Discussion:
REC: Salmon Patties
Add Reply
jmcquown
2021-12-30 00:51:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.

1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained

Saute in butter:
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic

Combine with the salmon:

1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt & pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise

Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.

Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.

*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.

Serves 6
Bruce
2021-12-30 01:38:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 29 Dec 2021 17:17:44 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by jmcquown
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.
1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic
1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt & pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise
Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.
Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.
*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.
Serves 6
What do you call housewives from circa 1970 who served crap
like that to their husbands?
Divorcees.
There's nothing wrong with it. I'd probably like it, unless I'm a
vegetarian.
Hank Rogers
2021-12-30 02:56:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Wed, 29 Dec 2021 17:17:44 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by jmcquown
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.
1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic
1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt & pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise
Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.
Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.
*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.
Serves 6
What do you call housewives from circa 1970 who served crap
like that to their husbands?
Divorcees.
There's nothing wrong with it. I'd probably like it, unless I'm a
vegetarian.
You don't eat dead salmon corpse master?
GM
2021-12-30 03:26:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Bruce
On Wed, 29 Dec 2021 17:17:44 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by jmcquown
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.
1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic
1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt & pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise
Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.
Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.
*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.
Serves 6
What do you call housewives from circa 1970 who served crap
like that to their husbands?
Divorcees.
There's nothing wrong with it. I'd probably like it, unless I'm a
vegetarian.
You don't eat dead salmon corpse master?
He's udderly reduced to pathetic "chum" sniffing and trolling, Hank...
--
GM
Bruce
2021-12-31 17:18:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Bruce
On Wed, 29 Dec 2021 17:17:44 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by jmcquown
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.
1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic
1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt & pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise
Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.
Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.
*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.
Serves 6
What do you call housewives from circa 1970 who served crap
like that to their husbands?
Divorcees.
There's nothing wrong with it. I'd probably like it, unless I'm a
vegetarian.
You don't eat dead salmon corpse master?
I don't think he's a troll. Hank Rogers, GM and the other froggers are
trolls. Nevertheless, people sometimes talk to them as if they're
normal, decent people. Why? Because they have an enemy in common.

RFC, for all your double standards
Michael Trew
2021-12-30 19:33:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.
1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic
1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt & pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise
Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.
Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.
*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.
Serves 6
Thanks! I have a can of pink salmon in the cabinet that I've been
meaning to use. Will have to make patties one of these days.

I've also seen red salmon in cans that the store, but it was
significantly more expensive. Is it a flavor difference?
Sheldon Martin
2021-12-30 21:19:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:33:12 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by jmcquown
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.
1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic
1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt & pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise
Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.
Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.
*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.
Serves 6
Thanks! I have a can of pink salmon in the cabinet that I've been
meaning to use. Will have to make patties one of these days.
I've also seen red salmon in cans that the store, but it was
significantly more expensive. Is it a flavor difference?
The red salmon does taste better (my taste) and is more neatly and
solidly packed into the can, there's less fatty skin and fewer bones.
Even the salmon stock tastes a lot better, don't drain it down the
sink, I drink it when no one is looking. It's well worth the price
difference... it's almost too good for patties... I like it cold from
the fridge with a squeeze of fresh lemon on a tossed salad. I
sometimes mix the stock with a bit of mayo and dillweed and use it to
dress the salad. I keep canned fish in the fridge so it's always
ready to dig in... they're small cans so don't take much space. One
of my favorites are those flat oval cans of sardines in tomato
sauce... used to be herring in tomato sauce, called tomato herring
... but these days herring is so scarce that they had to change the
name. My mother and father were very fond of all kinds of canned fish
so I got to eat it very often... kipper snacks was a favorite.
Naturally pickled fish was more popular in Brooklyn than hamburgers.
Matjes herring was my favorite. My father being Russian he was
addicted to pickled fish... went well with schnapps or vodka. My
mother liked pickled/smoked fish too but she was a tea drinker, even
had her special samovar.
https://www.thoughtco.com/russian-samovar-4771018
jmcquown
2021-12-30 22:20:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:33:12 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by jmcquown
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.
1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic
1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt & pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise
Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.
Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.
*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.
Serves 6
Thanks! I have a can of pink salmon in the cabinet that I've been
meaning to use. Will have to make patties one of these days.
I've also seen red salmon in cans that the store, but it was
significantly more expensive. Is it a flavor difference?
The red salmon does taste better (my taste) and is more neatly and
solidly packed into the can, there's less fatty skin and fewer bones.
Even the salmon stock tastes a lot better, don't drain it down the
sink, I drink it when no one is looking. It's well worth the price
difference... it's almost too good for patties...
I would not pay the higher price for canned red salmon if all I'm doing
with it is turning it into patties. By the time you add all the other
ingredients I'm hard pressed to taste any difference.

