on hand. Or put a 20A fuse
in where a 15A is needed because he keeps overloading the circuit
and popping a fuse.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2021-11-22 16:49:06 UTC
Reply
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
The odd thing is would be that most all homes have a main electric drop
line made of #2 gauge aluminum (alternatively, #4 copper, but that's
rare), yet they get tied in knots over interior aluminum wiring.
It's rare for some clueless idiot to make an improper connection from
the drop to the panel. It's a lot more common to see a dangerous
connection made in a junction box.
Post by Michael Trew
I
don't have any of but unfortunately, the entire second floor and attic
of my home (as well as first floor ceiling lighting) is knob and tube.
They also get tied in knots over fuse boxes and knob and tube wiring.
When done appropriately, fuses are actually more safe than breakers (a
_properly sized_ fuse can't get "stuck", it *always* blows when needed).
OTOH, Joe Homeowner can't stick a penny in a circuit breaker if he
has neglected to keep a supply of fuses on hand. Or put a 20A fuse
in where a 15A is needed because he keeps overloading the circuit
and popping a fuse.
Cindy Hamilton
Yes, that is the issue (hence my underlined "properly sized"). I've
seen both the penny and over-sized fuses. I had to disconnect a circuit
in my home entirely, because it was a rats nest mess of wiring.
Whatever it powered, it mustn't have been that important.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-22 17:46:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
The odd thing is would be that most all homes have a main electric drop
line made of #2 gauge aluminum (alternatively, #4 copper, but that's
rare), yet they get tied in knots over interior aluminum wiring.
It's rare for some clueless idiot to make an improper connection from
the drop to the panel. It's a lot more common to see a dangerous
connection made in a junction box.
Post by Michael Trew
I
don't have any of but unfortunately, the entire second floor and attic
of my home (as well as first floor ceiling lighting) is knob and tube.
They also get tied in knots over fuse boxes and knob and tube wiring.
When done appropriately, fuses are actually more safe than breakers (a
_properly sized_ fuse can't get "stuck", it *always* blows when needed).
OTOH, Joe Homeowner can't stick a penny in a circuit breaker if he
has neglected to keep a supply of fuses on hand. Or put a 20A fuse
in where a 15A is needed because he keeps overloading the circuit
and popping a fuse.
Cindy Hamilton
Yes, that is the issue (hence my underlined "properly sized"). I've
seen both the penny and over-sized fuses.
Thus, it's too easy for some moron to create a dangerous situation. That's
much more difficult with circuit breakers.

Electrical (and other building) codes change for a reason. Houses are
safer than ever because of those changes.

Cindy Hamilton

Hank Rogers
2021-11-21 00:39:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
But do you have any tenants?
Have you tried craigslist?
GM
2021-11-21 02:54:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by John Kuthe
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
IIRC he was charging $250 a month for a bedroom room with a shared
upstairs bathroom. Cheap rent yet his beloved housemates didn't come
flocking back nor did they recommend his flop-house to new students.
I can figure out what happened. He went to all the trouble to pay for
occupancy lodging permits and then Covid hit. Those permits have long
since expired and restrictions have been lifted but he hasn't the money
to get the occupancy permits renewed nor the wherewithal to do it. He
could easily be bringing in money in that "Shared Student Living" he
constantly crowed about when he was RICH RICH RICH! Look how that
turned out.
Jill
He always has you humping his every post, loopy twat.
What about me?? I 'humped' his post and you didn't croak one time,
frog.
BUT if he does need to those occupancy permits renewed there's that
$850 he wasted on a camera he can't figure out that could have been
used for renewals.
I have a Single Owner Occupancy Permit, for life! Heck with Rentals that needed to be renewed every year. Pppphhtttt!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
But do you have any tenants?
Have you tried craigslist?
Or P0rnhub...???
--
GM
Janet
2021-11-20 13:08:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Kuthe
Post by John Kuthe
Life does NOT SUCK! :-)
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
It does for you.
Certainly sounds like it from his posts
Post by John Kuthe
No it doesn't!
It does.

Every other Kuthe post is a self-pitying whine about accidents,
breakages, faulty machines and equipment, service failures, your mental
illness, physical disability, erectile dusfunction, inability to fix
stuff yourself, unaffordable bills, domestic problems, car accidents,
dirt, disrepair, cockroaches, endless social failures (lost friends,
fall-outs, no tenants, no job, no relationship, no money, poverty).



Janet UK
jmcquown
2021-11-20 12:20:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Kuthe
Green Beans and Asparagus, cooked tender and buttered, and Brown Rice and my Sweet and Hot Beans!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Same old [boring] shit, different day. What happened to your job? Was
the bus late again?

Jill
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