Discussion:
And my TTP Lawn Care team is here right now! 4:04PM STL time!
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Hank Rogers
2021-10-09 22:18:58 UTC
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While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Did you invite them in to experience your wonderful stereo system?

Did you show them your glabrous genitals?

How about all your degrees?

At least offer them a shot of lazrus dope?
Bryan Simmons
2021-10-09 23:03:26 UTC
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Post by Hank Rogers
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Did you invite them in to experience your wonderful stereo system?
Did you show them your glabrous genitals?
How about all your degrees?
At least offer them a shot of lazrus dope?
Hey, I bet they used internal combustion engine lawn equipment!
Mother Gaia is probably feeling like Angel Smalls right about now.
She got it in the front, and in the back.

--Bryan
John Kuthe
2021-10-10 01:40:23 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Hank Rogers
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Did you invite them in to experience your wonderful stereo system?
Did you show them your glabrous genitals?
How about all your degrees?
At least offer them a shot of lazrus dope?
Hey, I bet they used internal combustion engine lawn equipment!
Of course they do! They are professonals and not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Post by Bryan Simmons
Mother Gaia is probably feeling like Angel Smalls right about now.
She got it in the front, and in the back.
--Bryan
You're really reaching, Bryan! Do you actually live in the Unconditioned Reality most of us live in? Or only your own deluded mind?

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Sqwertz
2021-10-10 04:12:43 UTC
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Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John? Because we're all
impotent, right?

-sw
Bryan Simmons
2021-10-10 11:38:25 UTC
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Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John? Because we're all
impotent, right?
You know if you give your 25' one a shot of John's majik penis juice,
you'll have up to 4 hours of 100'.
Fun fact: I own more feet of extension cord than John.
-sw
--Bryan
John Kuthe
2021-10-11 01:40:37 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John? Because we're all
impotent, right?
You know if you give your 25' one a shot of John's majik penis juice,
you'll have up to 4 hours of 100'.
Fun fact: I own more feet of extension cord than John.
--Bryan
I own many extension cords, Bryan, even an old 2 conductor 100ft long that I have had for years!

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Hank Rogers
2021-10-11 01:56:02 UTC
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Post by John Kuthe
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John? Because we're all
impotent, right?
You know if you give your 25' one a shot of John's majik penis juice,
you'll have up to 4 hours of 100'.
Fun fact: I own more feet of extension cord than John.
--Bryan
I own many extension cords, Bryan, even an old 2 conductor 100ft long that I have had for years!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
And 3 degrees too!
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-11 14:42:32 UTC
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Post by John Kuthe
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John? Because we're all
impotent, right?
You know if you give your 25' one a shot of John's majik penis juice,
you'll have up to 4 hours of 100'.
Fun fact: I own more feet of extension cord than John.
--Bryan
I own many extension cords, Bryan, even an old 2 conductor 100ft long that I have had for years!
John Kuthe
In the trash!

I made a mistake when I moved here, there was a big sale on garden
hose so I bought ten 100' 5/8" hoses thinking I'll be able to water
everywhere on this property, I quickly learned it's not possible to
drag much garden hose, especially when it's filled with water. I
found it easy to attach my cart to the tractor and fill it with empty
cat litter buckets and fill those with water, just don't fill them all
the way or once I start moving I'd lose a good amount of water.
Bryan Simmons
2021-10-11 19:13:33 UTC
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Post by John Kuthe
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John? Because we're all
impotent, right?
You know if you give your 25' one a shot of John's majik penis juice,
you'll have up to 4 hours of 100'.
Fun fact: I own more feet of extension cord than John.
--Bryan
I own many extension cords, Bryan, even an old 2 conductor 100ft long that I have had for years!
But you don't have as many as ME!!
Post by John Kuthe
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
--Bryan
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-10 14:28:00 UTC
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Post by Sqwertz
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Nowadays most people have outdoor recepticals.

Our house and all our outbuildings have several outdoor recepticals.
It's rare we need to use an extension cord... usually when we plant
bulbs a distance away like along our creek, I dig the holes with a 2"
auger and a 1/2" drill motor. Most of our outdoor electric tools are
battery operated. Only a whacko uses a plug-in weed whacker. We have
three weed whackers, one gasolene, two rechareable battery. Gasolene
weed whackers have more power than the electrics.
BTW, an educated person calls those recepticals, not outlets... proves
you were sleeping off drugs in school. I seriously doubt that
Kootchie has a HS diploma... maybe General, not Academic.
Post by Sqwertz
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John? Because we're all
impotent, right?
-sw
Cindy Hamilton
2021-10-10 17:12:58 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Nowadays most people have outdoor recepticals.
Here's what the NEC says:

Homes must have at least one outdoor receptacle at the front and rear of the house. They must be readily accessible from the ground and positioned no more than 6 1/2 feet above grade (ground level).

My house is not code-compliant. We don't have one at the front of the house.

Cindy Hamilton
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-10 19:04:55 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most people have outdoor recepticals.
Homes must have at least one outdoor receptacle at the front and rear of the house. They must be readily accessible from the ground and positioned no more than 6 1/2 feet above grade (ground level).
My house is not code-compliant. We don't have one at the front of the house.
Cindy Hamilton
I don't have one at the front of my house either. The 10+ year old addition at
the back of the house that has the three-season porch has three electrical
outlets. I wouldn't mind having one on the front porch but I'm not calling an
electrician to install one as I've lived without it for 33 years.
Dave Smith
2021-10-10 20:56:09 UTC
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On Sunday, October 10, 2021 at 12:13:02 PM UTC-5, Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
My house is not code-compliant. We don't have one at the front of the house.
Cindy Hamilton
I don't have one at the front of my house either. The 10+ year old
addition at the back of the house that has the three-season porch has
three electrical outlets. I wouldn't mind having one on the front
porch but I'm not calling an electrician to install one as I've lived
without it for 33 years.
The oldest part of my house is about 100 years old. There were several
additions to it, but I had no outside outlets 44 years ago when I moved
in. I installed on myself.

It's not that hard to install one if you can do basic wiring. Just find
a junction box somewhere close to where you want it. Drill a hole in the
wall, hook up a box with a GF receptacle run the line into the house and
connect the wires.
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-10 21:22:54 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
I don't have one at the front of my house either. The 10+ year old
addition at the back of the house that has the three-season porch has
three electrical outlets. I wouldn't mind having one on the front
porch but I'm not calling an electrician to install one as I've lived
without it for 33 years.
The oldest part of my house is about 100 years old.
Mine, too.
Post by Dave Smith
It's not that hard to install one if you can do basic wiring. Just find
a junction box somewhere close to where you want it. Drill a hole in the
wall, hook up a box with a GF receptacle run the line into the house and
connect the wires.
That leaves me out!
Gary
2021-10-11 14:09:15 UTC
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Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most people have outdoor recepticals.
Homes must have at least one outdoor receptacle at the front and rear of the house. They must be readily accessible from the ground and positioned no more than 6 1/2 feet above grade (ground level).
My house is not code-compliant. We don't have one at the front of the house.
Cindy Hamilton
I don't have one at the front of my house either. The 10+ year old addition at
the back of the house that has the three-season porch has three electrical
outlets. I wouldn't mind having one on the front porch but I'm not calling an
electrician to install one as I've lived without it for 33 years.
I'll bet 33 years ago, you even looked good from the waist up. Check
with Bryan about that one.
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-11 17:41:29 UTC
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Post by Gary
I don't have one at the front of my house either. The 10+ year old addition at
the back of the house that has the three-season porch has three electrical
outlets. I wouldn't mind having one on the front porch but I'm not calling an
electrician to install one as I've lived without it for 33 years.
I'll bet 33 years ago, you even looked good from the waist up. Check
with Bryan about that one.
I bet 33 years ago or longer, you never looked good.
cshenk
2021-10-11 01:24:05 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Nowadays most people have outdoor recepticals.
Homes must have at least one outdoor receptacle at the front and rear
of the house. They must be readily accessible from the ground and
positioned no more than 6 1/2 feet above grade (ground level).
My house is not code-compliant. We don't have one at the front of the house.
Cindy Hamilton
We don't either. It's grandfathered for our 1960's home.
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-11 19:03:03 UTC
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On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:24:05 -0500, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Nowadays most people have outdoor recepticals.
Homes must have at least one outdoor receptacle at the front and rear
of the house. They must be readily accessible from the ground and
positioned no more than 6 1/2 feet above grade (ground level).
My house is not code-compliant. We don't have one at the front of the house.
Cindy Hamilton
We don't either. It's grandfathered for our 1960's home.
You'd need to update in order to sell it. It'd be smarter to update
the electric sooner rather than later before the price of an
electrician goes higher and it will. You can't do it yourself unless
you're a licenced electrician and can get the work certified by the
fire underwriters. Meanwhile if you have an electrical fire your
homeowners insurance won't pay. Grandfathered in most cases is a
myth, and in most cases does not apply, certainly not where insurance
is concerned. Most of the time where grandfathered applies is in
instances like zoning, like when the requirement to build is one acre
but the house was built years ago on a half acre. The street I live
on the requirement to build is now 5 acres, but some houses were built
several years ago before the zoning was changed so those few on
smaller lots are to code due to grandfathering.
Michael Trew
2021-10-11 19:52:05 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:24:05 -0500, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Cindy Hamilton
My house is not code-compliant. We don't have one at the front of the house.
Cindy Hamilton
We don't either. It's grandfathered for our 1960's home.
You'd need to update in order to sell it. It'd be smarter to update
the electric sooner rather than later before the price of an
electrician goes higher and it will. You can't do it yourself unless
you're a licenced electrician and can get the work certified by the
fire underwriters. Meanwhile if you have an electrical fire your
homeowners insurance won't pay. Grandfathered in most cases is a
myth, and in most cases does not apply, certainly not where insurance
is concerned. Most of the time where grandfathered applies is in
instances like zoning, like when the requirement to build is one acre
but the house was built years ago on a half acre. The street I live
on the requirement to build is now 5 acres, but some houses were built
several years ago before the zoning was changed so those few on
smaller lots are to code due to grandfathering.
That depends on the locale. In my area, it's not required for an
electrician to sign off on the work, a homeowner can do their own
electrical. I've always done my own, including installing the electric
meter base and running a 100 AMP line up to the corner of the house for
the elect co to tie into.

