Discussion:
Tenderizing beef with baking soda.
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US Janet
2021-11-23 17:20:42 UTC
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Permalink
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.


https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or

"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."

Janet US
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-23 20:19:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
On "America's Test Kitchen/Cooks Country" they've advocated using baking
soda many times on their shows.
US Janet
2021-11-23 23:06:59 UTC
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Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
On "America's Test Kitchen/Cooks Country" they've advocated using baking
soda many times on their shows.
yep!
dsi1
2021-11-23 20:27:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir fry dishes. It works awesome.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/y8GUaGdX5cKSkxYv9
Michael Trew
2021-11-24 17:47:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir fry dishes. It works awesome.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y8GUaGdX5cKSkxYv9
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet? Lol
jmcquown
2021-11-24 19:46:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't
care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do
that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir
fry dishes. It works awesome.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y8GUaGdX5cKSkxYv9
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?  Lol
Ever seen cube steaks? They're run through a tenderizing machine.

Jill
heyjoe
2021-11-25 14:53:19 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?  Lol
Ever seen cube steaks? They're run through a tenderizing machine.
For the home cook, look for a jaccard meat tenderizer, e.g.
<https://www.amazon.com/Jaccard-200348-Supertendermatic-48-Blade-Tenderizer/dp/B001347JK6>
--
"I jotted down three names: Julia Child, Mr. Wizard and Monty Python"
A. Brown
jmcquown
2021-11-25 15:11:23 UTC
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Post by heyjoe
Post by jmcquown
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?� Lol
Ever seen cube steaks? They're run through a tenderizing machine.
For the home cook, look for a jaccard meat tenderizer, e.g.
<https://www.amazon.com/Jaccard-200348-Supertendermatic-48-Blade-Tenderizer/dp/B001347JK6>
That's fun! :)

Jill
heyjoe
2021-11-25 18:24:07 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by heyjoe
Post by jmcquown
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?ᅵ Lol
Ever seen cube steaks? They're run through a tenderizing machine.
For the home cook, look for a jaccard meat tenderizer, e.g.
<https://www.amazon.com/Jaccard-200348-Supertendermatic-48-Blade-Tenderizer/dp/B001347JK6>
That's fun! :)
Jill
I was thinking that was something left over from the Spanish
Inquisition, but "jaccard" doesn't strike me as a Spanish word.
--
American institutions are telling the American public what they
clearly see and understand to be true, is in fact - not true.

For example - Inflation is only "temporary"
The withdrawal from Afghanistan was an "extraordinary success"
The "Build Back Better" agenda costs zero dollars"
Let's go Brandon
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-25 23:18:59 UTC
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Post by heyjoe
Post by jmcquown
Post by heyjoe
Post by jmcquown
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?� Lol
Ever seen cube steaks? They're run through a tenderizing machine.
For the home cook, look for a jaccard meat tenderizer, e.g.
<https://www.amazon.com/Jaccard-200348-Supertendermatic-48-Blade-Tenderizer/dp/B001347JK6>
That's fun! :)
Jill
I was thinking that was something left over from the Spanish
Inquisition, but "jaccard" doesn't strike me as a Spanish word.
Swiss origin

https://www.nameslist.org/surname/Jaccard
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-26 00:01:12 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by heyjoe
Post by jmcquown
Post by heyjoe
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?� Lol
Ever seen cube steaks? They're run through a tenderizing machine.
For the home cook, look for a jaccard meat tenderizer, e.g.
<https://www.amazon.com/Jaccard-200348-Supertendermatic-48-Blade-Tenderizer/dp/B001347JK6>
That's fun! :)
Jill
I was thinking that was something left over from the Spanish
Inquisition, but "jaccard" doesn't strike me as a Spanish word.
Swiss origin
https://www.nameslist.org/surname/Jaccard
Yep, the Swiss know how to tenderize their steak. Of course, while
rfc has no Swiss posters, we have Americans, Canadians, Brits,
and Aussies--though no one can beat his meat like our resident
pervert nurse.

--Bryan
jmcquown
2021-11-26 01:33:56 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by heyjoe
Post by jmcquown
Post by heyjoe
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?� Lol
Ever seen cube steaks?  They're run through a tenderizing machine.
For the home cook, look for a jaccard meat tenderizer, e.g.
<https://www.amazon.com/Jaccard-200348-Supertendermatic-48-Blade-Tenderizer/dp/B001347JK6>
That's fun! :)
Jill
I was thinking that was something left over from the Spanish
Inquisition, but "jaccard" doesn't strike me as a Spanish word.
Swiss origin
https://www.nameslist.org/surname/Jaccard
Jaccard is a pattern type on a woman's blouse. :)