Jill


I like it cold from
Post by Sheldon Martin
the fridge with a squeeze of fresh lemon on a tossed salad. I
sometimes mix the stock with a bit of mayo and dillweed and use it to
dress the salad. I keep canned fish in the fridge so it's always
ready to dig in... they're small cans so don't take much space. One
of my favorites are those flat oval cans of sardines in tomato
sauce... used to be herring in tomato sauce, called tomato herring
... but these days herring is so scarce that they had to change the
name. My mother and father were very fond of all kinds of canned fish
so I got to eat it very often... kipper snacks was a favorite.
Naturally pickled fish was more popular in Brooklyn than hamburgers.
Matjes herring was my favorite. My father being Russian he was
addicted to pickled fish... went well with schnapps or vodka. My
mother liked pickled/smoked fish too but she was a tea drinker, even
had her special samovar.
https://www.thoughtco.com/russian-samovar-4771018
Michael Trew
2021-12-31 05:29:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:33:12 -0500, Michael Trew
Thanks! I have a can of pink salmon in the cabinet that I've been
meaning to use. Will have to make patties one of these days.
I've also seen red salmon in cans that the store, but it was
significantly more expensive. Is it a flavor difference?
The red salmon does taste better (my taste) and is more neatly and
solidly packed into the can, there's less fatty skin and fewer bones.
Even the salmon stock tastes a lot better, don't drain it down the
sink, I drink it when no one is looking. It's well worth the price
difference... it's almost too good for patties...
I would not pay the higher price for canned red salmon if all I'm doing
with it is turning it into patties. By the time you add all the other
ingredients I'm hard pressed to taste any difference.
Jill
Fair enough. I'll have to try the red salmon by it's self or in a salad
as Sheldon recommended some day.
Michael Trew
2021-12-31 05:28:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Thu, 30 Dec 2021 14:33:12 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by jmcquown
I adapted this from a Gullah cookbook but there's nothing particularly
Gullah about it.
1 can (15 oz) canned pink salmon, drained
1/2 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 small green bell pepper, finely chopped
1 clove minced garlic
1 large egg, beaten
3 Tbs. flour
salt& pepper
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1-2 Tbs. sour cream or prepared mayonnaise
Drain the liquid from the canned salmon and place in a large mixing
bowl. (If you're finicky like Gary, remove the small round bones or buy
boneless canned salmon.) Combine all the ingredients and mash well
togther with a fork. I rarely have sour cream on hand but find jarred
mayo to work just fine as a substitute. Form the salmon mixture into
patties and place on a platter lined with waxed paper (easy cleanup).
Place in the refrigerator to let set for at at least 10 minutes.
Cook the salmon patties in a large skillet in a bit of neutral oil (I
use corn oil) until the patties are browned and crisp on the outside,
hot and tender inside. Drain on paper towels and serve while hot.
*Note: In recent years I've found if you lightly dust the salmon patties
with a little cornstarch before letting them set it makes for a crispier
outside but does not alter the taste.
Serves 6
Thanks! I have a can of pink salmon in the cabinet that I've been
meaning to use. Will have to make patties one of these days.
I've also seen red salmon in cans that the store, but it was
significantly more expensive. Is it a flavor difference?
The red salmon does taste better (my taste) and is more neatly and
solidly packed into the can, there's less fatty skin and fewer bones.
Even the salmon stock tastes a lot better, don't drain it down the
sink, I drink it when no one is looking. It's well worth the price
difference... it's almost too good for patties... I like it cold from
the fridge with a squeeze of fresh lemon on a tossed salad. I
sometimes mix the stock with a bit of mayo and dillweed and use it to
dress the salad. I keep canned fish in the fridge so it's always
ready to dig in... they're small cans so don't take much space. One
of my favorites are those flat oval cans of sardines in tomato
sauce... used to be herring in tomato sauce, called tomato herring
.... but these days herring is so scarce that they had to change the
name. My mother and father were very fond of all kinds of canned fish
so I got to eat it very often... kipper snacks was a favorite.
Naturally pickled fish was more popular in Brookl