Around here, if the electrical is not altered, and major renovations
aren't done, it is allowed to be left as is. In some cases, if the
electric is shut off - even for a day - they won't turn it on until
certain repairs are made if a house is "flagged" -- like my step
father's extremely rusty meter base. He had to have it all replaced.
Some insurance companies won't insure a house with a fuse box or or knob
and tube wiring, but you are, of course, still allowed to live there...
it might be a hassle if you want a mortgage, however.
cshenk
2021-10-16 20:38:18 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:24:05 -0500, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Cindy Hamilton
On Sat, 9 Oct 2021 23:12:43 -0500, Sqwertz
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Nowadays most people have outdoor recepticals.
Homes must have at least one outdoor receptacle at the front and
rear >> of the house. They must be readily accessible from the ground
and >> positioned no more than 6 1/2 feet above grade (ground level).
Post by cshenk
Post by Cindy Hamilton
My house is not code-compliant. We don't have one at the front of the house.
Cindy Hamilton
We don't either. It's grandfathered for our 1960's home.
You'd need to update in order to sell it. It'd be smarter to update
the electric sooner rather than later before the price of an
electrician goes higher and it will. You can't do it yourself unless
you're a licenced electrician and can get the work certified by the
fire underwriters. Meanwhile if you have an electrical fire your
homeowners insurance won't pay. Grandfathered in most cases is a
myth, and in most cases does not apply, certainly not where insurance
is concerned. Most of the time where grandfathered applies is in
instances like zoning, like when the requirement to build is one acre
but the house was built years ago on a half acre. The street I live
on the requirement to build is now 5 acres, but some houses were built
several years ago before the zoning was changed so those few on
smaller lots are to code due to grandfathering.
No, you do NOT have to update to later code to sell. Yes, I am covered
for electrical fires and not having a front facing exterior outlet does
not change that.

Where you you dream this crap up Sheldon?

You are totally wrong on grandfathering other than zoning may carry
over (but not always).
Hank Rogers
2021-10-10 17:27:46 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Nowadays most people have outdoor recepticals.
Our house and all our outbuildings have several outdoor recepticals.
It's rare we need to use an extension cord... usually when we plant
bulbs a distance away like along our creek, I dig the holes with a 2"
auger and a 1/2" drill motor. Most of our outdoor electric tools are
battery operated. Only a whacko uses a plug-in weed whacker. We have
three weed whackers, one gasolene, two rechareable battery. Gasolene
weed whackers have more power than the electrics.
BTW, an educated person calls those recepticals, not outlets... proves
you were sleeping off drugs in school. I seriously doubt that
Kootchie has a HS diploma... maybe General, not Academic.
Nobody here is educated 'cept yoose Popeye. And none can cook 'cept
yoose.

But what is a receptical Popeye?
Hank Rogers
2021-10-10 18:53:52 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
BTW, an educated person calls those recepticals, not outlets... proves
you were sleeping off drugs in school. I seriously doubt that
Kootchie has a HS diploma... maybe General, not Academic.
Sorry, is that something from the 1940s? A high school diploma
is a high school diploma in Michigan.
Cindy Hamilton
But Popeye ain't in michigan, he's somewhere on the high seas.
Dave Smith
2021-10-10 20:45:46 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
BTW, an educated person calls those recepticals, not outlets... proves
you were sleeping off drugs in school. I seriously doubt that
Kootchie has a HS diploma... maybe General, not Academic.
I thought that an educated person would know how to spell receptacle,
and that when referring to electrical issues the words receptacle and
outlet are interchangeable.
Sorry, is that something from the 1940s? A high school diploma
is a high school diploma in Michigan.
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had 4 year
and 5 year diplomas. The students who took business or trades courses
only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to do the 5 year
program. That changed close to 20 years ago so now there is n Gr.13.
Gary
2021-10-11 14:11:59 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had 4 year
and 5 year diplomas. The students who took business or trades courses
only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to do the 5 year
program. That changed close to 20 years ago so now there is n Gr.13.
In the USA, you still graduate HS after grade 12. Only extra grade now
compared to when I was young is required kindergarten. That was an
option back then but it's been required since the 1980's. It was
required when my daughter started school in 1984.

As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years are
basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13 and 14.
Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
Dave Smith
2021-10-11 15:12:12 UTC
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Post by Gary
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had  4 year
and 5 year diplomas.  The students who took business or trades courses
only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to do the 5 year
program.  That changed close to 20 years ago so now there is n Gr.13.
In the USA, you still graduate HS after grade 12. Only extra grade now
compared to when I was young is required kindergarten. That was an
option back then but it's been required since the 1980's. It was
required when my daughter started school in 1984.
Kindergarten used to be optional here and parents had to pay to send
their kids to it. I started kindergarten the first year that it was
free. High school students used to have to buy their own text books, but
the year I started high school they were free.
Post by Gary
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years are
basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13 and 14.
Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
College and university are different here. Colleges are more job
oriented, teaching specific skills and basic English courses.
Universities have higher admission standards and are more research
oriented.
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-11 18:00:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Dave Smith
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had 4 year
and 5 year diplomas. The students who took business or trades courses
only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to do the 5 year
program. That changed close to 20 years ago so now there is n Gr.13.
In the USA, you still graduate HS after grade 12. Only extra grade now
compared to when I was young is required kindergarten. That was an
option back then but it's been required since the 1980's. It was
required when my daughter started school in 1984.
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years are
basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13 and 14.
Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
I had to read 19th century French poetry in the first year of
university. Hardly high school stuff, more like torture.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-10-11 18:27:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
Post by Gary
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had 4 year
and 5 year diplomas. The students who took business or trades courses
only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to do the 5 year
program. That changed close to 20 years ago so now there is n Gr.13.
In the USA, you still graduate HS after grade 12. Only extra grade now
compared to when I was young is required kindergarten. That was an
option back then but it's been required since the 1980's. It was
required when my daughter started school in 1984.
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years are
basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13 and 14.
Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
I had to read 19th century French poetry in the first year of
university. Hardly high school stuff, more like torture.
A lot of universities must remediate poor high school education. Some
of those courses at my alma mater are
Basic Mathematics Review
Pre-College Introductory Algebra Concepts

My first two years of college included Calculus and Physics.

Cindy Hamilton
Leonard Blaisdell
2021-10-12 13:05:41 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
A lot of universities must remediate poor high school education. Some
of those courses at my alma mater are
Basic Mathematics Review
Pre-College Introductory Algebra Concepts
Back in the Dark Ages when I attended, students who were deficient in
math and English took bonehead English and bonehead math their first
semester or two. Seriously! That is what it was called around campus.
The actual course probably had a different name, and thinking back right
now, I think they were English and math 100. Everybody else took 101.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
My first two years of college included Calculus and Physics.
So did mine. I took chemistry from the git-go, since that was my major.

leo
Cindy Hamilton
2021-10-12 16:17:56 UTC
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Post by Leonard Blaisdell
A lot of universities must remediate poor high school education. Some
of those courses at my alma mater are
Basic Mathematics Review
Pre-College Introductory Algebra Concepts
Back in the Dark Ages when I attended, students who were deficient in
math and English took bonehead English and bonehead math their first
semester or two. Seriously! That is what it was called around campus.
The actual course probably had a different name, and thinking back right
now, I think they were English and math 100. Everybody else took 101.
These courses are Math 098 and such. Not even 100-level classes. I can't
fathom how those students get admitted.

Cindy Hamilton
Gary
2021-10-13 12:29:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
A lot of universities must remediate poor high school education. Some
of those courses at my alma mater are
Basic Mathematics Review
Pre-College Introductory Algebra Concepts
Back in the Dark Ages when I attended, students who were deficient in
math and English took bonehead English and bonehead math their first
semester or two. Seriously! That is what it was called around campus.
The actual course probably had a different name, and thinking back right
now, I think they were English and math 100. Everybody else took 101.
These courses are Math 098 and such. Not even 100-level classes. I can't
fathom how those students get admitted.
Community colleges will take anybody. Don't even need a HS degree to
take classes.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-10-13 13:11:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
A lot of universities must remediate poor high school education. Some
of those courses at my alma mater are
Basic Mathematics Review
Pre-College Introductory Algebra Concepts
Back in the Dark Ages when I attended, students who were deficient in
math and English took bonehead English and bonehead math their first
semester or two. Seriously! That is what it was called around campus.
The actual course probably had a different name, and thinking back right
now, I think they were English and math 100. Everybody else took 101.
These courses are Math 098 and such. Not even 100-level classes. I can't
fathom how those students get admitted.
Community colleges will take anybody. Don't even need a HS degree to
take classes.
I was talking about a four-year university, not a community college.