Jill
S Viemeister
2021-11-26 03:24:41 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by heyjoe
I was thinking that was something left over from the Spanish
Inquisition, but "jaccard" doesn't strike me as a Spanish word.
Swiss origin
https://www.nameslist.org/surname/Jaccard
Jaccard is a pattern type on a woman's blouse. :)
Different spelling - jacquard. Not so much a pattern 'type', as a
mechanism, invented by a Frenchman named Jacquard.
jmcquown
2021-11-26 18:37:51 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by dsi1
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't
care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do
that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir
fry dishes. It works awesome.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y8GUaGdX5cKSkxYv9
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?
Lol
Ever seen cube steaks? They're run through a tenderizing machine.
Jill
Ah, yes, I wondered how they got that texture.  I figured they did
something like that to cheap, tough cuts of meat to make them more usable.
That's exactly the reason. The odd thing I've found is cube steaks,
which even after run through the tenderizer machine more than once,
never get tender, yet they are expensive. I'll buy a more expensive
cuts of meat before I waste money with something like cube(d) steaks.

Jill
bruce bowser
2021-11-25 15:34:36 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by dsi1
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't
care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do
that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir
fry dishes. It works awesome.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y8GUaGdX5cKSkxYv9
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?
Lol
Close. They run it through a machine with a lot of teeth on it to
pierce and break up the muscle. I do use a mallet type thing to make
piccata and thin the meat.
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
Dave Smith
2021-11-25 17:47:26 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
jmcquown
2021-11-25 17:53:37 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 2:45:35 PM UTC-5,
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
I posted my mother's recipe not long ago and Michael tried it. He's
made it more recently than I have. I was criticized for saying used
crumbled bay leaf to make the paste for the sauce. Okay, I wrote it as
my mother did. And as I'd made it. No one in my family ever choked on
a shard of bay leaf. But if it makes everyone feel better use ground
bay leaf powder. :)

Jill
Michael Trew
2021-11-26 17:06:00 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 2:45:35 PM UTC-5,
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
I posted my mother's recipe not long ago and Michael tried it. He's made
it more recently than I have. I was criticized for saying used crumbled
bay leaf to make the paste for the sauce. Okay, I wrote it as my mother
did. And as I'd made it. No one in my family ever choked on a shard of
bay leaf. But if it makes everyone feel better use ground bay leaf
powder. :)
Jill
It was good! I didn't know that they made bay leaves into powder. I
broke them up into bitty pieces as you suggested, and I had no issue.
jmcquown
2021-11-26 18:20:49 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 2:45:35 PM UTC-5,
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
I posted my mother's recipe not long ago and Michael tried it. He's made
it more recently than I have. I was criticized for saying used crumbled
bay leaf to make the paste for the sauce. Okay, I wrote it as my mother
did. And as I'd made it. No one in my family ever choked on a shard of
bay leaf. But if it makes everyone feel better use ground bay leaf
powder. :)
Jill
It was good!  I didn't know that they made bay leaves into powder.  I
broke them up into bitty pieces as you suggested, and I had no issue.
You certainly can buy ground/powdered bay leaf. My mom never had a
problem with that recipe using crumbled bay leaf, neither did I and
apparently you didn't, either. None of us ever choked on the bay leaf.
The long slow simmering in the liquid has something to do with it.
When using whole dried bay leaves in soups or stew I definitely remove
the bay leaf before plating. OR, I put them in a tea-ball to dangle in
the soup/stew along with other spices, a bouquet garni.

Jill
US Janet
2021-11-25 18:11:13 UTC
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On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 12:47:26 -0500, Dave Smith
<***@sympatico.ca> wrote:
snip
Post by Dave Smith
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
Yes, my mother too and I don't think I've had it in that length of
time either. I'll have to put it on the To Do list.
Janet US
Michael Trew
2021-11-26 17:08:13 UTC
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Post by US Janet
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 12:47:26 -0500, Dave Smith
snip
Post by Dave Smith
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
Yes, my mother too and I don't think I've had it in that length of
time either. I'll have to put it on the To Do list.
Janet US
Jills mother's recipe was wonderful, it was a nice take on the
tomato-sauce based swiss steak that I usually have. I'd suggest it.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-25 23:15:57 UTC
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Post by US Janet
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 12:47:26 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by bruce bowser
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
Maybe you've had it under the name Austrian steak, German steak or
Albanian steak.
Albanians know how to cook good food

Bruce
2021-11-25 23:59:03 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by US Janet
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 12:47:26 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 2:45:35 PM UTC-5,
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
Maybe you've had it under the name Austrian steak, German steak or
Albanian steak.
Albanians know how to cook good food
http://youtu.be/1A4BOeqaRfA
If you live in the UK, they are more likely running car-wash services.
Or singing very successful songs:

jmcquown
2021-11-26 01:40:15 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by US Janet
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 12:47:26 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 2:45:35 PM UTC-5,
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but I have
not had it in close to 50 years.
Maybe you've had it under the name Austrian steak, German steak or
Albanian steak.
Albanians know how to cook good food
http://youtu.be/1A4BOeqaRfA
That's interesting, Ed! Are those green pods okra? All it said was
"vegetables".