Cindy Hamilton
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-11 19:16:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Dave Smith
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had 4 year
and 5 year diplomas. The students who took business or trades courses
only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to do the 5 year
program. That changed close to 20 years ago so now there is n Gr.13.
In the USA, you still graduate HS after grade 12. Only extra grade now
compared to when I was young is required kindergarten. That was an
option back then but it's been required since the 1980's. It was
required when my daughter started school in 1984.
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years are
basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13 and 14.
Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
That depends mostly on what one is majoring in. I never thought
college was a continuation of High School.
Hank Rogers
2021-10-11 20:58:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Gary
Post by Dave Smith
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had 4 year
and 5 year diplomas. The students who took business or trades courses
only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to do the 5 year
program. That changed close to 20 years ago so now there is n Gr.13.
In the USA, you still graduate HS after grade 12. Only extra grade now
compared to when I was young is required kindergarten. That was an
option back then but it's been required since the 1980's. It was
required when my daughter started school in 1984.
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years are
basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13 and 14.
Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
That depends mostly on what one is majoring in. I never thought
college was a continuation of High School.
He's not as educated as yoose Popeye.
cshenk
2021-10-16 21:13:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Dave Smith
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had 4
year and 5 year diplomas. The students who took business or trades
courses only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to
do the 5 year program. That changed close to 20 years ago so now
there is n Gr.13.
In the USA, you still graduate HS after grade 12. Only extra grade
now compared to when I was young is required kindergarten. That was
an option back then but it's been required since the 1980's. It was
required when my daughter started school in 1984.
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years
are basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13
and 14. Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
Um Gary, the first year of college may involve english 101 and 102 (I
comp'ed out of both) or algebra 101/102 (comp'ed out of both) but thats
actually just the first year. After that, unless you have a
substandard remedial fingerpainting degree, it's not like that.

My first year did have Chem 101/102 and Physics 101/102 but neither
were taught in my HS. Microbiology 201, Genetics 202 were the add ons
for the first semester, plant phys 203 and calculus were the add ons
for 2nd semester. I hit the 12 hour minimum to be 'full time' but was
also working to pay my way so couldn't manage full time too.

2nd year for me was some advanced english lit classes (because you had
to take some), p-chem and organic chem (2 semesters worth). Plant
pathology, geology. Elective in archeology (covered history
requirement).
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-16 21:23:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by cshenk
Post by Gary
I have always lived in Ontario and when I went to school we had 4
year and 5 year diplomas. The students who took business or trades
courses only did 4 years. In order to go to university you had to
do the 5 year program. That changed close to 20 years ago so now
there is n Gr.13.
In the USA, you still graduate HS after grade 12. Only extra grade
now compared to when I was young is required kindergarten. That was
an option back then but it's been required since the 1980's. It was
required when my daughter started school in 1984.
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years
are basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13
and 14. Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
Um Gary, the first year of college may involve english 101 and 102 (I
comp'ed out of both) or algebra 101/102 (comp'ed out of both) but thats
actually just the first year. After that, unless you have a
substandard remedial fingerpainting degree, it's not like that.
My first year did have Chem 101/102 and Physics 101/102 but neither
were taught in my HS. Microbiology 201, Genetics 202 were the add ons
for the first semester, plant phys 203 and calculus were the add ons
for 2nd semester. I hit the 12 hour minimum to be 'full time' but was
also working to pay my way so couldn't manage full time too.
2nd year for me was some advanced english lit classes (because you had
to take some), p-chem and organic chem (2 semesters worth). Plant
pathology, geology. Elective in archeology (covered history
requirement).
It sounds as if you earned a very well - rounded education.

It has obviously served you very well in your career.
--
The real Bruce
Gary
2021-10-17 11:11:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by cshenk
Post by Gary
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years
are basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13
and 14. Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
Um Gary, the first year of college may involve english 101 and 102 (I
comp'ed out of both) or algebra 101/102 (comp'ed out of both) but thats
actually just the first year. After that, unless you have a
substandard remedial fingerpainting degree, it's not like that.
Depends on the degree you're after. Mine had required classes just like
high school but the next level of learning, not remedial classes.
English, math, science and history were the basics then some electives
tossed in. Same as high school had.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-10-17 11:27:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by cshenk
Post by Gary
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years
are basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13
and 14. Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
Um Gary, the first year of college may involve english 101 and 102 (I
comp'ed out of both) or algebra 101/102 (comp'ed out of both) but thats
actually just the first year. After that, unless you have a
substandard remedial fingerpainting degree, it's not like that.
Depends on the degree you're after. Mine had required classes just like
high school but the next level of learning, not remedial classes.
English, math, science and history were the basics then some electives
tossed in. Same as high school had.
What degree were you after?

Cindy Hamilton
Gary
2021-10-17 11:32:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Gary
Post by cshenk
Post by Gary
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years
are basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13
and 14. Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
Um Gary, the first year of college may involve english 101 and 102 (I
comp'ed out of both) or algebra 101/102 (comp'ed out of both) but thats
actually just the first year. After that, unless you have a
substandard remedial fingerpainting degree, it's not like that.
Depends on the degree you're after. Mine had required classes just like
high school but the next level of learning, not remedial classes.
English, math, science and history were the basics then some electives
tossed in. Same as high school had.
What degree were you after?
Community college. Associate in Science - Business Administration. At
least that's how it ended. I'll look up in my filing cabinet and get
back to you. It's been a long time.
But yes, I was given a list of required classes with some electives each
semester.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-10-17 11:39:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Gary
Post by cshenk
Post by Gary
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years
are basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13
and 14. Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
Um Gary, the first year of college may involve english 101 and 102 (I
comp'ed out of both) or algebra 101/102 (comp'ed out of both) but thats
actually just the first year. After that, unless you have a
substandard remedial fingerpainting degree, it's not like that.
Depends on the degree you're after. Mine had required classes just like
high school but the next level of learning, not remedial classes.
English, math, science and history were the basics then some electives
tossed in. Same as high school had.
What degree were you after?
Community college. Associate in Science - Business Administration. At
least that's how it ended. I'll look up in my filing cabinet and get
back to you. It's been a long time.
But yes, I was given a list of required classes with some electives each
semester.
Ah. It's a little different at a university. More (but not complete) flexibility in
both choice and timing:

<https://lsa.umich.edu/lsa/academics/majors-minors/computer-science-major.html>
<https://lsa.umich.edu/lsa/academics/lsa-requirements/area-distribution-requirement.html>

Cindy Hamilton
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-17 17:57:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Gary
Post by cshenk
Post by Gary
As far as continuing on to college (university), the first two years
are basically just a continuation of HS...could be called grades 13
and 14. Mostly basic classes with a few electives thrown in.
Um Gary, the first year of college may involve english 101 and 102 (I
comp'ed out of both) or algebra 101/102 (comp'ed out of both) but thats
actually just the first year. After that, unless you have a
substandard remedial fingerpainting degree, it's not like that.
Depends on the degree you're after. Mine had required classes just like
high school but the next level of learning, not remedial classes.
English, math, science and history were the basics then some electives
tossed in. Same as high school had.
What degree were you after?
Community college. Associate in Science - Business Administration.
13th grade.

cshenk
2021-10-13 01:31:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
BTW, an educated person calls those recepticals, not outlets...
proves you were sleeping off drugs in school. I seriously doubt
that Kootchie has a HS diploma... maybe General, not Academic.
Sorry, is that something from the 1940s? A high school diploma
is a high school diploma in Michigan.
Cindy Hamilton
Same everyplace I've ever been. Just says graduated and name of HS.
cshenk
2021-10-13 01:31:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
BTW, an educated person calls those recepticals, not outlets...
proves you were sleeping off drugs in school. I seriously doubt
that Kootchie has a HS diploma... maybe General, not Academic.
Sorry, is that something from the 1940s? A high school diploma
is a high school diploma in Michigan.
Cindy Hamilton
jmcquown
2021-10-10 14:45:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sqwertz
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John?
-sw
To be fair, you do need an extension cord for some things. But unless
you live in a third world country, nearly everyone has outdoor
electrical outlets. I'm about to string my Halloween blinking eyeball
lights in the bushes in front of my house. I plug them into an exterior
electrical outlet near the front door but it is not the only exterior
outlet.

Jill
Michael Trew
2021-10-10 15:21:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John?
-sw
To be fair, you do need an extension cord for some things. But unless
you live in a third world country, nearly everyone has outdoor
electrical outlets. I'm about to string my Halloween blinking eyeball
lights in the bushes in front of my house. I plug them into an exterior
electrical outlet near the front door but it is not the only exterior
outlet.
Jill
Most old homes do not have outdoor electrical outlets unless they have
been retro-fitted. My 120 year old home doesn't have any. I could
install one, but I never felt the need to. The closest that I have to
one is a screw in bulb socket on the front porch ceiling.
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-10 18:32:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sqwertz
Post by John Kuthe
not everyone has AC outlets everywhere outside like I do!
Actually, we do. And you don't because you "brag" about having so
many 100ft extension cords. Why is that, John?
-sw
To be fair, you do need an extension cord for some things. But unless
you live in a third world country, nearly everyone has outdoor
electrical outlets. I'm about to string my Halloween blinking eyeball
lights in the bushes in front of my house. I plug them into an exterior
electrical outlet near the front door but it is not the only exterior
outlet.
Lol, that's sooo tacky.
Michael Trew
2021-10-10 02:10:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Did you invite them in...
Hey, I bet they used internal combustion engine lawn equipment!
Mother Gaia is probably feeling like Angel Smalls right about now.
She got it...
--Bryan
I don't know why I still even glance at this garbage, but I'll admit, I
nearly spit out my drink..
GM
2021-10-10 02:41:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bryan Simmons
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Did you invite them in...
Hey, I bet they used internal combustion engine lawn equipment!
Mother Gaia is probably feeling like Angel Smalls right about now.
She got it...
--Bryan
I don't know why I still even glance at this garbage, but I'll admit, I
nearly spit out my drink..
"If we got paid for reading this..."

Lol...
--
GM
Bryan Simmons
2021-10-10 11:20:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bryan Simmons
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Did you invite them in...
Hey, I bet they used internal combustion engine lawn equipment!
Mother Gaia is probably feeling like Angel Smalls right about now.
She got it...
--Bryan
I don't know why I still even glance at this garbage, but I'll admit, I
nearly spit out my drink..
You answered your own question. You know, I'm not really as quick
on my feet with jokes as it looks. Folks here just make it too easy.
$849.99! I used to own this book.
https://www.amazon.com/MADS-Snappy-Answers-Stupid-Questions/dp/B006GMWIPG

--Bryan
dsi1
2021-10-10 18:39:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bryan Simmons
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Did you invite them in...
Hey, I bet they used internal combustion engine lawn equipment!
Mother Gaia is probably feeling like Angel Smalls right about now.
She got it...
--Bryan
I don't know why I still even glance at this garbage, but I'll admit, I
nearly spit out my drink..
You answered your own question. You know, I'm not really as quick
on my feet with jokes as it looks. Folks here just make it too easy.
$849.99! I used to own this book.
https://www.amazon.com/MADS-Snappy-Answers-Stupid-Questions/dp/B006GMWIPG
--Bryan
I used to have that book. Reading it was one of the high points of my life. It's well worth $849.99!!!
jmcquown
2021-10-10 15:46:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bryan Simmons
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Did you invite them in...
Hey, I bet they used internal combustion engine lawn equipment!
Mother Gaia is probably feeling like Angel Smalls right about now.
She got it...
--Bryan
I don't know why I still even glance at this garbage, but I'll admit, I
nearly spit out my drink..
I don't know any lawn service company that is going to bother with
electric equipment. They all use gasoline mowers and they carry cans of
gasoline around on the back of their trucks. Oh, the irony!

Aren't you thrilled John had broccoli again with rice & beans dinner?

Jill
Dave Smith
2021-10-10 16:57:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Michael Trew
I don't know why I still even glance at this garbage, but I'll admit,
I nearly spit out my drink..
I don't know any lawn service company that is going to bother with
electric equipment.  They all use gasoline mowers and they carry cans of
gasoline around on the back of their trucks.  Oh, the irony!
Battery powered equipment is fine for homeowners with one lawn. I have a
good string trimmer and leaf blower set that have pretty good power, but
the battery life is only about 45 minutes. When you see landscape crew
working there are usually 2 or 3 guys working, one or two mowing and one
with the weed trimmer. They might spend a half hour on a job. Their
battery powered tools are going to be almost dead by they time they are
done. Then they need an hour or two to re-charge. The gas powered
equipment is a lot more powerful and when the fuel runs low they just
pour some more gas in and they are ready to go for another hour.
Post by jmcquown
Aren't you thrilled John had broccoli again with rice & beans dinner?
It apparently is not brain food.
Dave Smith
2021-10-10 20:50:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
When you see landscape crew working there are usually 2 or 3 guys
working, one or two mowing and one with the weed trimmer. They
might spend a half hour on a job. The gas powered equipment is a
lot more powerful and when the fuel runs low they just pour some
more gas in and they are ready to go for another hour.
The professional lawn services I see around my neighborhood use those
gas powered blowers that they wear like a backpack. All they have to
do is direct the blowing attachment and not have to carry it in their
hand.
I was referring to all their lawn care equipment..... lawn tractors,
lawn mowers, hedge clippers, string trimmers, chain saws,leaf blowers
etc. It is a considerable investment to buy all the different tools with
compatible batteries and to have enough to get your through a 8-10 hour
day. It is so much easier with gas.
jmcquown
2021-10-10 21:12:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
When you see landscape crew working there are usually 2 or 3 guys
working, one or two mowing and one with the weed trimmer. They
might spend a half hour on a job.  The gas powered equipment is a
lot more powerful and when the fuel runs low they just pour some
more gas in and they are ready to go for another hour.
The professional lawn services I see around my neighborhood use those
gas powered blowers that they wear like a backpack.  All they have to
do is direct the blowing attachment and not have to carry it in their
hand.
I was referring to all their lawn care equipment..... lawn tractors,
lawn mowers, hedge clippers, string trimmers, chain saws,leaf blowers
etc. It is a considerable investment to buy all the different tools with
compatible batteries and to have enough to get your through a 8-10 hour
day.  It is so much easier with gas.
Exactly right. They don't drag electrical cords around behind them and
they don't use rechargeable batteries (I use a cordless leaf blower on
my driveway but that's me as an individual, I'm not running a lawn service).

Gotta wonder why he's paying a company we all know uses the dreaded
gasoline. Did they steal his electric lawn mower too, or did it stop
raining? ;)

Jill
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-10 21:26:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Gotta wonder why he's paying a company we all know uses the dreaded
gasoline. Did they steal his electric lawn mower too, or did it stop
raining? ;)
Jill
As much as he yaps about "Mother Gaia" I'm wondering why he doesn't
insist on them using his electric lawn mower and furnish them with the
power cords to use his Barbie mower?? I bet Mom G is pissed at him!!!
Bryan Simmons
2021-10-10 23:56:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
Gotta wonder why he's paying a company we all know uses the dreaded
gasoline. Did they steal his electric lawn mower too, or did it stop
raining? ;)
Jill
As much as he yaps about "Mother Gaia" I'm wondering why he doesn't
insist on them using his electric lawn mower and furnish them with the
power cords to use his Barbie mower?? I bet Mom G is pissed at him!!!
His courtship of Mother Gaia is souring. Like his ex, she's not receptive to
buggery. Did he move an underage Mother Gaia into a mobile home at the
end of a gravel road? Did it stink of ferrets? WAIT!! That wasn't Mother
Gaia!! That was the ungrateful bitch. I'm confused and wobbly. Bring me
my Angel.