Jill
cshenk
2021-11-27 19:45:56 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by US Janet
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 12:47:26 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
On Wednesday, November 24, 2021 at 2:45:35 PM UTC-5,
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle
for the tougher cut of meat I use when I make something
like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
My mother used to make Swiss steak and it was pretty good, but
I have not had it in close to 50 years.
Maybe you've had it under the name Austrian steak, German steak or
Albanian steak.
Albanians know how to cook good food
http://youtu.be/1A4BOeqaRfA
Post by jmcquown
That's interesting, Ed! Are those green pods okra? All it said was
"vegetables".
Jill
Yes, obviously.

Bruce
2021-11-25 17:51:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 07:34:36 -0800 (PST), bruce bowser
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Michael Trew
Post by dsi1
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't
care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do
that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir
fry dishes. It works awesome.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y8GUaGdX5cKSkxYv9
"Mechanically tenderized"... does that mean beating it with a mallet?
Lol
Close. They run it through a machine with a lot of teeth on it to
pierce and break up the muscle. I do use a mallet type thing to make
piccata and thin the meat.
Yep. I use a mallet to tenderize and break up the muscle for the
tougher cut of meat I use when I make something like Swiss Steak.
I don't think i've ever tried Swiss Steak.
Who knows what it is? Americans use random European country names to
make something sound more interesting.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-25 19:15:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by Bruce
Who knows what it is? Americans use random European country names to
make something sound more interesting.
Swiss:
(transitive) To prepare (meat, fabric, etc.) by rolling or pounding in order to soften it.

Sadly, the etymology is unknown.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce
2021-11-25 19:51:38 UTC
Reply
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On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 11:15:59 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce
Who knows what it is? Americans use random European country names to
make something sound more interesting.
(transitive) To prepare (meat, fabric, etc.) by rolling or pounding in order to soften it.
Sadly, the etymology is unknown.
I bet it has something to do with Switzerland.
US Janet
2021-11-26 03:44:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 11:15:59 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce
Who knows what it is? Americans use random European country names to
make something sound more interesting.
(transitive) To prepare (meat, fabric, etc.) by rolling or pounding in order to soften it.
Sadly, the etymology is unknown.
Cindy Hamilton
there you go, that's the meaning. Alton Brown taught me that many
years ago.
Janet US
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-26 18:57:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 11:15:59 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce
Who knows what it is? Americans use random European country names to
make something sound more interesting.
(transitive) To prepare (meat, fabric, etc.) by rolling or pounding in order to soften it.
Sadly, the etymology is unknown.
Cindy Hamilton
there you go, that's the meaning. Alton Brown taught me that many
years ago.
Janet US
Sure looks like okra, but those vegetables will become mush long
before that meat is braised to tender... should have added the veggies
way at the end.
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-26 21:32:44 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Sure looks like okra, but those vegetables will become mush long
before that meat is braised to tender... should have added the veggies
way at the end.
What ARE you talking about?? Okra hasn't been mentioned in this thread
until you commented and what veggies should anyone have added way
at the end??????????????
Hank Rogers
2021-11-27 00:54:38 UTC
Reply
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Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Sheldon Martin
Sure looks like okra, but those vegetables will become mush long
before that meat is braised to tender... should have added the veggies
way at the end.
What ARE you talking about?? Okra hasn't been mentioned in this thread
until you commented and what veggies should anyone have added way
at the end??????????????
He's in the catskills. They grow a lot of Okra in december. Popeye
himself supplies 90% of the world market's okra. Grown from 100%
belizean organic mayan seeds.

It's kosher jewish okra too, so everyone can eat it.
bruce bowser
2021-11-24 20:03:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir fry dishes. It works awesome.
Orange marmalade tenderizes beef just fine, but do the baking soda or corn starch tastes throw the taste of the beef off any?
dsi1
2021-11-24 20:30:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Post by dsi1
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir fry dishes. It works awesome.
Orange marmalade tenderizes beef just fine, but do the baking soda or corn starch tastes throw the taste of the beef off any?
I've never heard of orange marmalade on beef before. The baking soda or cornstarch doesn't affect the taste. Typically you add some garlic, soy sauce, sugar, egg whites, and other things to season the meat. That is basic Chinese stir fry technique.