--Bryan
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-10 23:37:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 16:50:33 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
When you see landscape crew working there are usually 2 or 3 guys
working, one or two mowing and one with the weed trimmer. They
might spend a half hour on a job. The gas powered equipment is a
lot more powerful and when the fuel runs low they just pour some
more gas in and they are ready to go for another hour.
The professional lawn services I see around my neighborhood use those
gas powered blowers that they wear like a backpack. All they have to
do is direct the blowing attachment and not have to carry it in their
hand.
I was referring to all their lawn care equipment..... lawn tractors,
lawn mowers, hedge clippers, string trimmers, chain saws,leaf blowers
etc. It is a considerable investment to buy all the different tools with
compatible batteries and to have enough to get your through a 8-10 hour
day. It is so much easier with gas.
Not always, for small jobs rechargeable batteries are more efficient,
safer, and cost less. We string trim the perimeter of ten acres and
rechargeable battery string trimmers are much better than gasolene
trimmers, they weigh less, no noise, and no fumes in your face... also
far less maintenence. Rechargeable battery yard tools are far
superior in every respect. Most importantly keeping a supply of
gasolene around is dangerous, plus holding gasolene too long it goes
bad. We've changed all our yard tools to rechargeable battery models,
they are far better than gasolene in every respect. For heavy duty
jobs gasolene tools have more power but when jobs are not let go they
don't become heavy duty. Rechargeable battery chain saws are like a
mirical, especialy for pole saws. It's a whole lot easier to pull a
trigger to start than to pull a string to start until you rip your
guts out and it still won't start without doing major maintenence.
Electric yard tools are a mirical and you don't need to be like idiot
Koochie with 100' extention cords.
Not two minutes ago my next door neighbor phoned, his riding lawnmower
is bogged down in mud, I told him I'll be there tomorow with my
tractor to pull him out. Those riding lawn mowers have no power, they
have small tires, and no four wheel drive... those are fakeo looking
tractors you see lined up at Lowes and Home Depot... they don't even
have a transmission.
Hank Rogers
2021-10-10 23:41:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 16:50:33 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
When you see landscape crew working there are usually 2 or 3 guys
working, one or two mowing and one with the weed trimmer. They
might spend a half hour on a job. The gas powered equipment is a
lot more powerful and when the fuel runs low they just pour some
more gas in and they are ready to go for another hour.
The professional lawn services I see around my neighborhood use those
gas powered blowers that they wear like a backpack. All they have to
do is direct the blowing attachment and not have to carry it in their
hand.
I was referring to all their lawn care equipment..... lawn tractors,
lawn mowers, hedge clippers, string trimmers, chain saws,leaf blowers
etc. It is a considerable investment to buy all the different tools with
compatible batteries and to have enough to get your through a 8-10 hour
day. It is so much easier with gas.
Not always, for small jobs rechargeable batteries are more efficient,
safer, and cost less. We string trim the perimeter of ten acres and
rechargeable battery string trimmers are much better than gasolene
trimmers, they weigh less, no noise, and no fumes in your face... also
far less maintenence. Rechargeable battery yard tools are far
superior in every respect. Most importantly keeping a supply of
gasolene around is dangerous, plus holding gasolene too long it goes
bad. We've changed all our yard tools to rechargeable battery models,
they are far better than gasolene in every respect. For heavy duty
jobs gasolene tools have more power but when jobs are not let go they
don't become heavy duty. Rechargeable battery chain saws are like a
mirical, especialy for pole saws. It's a whole lot easier to pull a
trigger to start than to pull a string to start until you rip your
guts out and it still won't start without doing major maintenence.
Electric yard tools are a mirical and you don't need to be like idiot
Koochie with 100' extention cords.
Not two minutes ago my next door neighbor phoned, his riding lawnmower
is bogged down in mud, I told him I'll be there tomorow with my
tractor to pull him out. Those riding lawn mowers have no power, they
have small tires, and no four wheel drive... those are fakeo looking
tractors you see lined up at Lowes and Home Depot... they don't even
have a transmission.
Yoose have only the finest lawn equipment Popeye. I guess it's
because yoose so highly educated.
Dave Smith
2021-10-11 00:00:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 16:50:33 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
When you see landscape crew working there are usually 2 or 3 guys
working, one or two mowing and one with the weed trimmer. They
might spend a half hour on a job. The gas powered equipment is a
lot more powerful and when the fuel runs low they just pour some
more gas in and they are ready to go for another hour.
The professional lawn services I see around my neighborhood use those
gas powered blowers that they wear like a backpack. All they have to
do is direct the blowing attachment and not have to carry it in their
hand.
I was referring to all their lawn care equipment..... lawn tractors,
lawn mowers, hedge clippers, string trimmers, chain saws,leaf blowers
etc. It is a considerable investment to buy all the different tools with
compatible batteries and to have enough to get your through a 8-10 hour
day. It is so much easier with gas.
Not always, for small jobs rechargeable batteries are more efficient,
safer, and cost less. We string trim the perimeter of ten acres and
rechargeable battery string trimmers are much better than gasolene
trimmers, they weigh less, no noise, and no fumes in your face... also
far less maintenence. Rechargeable battery yard tools are far
superior in every respect. Most importantly keeping a supply of
gasolene around is dangerous, plus holding gasolene too long it goes
bad. We've changed all our yard tools to rechargeable battery models,
they are far better than gasolene in every respect. For heavy duty
jobs gasolene tools have more power but when jobs are not let go they
don't become heavy duty. Rechargeable battery chain saws are like a
mirical, especialy for pole saws. It's a whole lot easier to pull a
trigger to start than to pull a string to start until you rip your
guts out and it still won't start without doing major maintenence.
Electric yard tools are a mirical and you don't need to be like idiot
Koochie with 100' extention cords.
Not two minutes ago my next door neighbor phoned, his riding lawnmower
is bogged down in mud, I told him I'll be there tomorow with my
tractor to pull him out. Those riding lawn mowers have no power, they
have small tires, and no four wheel drive... those are fakeo looking
tractors you see lined up at Lowes and Home Depot... they don't even
have a transmission.
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their tools
all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a battery powered
yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours or more
Hank Rogers
2021-10-11 00:59:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 16:50:33 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
When you see landscape crew working there are usually 2 or 3 guys
working, one or two mowing and one with the weed trimmer. They
might spend a half hour on a job.  The gas powered equipment is a
lot more powerful and when the fuel runs low they just pour some
more gas in and they are ready to go for another hour.
The professional lawn services I see around my neighborhood use those
gas powered blowers that they wear like a backpack.  All they
have to
do is direct the blowing attachment and not have to carry it in their
hand.
I was referring to all their lawn care equipment..... lawn
tractors,
lawn mowers, hedge clippers, string trimmers, chain saws,leaf blowers
etc. It is a considerable investment to buy all the different tools with
compatible batteries and to have enough to get your through a 8-10 hour
day.  It is so much easier with gas.
Not always, for small jobs rechargeable batteries are more
efficient,
safer, and cost less.  We string trim the perimeter of ten acres and
rechargeable battery string trimmers are much better than gasolene
trimmers, they weigh less, no noise, and no fumes in your face... also
far less maintenence.  Rechargeable battery yard tools are far
superior in every respect.  Most importantly keeping a supply of
gasolene around is dangerous, plus holding gasolene too long it goes
bad.  We've changed all our yard tools to rechargeable battery
models,
they are far better than gasolene in every respect.  For heavy duty
jobs gasolene tools have more power but when jobs are not let go they
don't become heavy duty.  Rechargeable battery chain saws are like a
mirical, especialy for pole saws. It's a whole lot easier to pull a
trigger to start than to pull a string to start until you rip your
guts out and it still won't start without doing major maintenence.
Electric yard tools are a mirical and you don't need to be like idiot
Koochie with 100' extention cords.
Not two minutes ago my next door neighbor phoned, his riding
lawnmower
is bogged down in mud, I told him I'll be there tomorow with my
tractor to pull him out.  Those riding lawn mowers have no power,
they
have small tires, and no four wheel drive... those are fakeo looking
tractors you see lined up at Lowes and Home Depot... they don't even
have a transmission.
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their
tools all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a
battery powered  yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8
hours or more
Don't argue with Popeye. He's much more educated than yoose.
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-11 14:30:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 16:50:33 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
When you see landscape crew working there are usually 2 or 3 guys
working, one or two mowing and one with the weed trimmer. They
might spend a half hour on a job. The gas powered equipment is a
lot more powerful and when the fuel runs low they just pour some
more gas in and they are ready to go for another hour.
The professional lawn services I see around my neighborhood use those
gas powered blowers that they wear like a backpack. All they have to
do is direct the blowing attachment and not have to carry it in their
hand.
I was referring to all their lawn care equipment..... lawn tractors,
lawn mowers, hedge clippers, string trimmers, chain saws,leaf blowers
etc. It is a considerable investment to buy all the different tools with
compatible batteries and to have enough to get your through a 8-10 hour
day. It is so much easier with gas.
Not always, for small jobs rechargeable batteries are more efficient,
safer, and cost less. We string trim the perimeter of ten acres and
rechargeable battery string trimmers are much better than gasolene
trimmers, they weigh less, no noise, and no fumes in your face... also
far less maintenence. Rechargeable battery yard tools are far
superior in every respect. Most importantly keeping a supply of
gasolene around is dangerous, plus holding gasolene too long it goes
bad. We've changed all our yard tools to rechargeable battery models,
they are far better than gasolene in every respect. For heavy duty
jobs gasolene tools have more power but when jobs are not let go they
don't become heavy duty. Rechargeable battery chain saws are like a
mirical, especialy for pole saws. It's a whole lot easier to pull a
trigger to start than to pull a string to start until you rip your
guts out and it still won't start without doing major maintenence.
Electric yard tools are a mirical and you don't need to be like idiot
Koochie with 100' extention cords.
Not two minutes ago my next door neighbor phoned, his riding lawnmower
is bogged down in mud, I told him I'll be there tomorow with my
tractor to pull him out. Those riding lawn mowers have no power, they
have small tires, and no four wheel drive... those are fakeo looking
tractors you see lined up at Lowes and Home Depot... they don't even
have a transmission.
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their tools
all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a battery powered
yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one available...
takes less than a half hour to charge a battery. I've been using B&D,
all their tools use the same battery. We have three batteries and one
charger Their tools come with a battery, we bought the charger and
one extra battery... we have two weed whackers so we can work at the
same time. Takes less than a half hour to charge the battery and it
lasts over an hour. We have their pole saw, actually cuts with a
small light weight chain saw, an excellent tool. We have their
regular 14" chain saw, works great. Those battery operated tools are
perfect for light yard work... most lawn service crews only do light
yard work, they're not lumberjacks... easy to prune an average tree
with their pole saw... it'll lop off a 6" limb.
Michael Trew
2021-10-11 15:49:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their tools
all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a battery powered
yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one available...
takes less than a half hour to charge a battery. I've been using B&D,
all their tools use the same battery.
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-11 18:10:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:49:19 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their tools
all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a battery powered
yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one available...
takes less than a half hour to charge a battery. I've been using B&D,
all their tools use the same battery.
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
And I've never seen a professional use rechargeable stuff. Always
petrol (gas). Hopefully in the future.
dsi1
2021-10-11 18:38:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:49:19 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their tools
all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a battery powered
yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one available...
takes less than a half hour to charge a battery. I've been using B&D,
all their tools use the same battery.
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
And I've never seen a professional use rechargeable stuff. Always
petrol (gas). Hopefully in the future.
My brother says that the yard guys that work on his house use electric tools. He says it's very quiet. I'm assuming that it's all rechargeable tools. I don't know how they charge their batteries but it ain't my kuleana anyway. Of course it's just a tiny bit of lawn on the top of a rock in the middle of the ocean. They might be able to work on the entire island on a single charge.
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-11 18:53:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:49:19 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their tools
all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a battery powered
yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one available...
takes less than a half hour to charge a battery. I've been using B&D,
all their tools use the same battery.
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
And I've never seen a professional use rechargeable stuff. Always
petrol (gas). Hopefully in the future.
My brother says that the yard guys that work on his house use electric tools. He says it's very quiet. I'm assuming that it's all rechargeable tools. I don't know how they charge their batteries but it ain't my kuleana anyway. Of course it's just a tiny bit of lawn on the top of a rock in the middle of the ocean. They might be able to work on the entire island on a single charge.
https://dlisted.com/2021/10/11/hot-sluts-of-the-day-281/

Hot Sluts Of The Day!

October 11, 2021 / Posted by: Michael K

Angel and Halo, the cat and guinea pig who are best of friends!

In that picture above, Angel the cat and Halo the guinea pig may be making the same blank
expression you make when you’re on a shitty first date, have nothing to say to the trick, and
are awkwardly waiting for the bill to come so you can get out of there. But no, Angel and Halo
are just shy about their love! Because according to People, Angel and Halo are cuddle friends
who are now in their forever home where they’ll cuddle forever!

Angel and Halo were brought into the Charlotte Mecklenburg Animal Control in Charlotte, North
Carolina by their former owner who was dealing with personal issues and could no longer care for
them. But Angel and Halo’s former owner said that their hearts are bonded to each other’s and
that they should be adopted together. Julia Conner of CMPD Animal Care & Control tells People that
usually cats will see a guinea pig as their next meal so she’s never met a cat/guinea pig couple
before. And four-year-old-ish Angel and two-year-old-ish Halo have their own language, which I’m
guessing consists of Halo regularly flinching like, “Girl, you haven’t changed your mind
about NOT eating me, right?”

“We get bonded pairs here at the shelter often, but it’s usually like cats and dogs — most of the
time— a cat and a guinea pig that’s usually a prey situation. The cat would normally be chasing
the guinea pig, so to see them together as best friends is very rare,” Conner adds.

“It’s entertaining to watch them. They try to communicate with each other. Cats and dogs
have their own language, so to see two species who have their own way of communicating
is very entertaining. You get that moment of ‘Oh my gosh, oh that’s so cute!’ ” Conner says.

After CMPD posted about Angel and Halo, they got several adoption requests from all over.
And Angel and Halo were recently adopted together! Here’s another adorable picture of the
most adorable odd couple, and yes, Angel is probably making wide eyes because she’s afraid
that this picture is going to get out, and then she’ll never hear the end of it from the pussy community!

Aww, if a cat and guinea pig can find love within each other, then that means there’s hope for
us all to find eternal pure love!!!! (“Um, bitch, don’t act like you’re not going to die alone,” said
the voice of reason to me.)
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-11 20:43:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:49:19 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their tools
all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a battery powered
yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one available...
takes less than a half hour to charge a battery. I've been using B&D,
all their tools use the same battery.
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
Typical professional landscapers use the least expensive tools they
can find, very often they buy used. Just because a shovel costs $100
and has a gold plated handle doesn't make it a bit better than a $10
shovel. All those yard work tools are made in the same factory in
China. No landscaping job requires brain surgery tools. Most people
who work in people's homes charge according to the price of their
posessions. Someone with an old clunker in their driveway will pay
substantially less to have their lawn mowed than the guy down the
street with a new Lexus in his driveway. When we have workmen come
here to give an estimate, whether woodworking, plumbing, electrical,
we hide our two Kubotas. Next week someone will be here to give an
estimate for power washing our house and clean our windows, both
Kubotas will be hidden in our barn.

B&D makes the same or better quality tools than the top name
companies. B&D has been in business a very long time, they make
several grades of tools... buy the quality level one needs to mow
their weeds. Very few homeowners have a country club lawn. Most Golf
courses maintain with Kubotas. I bought ours nearly 20 years ago, I
paid $55,000... today it would sell for twice that... more with the
added on implements... the finishing mower and snow plow would run
$50,000 today.
Most professional auto mechanics have a canvas bag filled with crappy
tools, very few will have a set of Snap On.

Most people who work as landscapers never graduated from High School,
that's why they mow lawns.... if all they do is yard work they are day
laborers, not landscapers.
Hank Rogers
2021-10-11 20:55:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:49:19 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their tools
all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a battery powered
yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one available...
takes less than a half hour to charge a battery. I've been using B&D,
all their tools use the same battery.
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
Typical professional landscapers use the least expensive tools they
can find, very often they buy used. Just because a shovel costs $100
and has a gold plated handle doesn't make it a bit better than a $10
shovel. All those yard work tools are made in the same factory in
China. No landscaping job requires brain surgery tools. Most people
who work in people's homes charge according to the price of their
posessions. Someone with an old clunker in their driveway will pay
substantially less to have their lawn mowed than the guy down the
street with a new Lexus in his driveway. When we have workmen come
here to give an estimate, whether woodworking, plumbing, electrical,
we hide our two Kubotas. Next week someone will be here to give an
estimate for power washing our house and clean our windows, both
Kubotas will be hidden in our barn.
B&D makes the same or better quality tools than the top name
companies. B&D has been in business a very long time, they make
several grades of tools... buy the quality level one needs to mow
their weeds. Very few homeowners have a country club lawn. Most Golf
courses maintain with Kubotas. I bought ours nearly 20 years ago, I
paid $55,000... today it would sell for twice that... more with the
added on implements... the finishing mower and snow plow would run
$50,000 today.
Most professional auto mechanics have a canvas bag filled with crappy
tools, very few will have a set of Snap On.
Most people who work as landscapers never graduated from High School,
that's why they mow lawns.... if all they do is yard work they are day
laborers, not landscapers.
Yoose ave the finest shit in the universe Popeye.

And yoose so educated!
Dave Smith
2021-10-12 00:55:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:49:19 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
Typical professional landscapers use the least expensive tools they
can find, very often they buy used. Just because a shovel costs $100
and has a gold plated handle doesn't make it a bit better than a $10
shovel. All those yard work tools are made in the same factory in
China. No landscaping job requires brain surgery tools. Most people
who work in people's homes charge according to the price of their
posessions. Someone with an old clunker in their driveway will pay
substantially less to have their lawn mowed than the guy down the
street with a new Lexus in his driveway. When we have workmen come
here to give an estimate, whether woodworking, plumbing, electrical,
we hide our two Kubotas. Next week someone will be here to give an
estimate for power washing our house and clean our windows, both
Kubotas will be hidden in our barn.
You must be in a different universe than I do. The landscapers around
here use good tools. Most of them are hard working Dutchmen who pride
themselves in their tools and buy top quality because they know they
will last.
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
Most professional auto mechanics have a canvas bag filled with crappy
tools, very few will have a set of Snap On.
Bullshit again. Most professional mechanics have good quality tools
and keep them in high quality rolling tool chests. They buy a lot of
them from the Snap-On guys that come around regularly.
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-12 18:40:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
Typical professional landscapers use the least expensive tools they
can find, very often they buy used. Just because a shovel costs $100
and has a gold plated handle doesn't make it a bit better than a $10
shovel. All those yard work tools are made in the same factory in
China. No landscaping job requires brain surgery tools. Most people
who work in people's homes charge according to the price of their
posessions. Someone with an old clunker in their driveway will pay
substantially less to have their lawn mowed than the guy down the
street with a new Lexus in his driveway. When we have workmen come
here to give an estimate, whether woodworking, plumbing, electrical,
we hide our two Kubotas. Next week someone will be here to give an
estimate for power washing our house and clean our windows, both
Kubotas will be hidden in our barn.
You must be in a different universe than I do. The landscapers around
here use good tools. Most of them are hard working Dutchmen who pride
themselves in their tools and buy top quality because they know they
will last.
You're confusing lawn care with gardeners and arborists. People who
drive around in pickup trucks mowing lawns in most cases can't read or
write, most don't speak English. They don't need an education to mow
lawns and rake leaves. It's wise to not allow those guys to prune
your trees and shrubery, they'll butcher the job... most can't tell an
apple tree from a peach tree. At our last house on Lung Guyland we
had a lawn service, we had a bit more than 1/4 acre of lawn and they
charged us $25 dollars a month for mowing and edging once a week, plus
they took the clippings away. Twice a season they fertilized and put
down weed killer. A crew of four arrived and did several houses on
the block, one after the other, about twenty minutes each. Was well
worth it as it took me a 2-3 hours to do it myself... and I no longer
had to maintain a lawn mower and edger. Only the boss, Fabian, spoke
English... amongst themselves they spoke Rican Spanish.
Post by Dave Smith
Most professional auto mechanics have a canvas bag filled with crappy
tools, very few will have a set of Snap On.
Bullshit again. Most professional mechanics have good quality tools
and keep them in high quality rolling tool chests. They buy a lot of
them from the Snap-On guys that come around regularly.
Auto mechanics who work at a dealership are in most cases
supplied all tools/meters by the dealership and receive ongoing
training paid for by the dealership. Dealershps typically have a tool
crib where employees check out tools and leave a chit. Most
dealerships prefer mechanics don't bring personal tools to the job. A
lot of dealerships supply a rollaway fitted out with tools needed for
the job. On schedule measuring tools are checked for accuracy and
recalibrated/replaced as necessasary.

People who work on vehicales in their driveway are grease monkeys and
have grease monkey tools. There's not much a self-proclaimed auto
mechanic can do on late model cars anymore. They can't perform a state
auto inspection. There are still some grease monkey shops around,
they are basically capable of fixing a flat tire, replacing a broken
fan belt, and installing a muffler. Most times they repair a flat by
installing a tube and never tell the owner, then a serious high speed
blowout occurs.
They no longer work on engines and transmissions. Most of those
grease monkey shops are not licensed to tow a disabled vehical. Most
don't own a tow truck, grease monkeys in the area share the use of
someone with a flatbed.
We have a couple of grease monkey shops in town but we no longer go to
them, we're much better off going to the Toyota dealership, it's a
little longer trip but well worth saving the aggrivation from getting
a lousy do-over job from the grease monkeys... and actually going to
the grease monkeys ends up costing more to undo their errors. Grease
monkeys don't have any better auto tools than the typical home owner
who strips threads and and rounds hex nuts working on their lawnmower.
BTW, Snapon doesn't have the best tools, they're only the best for
those wanting shiney-pretty... there are much better quality socket
sets for those who don't mind a matte black finish.
Dave Smith
2021-10-12 20:24:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Dave Smith
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost guarantee
that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools. As the contractor
that I used to work for would say, those are "home owner tools".
Landscapers and professionals would be using more expensive brands, and
commercial grade tools.
Typical professional landscapers use the least expensive tools they
can find, very often they buy used. Just because a shovel costs $100
and has a gold plated handle doesn't make it a bit better than a $10
shovel. All those yard work tools are made in the same factory in
China. No landscaping job requires brain surgery tools. Most people
who work in people's homes charge according to the price of their
posessions. Someone with an old clunker in their driveway will pay
substantially less to have their lawn mowed than the guy down the
street with a new Lexus in his driveway. When we have workmen come
here to give an estimate, whether woodworking, plumbing, electrical,
we hide our two Kubotas. Next week someone will be here to give an
estimate for power washing our house and clean our windows, both
Kubotas will be hidden in our barn.
You must be in a different universe than I do. The landscapers around
here use good tools. Most of them are hard working Dutchmen who pride
themselves in their tools and buy top quality because they know they
will last.
You're confusing lawn care with gardeners and arborists.
That is a hell of a leap in logic because I never mention arborists.