bruce bowser
2021-11-24 22:56:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by bruce bowser
Post by dsi1
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir fry dishes. It works awesome.
Orange marmalade tenderizes beef just fine, but do the baking soda or corn starch tastes throw the taste of the beef off any?
I've never heard of orange marmalade on beef before.
And that is entirely understandable, of course. The relationship between fruit & veggies, dairy, and animal protein during the soaking process is very complex for us non-chemists. Wouldn't you agree? Or is something else the case?
Hank Rogers
2021-11-24 23:34:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Post by dsi1
Post by bruce bowser
Post by dsi1
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
The Chinese have been treating meat in this manner forever. I don't care for what baking soda does to the texture of meat and never do that. I have been using mechanically tenderized beef in Chinese stir fry dishes. It works awesome.
Orange marmalade tenderizes beef just fine, but do the baking soda or corn starch tastes throw the taste of the beef off any?
I've never heard of orange marmalade on beef before.
And that is entirely understandable, of course. The relationship between fruit & veggies, dairy, and animal protein during the soaking process is very complex for us non-chemists. Wouldn't you agree? Or is something else the case?
It's always different on rocks. There, all kinds of shit is used in
food preparation. And, they have special regulation for cannibal
dishes.

On mainlands, you have more flexibility, as long as you don't cook
any meat in it's mothers milk, lest yahweh gets pissed and smites
thy ass.
Sqwertz
2021-11-23 20:29:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
I got a shaker bottle of baking soda so I can just throw a light
dusting on sliced beef for my stir fries and chow funs. Toss it a
little bit with sesame oil, soy sauce, and oyster sauce (NO
SHAOHSING WINE - kills the soda), then another light dusting and
toss again. I probably use less than 1/4ts but have never tried it
with ground beef.

-sw
US Janet
2021-11-23 23:08:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sqwertz
Post by US Janet
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
I got a shaker bottle of baking soda so I can just throw a light
dusting on sliced beef for my stir fries and chow funs. Toss it a
little bit with sesame oil, soy sauce, and oyster sauce (NO
SHAOHSING WINE - kills the soda), then another light dusting and
toss again. I probably use less than 1/4ts but have never tried it
with ground beef.
-sw
good tip. thx
Janet US
Sqwertz
2021-11-24 06:56:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Post by Sqwertz
Post by US Janet
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
I got a shaker bottle of baking soda so I can just throw a light
dusting on sliced beef for my stir fries and chow funs. Toss it a
little bit with sesame oil, soy sauce, and oyster sauce (NO
SHAOHSING WINE - kills the soda), then another light dusting and
toss again. I probably use less than 1/4ts but have never tried it
with ground beef.
good tip. thx
Janet US
Without the shaker bottle, I can't see getting it evenly mixed into
ground beef without overworking and ruining it.

https://www.armandhammer.com/en/baking-soda/deodorizers/baking-soda-shaker/baking-soda-shaker-12-oz

The top pops off completely so you can re-fill it with the even
cheaper store-brand baking soda.

But measuring teaspoons from it is difficult without spilling
$.000005 worth of baking soda.

-sw
Gary
2021-11-24 13:10:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sqwertz
Post by US Janet
Post by Sqwertz
Post by US Janet
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
I got a shaker bottle of baking soda so I can just throw a light
dusting on sliced beef for my stir fries and chow funs. Toss it a
little bit with sesame oil, soy sauce, and oyster sauce (NO
SHAOHSING WINE - kills the soda), then another light dusting and
toss again. I probably use less than 1/4ts but have never tried it
with ground beef.
good tip. thx
Janet US
Without the shaker bottle, I can't see getting it evenly mixed into
ground beef without overworking and ruining it.
https://www.armandhammer.com/en/baking-soda/deodorizers/baking-soda-shaker/baking-soda-shaker-12-oz
The top pops off completely so you can re-fill it with the even
cheaper store-brand baking soda.
But measuring teaspoons from it is difficult without spilling
$.000005 worth of baking soda.
-sw
serious question here: Why the need to tenderize ground beef?
Gary
2021-11-24 15:07:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sqwertz
little bit with sesame oil, soy sauce, and oyster sauce
I do trust your sauce combinations but you gave no details about the ratio.

I will guess:
- 2-3 TBS soy sauce
- 1 TBS oyster sauce
- maybe 1 tsp or 1/2 of sesame oil

Am I close?
jmcquown
2021-11-23 21:38:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
Thanks for the post. I've heard of the baking soda trick but haven't
tried it.

Jill
US Janet
2021-11-23 23:09:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by US Janet
Just trying to keep you updated as to what is going on the the
cooking world.
https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how_tos/6707-tenderizing-meat-with-a-baking-soda-solution
Or
"When to add baking soda to ground beef?
Here’s the tip: For every pound of ground beef, a good rule of thumb
is to add about 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and to let the meat sit for
about 15 minutes before cooking. From there, you can throw the ground
beef in a hot, dry pan and cook it up."
Janet US
Thanks for the post. I've heard of the baking soda trick but haven't
tried it.
Jill
you're welcome
Janet US
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