People who
Post by Sheldon Martin
drive around in pickup trucks mowing lawns in most cases can't read or
write, most don't speak English. They don't need an education to mow
lawns and rake leaves. It's wise to not allow those guys to prune
your trees and shrubery, they'll butcher the job... most can't tell an
apple tree from a peach tree. At our last house on Lung Guyland we
had a lawn service, we had a bit more than 1/4 acre of lawn and they
charged us $25 dollars a month for mowing and edging once a week, plus
they took the clippings away. Twice a season they fertilized and put
down weed killer. A crew of four arrived and did several houses on
the block, one after the other, about twenty minutes each. Was well
worth it as it took me a 2-3 hours to do it myself... and I no longer
had to maintain a lawn mower and edger. Only the boss, Fabian, spoke
English... amongst themselves they spoke Rican Spanish.
I just got back from the dog park and the landscaping crew was there for
the weekly mowing. There were two pickup trucks and one trailer. They
had two stand on mowers and a racked loaded with gas powered string
trimmers.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Dave Smith
Most professional auto mechanics have a canvas bag filled with crappy
tools, very few will have a set of Snap On.
Bullshit again. Most professional mechanics have good quality tools
and keep them in high quality rolling tool chests. They buy a lot of
them from the Snap-On guys that come around regularly.
Auto mechanics who work at a dealership are in most cases
supplied all tools/meters by the dealership and receive ongoing
training paid for by the dealership.
More bullshit. Shops may have specialized tools and electronic testers,
but auto mechanics almost always provide their own tools. I worked in a
shop about 20 heavy duty mechanics and also dealt with a lot of the
private shops that we contracted work to. My brother was a truck
mechanic. They all had their own tools.



Dealershps typically have a tool
Post by Sheldon Martin
crib where employees check out tools and leave a chit. Most
dealerships prefer mechanics don't bring personal tools to the job. A
lot of dealerships supply a rollaway fitted out with tools needed for
the job. On schedule measuring tools are checked for accuracy and
recalibrated/replaced as necessasary.
Only the specialty tools. Wrenches, pliers, screw drivers etc were all
privately owned by the mechanics, and they bought their own rolling tool
chests and boxes to hold their tools.
Michael Trew
2021-10-13 04:52:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Sheldon Martin
Most professional auto mechanics have a canvas bag filled with crappy
tools, very few will have a set of Snap On.
Bullshit again. Most professional mechanics have good quality tools
and keep them in high quality rolling tool chests. They buy a lot of
them from the Snap-On guys that come around regularly.
People who work on vehicales in their driveway are grease monkeys and
have grease monkey tools. There's not much a self-proclaimed auto
mechanic can do on late model cars anymore. They can't perform a state
auto inspection. There are still some grease monkey shops around,
they are basically capable of fixing a flat tire, replacing a broken
fan belt, and installing a muffler. Most times they repair a flat by
installing a tube and never tell the owner, then a serious high speed
blowout occurs.
They no longer work on engines and transmissions.
That's why I like older cars! Much anything newer than your early 90's
Landcruiser is literally designed so the shade tree mechanic, or "grease
monkey", can no longer work on it. Count me out. I do my own work, and
when I can't -- I take it to a "grease monkey" shop in town that does
exhaust work primarily, but they will weld (which I don't do) and do
other tasks, from brakes to suspension, etc. They are reliable, trusty
people, and they work at good rates. One guy there will work on my car
after hours for a lesser rate even, but it takes longer to get it done.
Gary
2021-10-13 12:32:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Most times they repair a flat by
installing a tube and never tell the owner, then a serious high speed
blowout occurs.
I believe that's backwards, Sheldon.
I had tubes in my first van just to prevent blowouts.

A blowout is an immediate loss of air and a steering hazard.
If you have tubes, a puncture will deflate the tube but the air is still
kept in the tire.

You still get a flat but not an immediate blowout.

IMO, everyone should put tubes in their 2 front tires. Back tires, not
so important.

I worked briefly at a truck stop years ago. Most of those 18-wheelers
had tubes in their front tires.
cshenk
2021-10-17 02:55:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
On Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:49:19 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
You might be correct about some landscapers, but I can almost
guarantee that they would NOT be using Black and Decker tools.
As the contractor that I used to work for would say, those are
"home owner tools". Landscapers and professionals would be using
more expensive brands, and commercial grade tools.
Typical professional landscapers use the least expensive tools they
can find, very often they buy used. Just because a shovel costs
$100 and has a gold plated handle doesn't make it a bit better than
a $10 shovel. All those yard work tools are made in the same
factory in China. No landscaping job requires brain surgery tools.
Most people who work in people's homes charge according to the
price of their posessions. Someone with an old clunker in their
driveway will pay substantially less to have their lawn mowed than
the guy down the street with a new Lexus in his driveway. When we
have workmen come here to give an estimate, whether woodworking,
plumbing, electrical, we hide our two Kubotas. Next week someone
will be here to give an estimate for power washing our house and
clean our windows, both Kubotas will be hidden in our barn.
You must be in a different universe than I do. The landscapers
around here use good tools. Most of them are hard working Dutchmen
who pride themselves in their tools and buy top quality because they
know they will last.
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
Most professional auto mechanics have a canvas bag filled with
crappy tools, very few will have a set of Snap On.
Bullshit again. Most professional mechanics have good quality tools
and keep them in high quality rolling tool chests. They buy a lot of
them from the Snap-On guys that come around regularly.
He speaks actually more to the level of quality he hires than anything
else.
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-11 17:51:02 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really?? I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards. ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.

They're quite quick doing the yards and move onto to other clients.
I'm not sure how you expect them to charge those tools when they're
doing at least a dozen a day. These are lawn services that have a
variety of lawn mowers, a half dozen weed whackers, and several
leaf blowers. They're not going to be juggling rechargeable batteries
for their tools.
Dave Smith
2021-10-11 19:56:32 UTC
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Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really?? I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards. ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
That makes at least two of us who live in a universe that is the
opposite of Sheldon's.
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-11 22:30:04 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really?? I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards. ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
That makes at least two of us who live in a universe that is the
opposite of Sheldon's.
Just today the people across the street had their lawn service doing
their yard and everything was gas powered. As I'm writing this I can
hear another lawn mower several doors away and it's definitely gas
powered.
jmcquown
2021-10-11 21:02:39 UTC
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Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really?? I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards. ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
They're quite quick doing the yards and move onto to other clients.
I'm not sure how you expect them to charge those tools when they're
doing at least a dozen a day. These are lawn services that have a
variety of lawn mowers, a half dozen weed whackers, and several
leaf blowers. They're not going to be juggling rechargeable batteries
for their tools.
I haven't seen that either, and believe me landscaping and professional
lawn services are a big business in this area where things grow year
round, no snow, doesn't really get cold. The backpack leaf blowers they
use are definitely gas powered as are the edgers and mowers.

Jill
Graham
2021-10-11 21:22:19 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really??  I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards.  ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
They're quite quick doing the yards and move onto to other clients.
I'm not sure how you expect them to charge those tools when they're
doing at least a dozen a day.  These are lawn services that have a
variety of lawn mowers, a half dozen weed whackers, and several
leaf blowers.  They're not going to be juggling rechargeable batteries
for their tools.
I haven't seen that either, and believe me landscaping and professional
lawn services are a big business in this area where things grow year
round, no snow, doesn't really get cold.  The backpack leaf blowers they
use are definitely gas powered as are the edgers and mowers.
Jill
The lawn guy that I use when I go away for several weeks, clears snow
during the winter.
jmcquown
2021-10-11 21:38:33 UTC
Reply
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Post by Graham
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really??  I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards.  ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
They're quite quick doing the yards and move onto to other clients.
I'm not sure how you expect them to charge those tools when they're
doing at least a dozen a day.  These are lawn services that have a
variety of lawn mowers, a half dozen weed whackers, and several
leaf blowers.  They're not going to be juggling rechargeable batteries
for their tools.
I haven't seen that either, and believe me landscaping and
professional lawn services are a big business in this area where
things grow year round, no snow, doesn't really get cold.  The
backpack leaf blowers they use are definitely gas powered as are the
edgers and mowers.
Jill
The lawn guy that I use when I go away for several weeks, clears snow
during the winter.
Sounds like that would be a requirement in your area. I'm betting he's
not using an electric cordless snow blower. ;)

Jill
Graham
2021-10-11 22:01:50 UTC
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Post by Graham
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really??  I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards.  ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
They're quite quick doing the yards and move onto to other clients.
I'm not sure how you expect them to charge those tools when they're
doing at least a dozen a day.  These are lawn services that have a
variety of lawn mowers, a half dozen weed whackers, and several
leaf blowers.  They're not going to be juggling rechargeable batteries
for their tools.
I haven't seen that either, and believe me landscaping and
professional lawn services are a big business in this area where
things grow year round, no snow, doesn't really get cold.  The
backpack leaf blowers they use are definitely gas powered as are the
edgers and mowers.
Jill
The lawn guy that I use when I go away for several weeks, clears snow
during the winter.
Sounds like that would be a requirement in your area.  I'm betting he's
not using an electric cordless snow blower. ;)
Jill
Hell no! For light falls he uses a gas-powered one. For heavy falls he
uses muscle power!
Ed Pawlowski
2021-10-12 01:05:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really??  I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards.  ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
They're quite quick doing the yards and move onto to other clients.
I'm not sure how you expect them to charge those tools when they're
doing at least a dozen a day.  These are lawn services that have a
variety of lawn mowers, a half dozen weed whackers, and several
leaf blowers.  They're not going to be juggling rechargeable batteries
for their tools.
I haven't seen that either, and believe me landscaping and professional
lawn services are a big business in this area where things grow year
round, no snow, doesn't really get cold.  The backpack leaf blowers they
use are definitely gas powered as are the edgers and mowers.
Jill
That will end in California

https://gizmodo.com/california-is-banning-gas-powered-leaf-blowers-and-lawn-1847841191
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-12 18:44:20 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really??  I find that amazing as several around me have lawn services
do their yards.  ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed whackers,
and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
They're quite quick doing the yards and move onto to other clients.
I'm not sure how you expect them to charge those tools when they're
doing at least a dozen a day.  These are lawn services that have a
variety of lawn mowers, a half dozen weed whackers, and several
leaf blowers.  They're not going to be juggling rechargeable batteries
for their tools.
I haven't seen that either, and believe me landscaping and professional
lawn services are a big business in this area where things grow year
round, no snow, doesn't really get cold.  The backpack leaf blowers they
use are definitely gas powered as are the edgers and mowers.
Jill
That will end in California
https://gizmodo.com/california-is-banning-gas-powered-leaf-blowers-and-lawn-1847841191
Most landscapers in NY already use battery powered tools and have for
a couple of years.
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-12 18:47:10 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by jmcquown
I haven't seen that either, and believe me landscaping and professional
lawn services are a big business in this area where things grow year
round, no snow, doesn't really get cold.  The backpack leaf blowers they
use are definitely gas powered as are the edgers and mowers.
That will end in California
https://gizmodo.com/california-is-banning-gas-powered-leaf-blowers-and-lawn-1847841191
Most landscapers in NY already use battery powered tools and have for
a couple of years.
Maybe for suburban gardens the size of a handkerchief. To make a bit
of room in the garden for Jill's Halloween decorations, for instance.
For real work? I doubt it.
ItsJoan NotJoAnn
2021-10-13 09:16:32 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Most landscapers in NY already use battery powered tools and have for
a couple of years.
You're full of shit, assclown.

https://imgur.com/a/P8uWDmD LOL!
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-13 22:34:47 UTC
Reply
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Post by ItsJoan NotJoAnn
Post by Sheldon Martin
Most landscapers in NY already use battery powered tools and have for
a couple of years.
You're full of shit, assclown.
https://imgur.com/a/P8uWDmD LOL!
Tsk, tsk, tsk.
cshenk
2021-10-17 03:28:50 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools.
Really??  I find that amazing as several around me have lawn
services >>> do their yards.  ALL use gas powered lawn mowers, weed
whackers, >>> and blowers to clear sidewalks of grass clippings.
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by jmcquown
They're quite quick doing the yards and move onto to other
clients. >>> I'm not sure how you expect them to charge those tools
when they're >>> doing at least a dozen a day.  These are lawn
services that have a >>> variety of lawn mowers, a half dozen weed
whackers, and several >>> leaf blowers.  They're not going to be
juggling rechargeable batteries >>> for their tools.
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by jmcquown
I haven't seen that either, and believe me landscaping and
professional >> lawn services are a big business in this area where
things grow year >> round, no snow, doesn't really get cold.  The
backpack leaf blowers they >> use are definitely gas powered as are
the edgers and mowers. >>
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by jmcquown
Jill
That will end in California
https://gizmodo.com/california-is-banning-gas-powered-leaf-blowers-and-lawn-1847841191
Most landscapers in NY already use battery powered tools and have for
a couple of years.
It's a mix-n-match here for the blowers and weed whackers. The ones
with batteries, have several precharged ones.

I asked about it once and was told it's a trade off in weight. The
team doesn't wear out as fast with the lighter units. They have gas
ones as backups but can't do as many yards a day when using them.
Dave Smith
2021-10-11 19:50:37 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their
tools all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a
battery powered yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours
or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one
available... takes less than a half hour to charge a battery.
That's curious because I see a lot of landscaping crews around and I
hear their gas powered tools running. I can't agree about most of them
using battery powered tools when I have never seen one that does.
Gary
2021-10-12 11:03:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their
tools all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a
battery powered yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours
or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one
available... takes less than a half hour to charge a battery.
That's curious because I see a lot of landscaping crews around and I
hear their gas powered tools running. I can't agree about most of them
using battery powered tools when I have never seen one that does.
More likely is that you just don't *hear* the electric tools.
Dave Smith
2021-10-12 16:37:29 UTC
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r more
Post by Gary
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Sheldon Martin
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one
available... takes less than a half hour to charge a battery.
That's curious because I see a lot of landscaping crews around and I
hear their gas powered tools running.  I can't agree about most of them
using battery powered tools when I have never seen one that does.
More likely is that you just don't *hear* the electric tools.
Right. I can't hear the sound of the electric powered tools I don't see
over the sounds of the gas powered equipment that I do see in use.
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-12 17:36:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:00:08 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I was talking about landscaping crews who would be using their
tools all day long. You are lucky to get an hour of use from a
battery powered yard tool. Those guys need them them to run 8 hours
or more
Nowadays most landscapers use rechargeabe battery tools... they have
several batteries so there's always a freshly charged one
available... takes less than a half hour to charge a battery.
That's curious because I see a lot of landscaping crews around and I
hear their gas powered tools running. I can't agree about most of them
using battery powered tools when I have never seen one that does.
More likely is that you just don't *hear* the electric tools.
Electric tools are still too much child's play for professional use.
They have to be noisy and stink. Hopefully, that will change soon.
Sqwertz
2021-10-10 04:09:42 UTC
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While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
Yet somehow, even before paying that $40, you just had your weed
whacker stolen when they whack your weeds for you.

You were flat out lying about just having your "weed whip" stolen in
one of your obnoxiously manic highs.

-sw
Alex
2021-10-10 04:40:29 UTC
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While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
$4 per square foot is expensive and and unemployed/unemployable guy like
you should watch that cash outflow.
GM
2021-10-10 04:51:28 UTC
Reply
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Post by Alex
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
$4 per square foot is expensive and and unemployed/unemployable guy like
you should watch that cash outflow.
Definitely a "luxury" in his case...he'll rue wasting that forty bux when he "really*
needs it...

What's that famous Eugene O'Neill play, "The Taxman Cometh"...???
--
GM
Cindy Hamilton
2021-10-10 09:44:43 UTC
Reply
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Post by Alex
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
$4 per square foot is expensive and and unemployed/unemployable guy like
you should watch that cash outflow.
That is a ton of money. City prices, I guess, or some kind of flat fee
for just showing up.

I got a quote of $1/minute from a lawn guy. It takes me about 90 minutes
to mow my 87120 square feet (minus trees, building, pavement, etc.) No
trimming, which I do only a couple times a year anyway.

That works out to $0.00103 per square foot. And I still thought $90
was too expensive, so I continue to mow my own lawn.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-10 09:52:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 02:44:43 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Alex
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
$4 per square foot is expensive and and unemployed/unemployable guy like
you should watch that cash outflow.
That is a ton of money. City prices, I guess, or some kind of flat fee
for just showing up.
I got a quote of $1/minute from a lawn guy. It takes me about 90 minutes
to mow my 87120 square feet (minus trees, building, pavement, etc.) No
trimming, which I do only a couple times a year anyway.
That works out to $0.00103 per square foot. And I still thought $90
was too expensive, so I continue to mow my own lawn.
So would he charge $90 total or would he charge an additional call out
fee (as I think they call it here)?
Cindy Hamilton
2021-10-10 10:12:22 UTC
Reply
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Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 02:44:43 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Alex
While I'm preparing my Broccoli- based VSTD Meal!
$40 for the front and back!
John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
$4 per square foot is expensive and and unemployed/unemployable guy like
you should watch that cash outflow.
That is a ton of money. City prices, I guess, or some kind of flat fee
for just showing up.
I got a quote of $1/minute from a lawn guy. It takes me about 90 minutes
to mow my 87120 square feet (minus trees, building, pavement, etc.) No
trimming, which I do only a couple times a year anyway.
That works out to $0.00103 per square foot. And I still thought $90
was too expensive, so I continue to mow my own lawn.
So would he charge $90 total or would he charge an additional call out
fee (as I think they call it here)?
$90 total. The call-out fee is kind of baked into the rate. I'm sure he
includes the time to get his equipment off the trailer and back on.

It wouldn't take him 90 minutes for the actual mowing with his zero-turn-radius
equipment. I spend a fair amount of time backing up while navigating
around obstructions and into weird little corners.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-10 10:21:12 UTC
Reply
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On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 03:12:22 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
On Sun, 10 Oct 2021 02:44:43 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
That is a ton of money. City prices, I guess, or some kind of flat fee
for just showing up.
I got a quote of $1/minute from a lawn guy. It takes me about 90 minutes
to mow my 87120 square feet (minus trees, building, pavement, etc.) No
trimming, which I do only a couple times a year anyway.
That works out to $0.00103 per square foot. And I still thought $90
was too expensive, so I continue to mow my own lawn.
So would he charge $90 total or would he charge an additional call out
fee (as I think they call it here)?
$90 total. The call-out fee is kind of baked into the rate. I'm sure he
includes the time to get his equipment off the trailer and back on.
It wouldn't take him 90 minutes for the actual mowing with his zero-turn-radius
equipment. I spend a fair amount of time backing up while navigating
around obstructions and into weird little corners.
Considering that it's around $123 Australian, I think I'd do it myself
as well.
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