Discussion:
Using epoxy to repair beverage container
(too old to reply)
Pylls, Barry
2006-02-27 17:06:05 UTC
Permalink
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?

Thanks.
hob
2006-02-27 18:02:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
There are several basic catgories/types of adhesives, with varying
characteristics. No one adhesive is best for all applications.
There are about five or six adhesive types. Some are strong, some are
flexible, some hold better in heat, some are water resistant, some penetrate
deeply into the substrate.

All will dissolve and/or soften to varying degrees when immersed in hot
water, including the one that originally held the base onto the mug. Some
barely dissolve, others will wash off.
The problem I see with your application is that when immersed, water gets
into the rubber at the bond face and interferes with the bond, as well as
softening the bonding agent itself and allowing peel. And water stays in the
rubber for a long time after being taken out of the water.
So you should not immerse the glued parts in hot water if you want the
foot to stay put.

My guess is that the foot was originally attached with a glue similar to
Scotch 77 spray. You could clean the pad and base and use that spray on the
parts to reattach, and keep it out of the water and it would probably be ok,
or you could use a better adhesive, as below:

Epoxy has excellent tensile strength and is somewhat flexible relative to
some other types, but having used it a fair bit in engineering applications,
in my experience it is not the best for your application.

A favorite for problem attachments where flexibility, water, and
temperature is involved, and especially where rubber is involved (and even
where failures of other glues are happening) is "Shoo-Goo."
It is a flexible RTV type that sticks well, seals well, is fairly
forgiving of application, and takes some abuse. It does not have the tensile
strength of epoxy, but it has better toughness and is more pliable than
epoxy. And I think it has more "cleaning agents" in the mix than do other
RTV adhesives.

Matching characteristics and a clean dry substrate is the key to a good
bond. Throughly dry the base and the pad. Then clean the pad and the base
liberally with rubbing alcohol so the alcohol goes in and displaces the
water, and then it let dry in the open for a day or two (to get the moisture
out of the rubber.)
Wipe surfaces lightly with rubbing alcohol. Apply a film of Shoo-Goo to
the base and the rubber, being sure to get it out to the edges.
Then roll the rubber on, using one-edge-first like a pie crust top to
avoid air pockets, and press it on (not hard) all over with your thumb or a
roller to force out any air and get good contact. Wipe the edges to get a
neat filled edge. Let it cure 24 hours.

And avoid immersing the mug in hot water.

fwiw....
Post by Pylls, Barry
Thanks.
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-01 22:31:19 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for thoroughly outlining your experience with adhesives, hob.

Barry
Post by hob
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
There are several basic catgories/types of adhesives, with varying
characteristics. No one adhesive is best for all applications.
There are about five or six adhesive types. Some are strong, some are
flexible, some hold better in heat, some are water resistant, some penetrate
deeply into the substrate.
All will dissolve and/or soften to varying degrees when immersed in hot
water, including the one that originally held the base onto the mug. Some
barely dissolve, others will wash off.
The problem I see with your application is that when immersed, water gets
into the rubber at the bond face and interferes with the bond, as well as
softening the bonding agent itself and allowing peel. And water stays in the
rubber for a long time after being taken out of the water.
So you should not immerse the glued parts in hot water if you want the
foot to stay put.
My guess is that the foot was originally attached with a glue similar to
Scotch 77 spray. You could clean the pad and base and use that spray on the
parts to reattach, and keep it out of the water and it would probably be ok,
Epoxy has excellent tensile strength and is somewhat flexible relative to
some other types, but having used it a fair bit in engineering applications,
in my experience it is not the best for your application.
A favorite for problem attachments where flexibility, water, and
temperature is involved, and especially where rubber is involved (and even
where failures of other glues are happening) is "Shoo-Goo."
It is a flexible RTV type that sticks well, seals well, is fairly
forgiving of application, and takes some abuse. It does not have the tensile
strength of epoxy, but it has better toughness and is more pliable than
epoxy. And I think it has more "cleaning agents" in the mix than do other
RTV adhesives.
Matching characteristics and a clean dry substrate is the key to a good
bond. Throughly dry the base and the pad. Then clean the pad and the base
liberally with rubbing alcohol so the alcohol goes in and displaces the
water, and then it let dry in the open for a day or two (to get the moisture
out of the rubber.)
Wipe surfaces lightly with rubbing alcohol. Apply a film of Shoo-Goo to
the base and the rubber, being sure to get it out to the edges.
Then roll the rubber on, using one-edge-first like a pie crust top to
avoid air pockets, and press it on (not hard) all over with your thumb or a
roller to force out any air and get good contact. Wipe the edges to get a
neat filled edge. Let it cure 24 hours.
And avoid immersing the mug in hot water.
Zilbandy
2006-03-02 08:31:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by hob
There are several basic catgories/types of adhesives, with varying
characteristics.
Go to a pet shop and get some silicone rubber aquarium cement. It's
non toxic to fish so I would assume it would be safe to humans, but
you might want to get an expert opinion on that one first.
--
Zilbandy - Tucson, Arizona USA <***@zilbandyREMOVETHIS.com>
Dead Suburban's Home Page: http://zilbandy.com/suburb/
PGP Public Key: http://zilbandy.com/pgpkey.htm
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-02 19:59:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zilbandy
Post by hob
There are several basic catgories/types of adhesives, with varying
characteristics.
Go to a pet shop and get some silicone rubber aquarium cement. It's
non toxic to fish so I would assume it would be safe to humans, but
you might want to get an expert opinion on that one first.
Thanks, Zilbandy.

The info I've found on the web is that silicone is safer than
epoxy, in general, though some epoxy is food-grade. Even with
silicone, however, it a good idea to look for explicit designation
as food-safe, since such a distinction exists.

For my application, it's probably not so important, but for more
intimate contact with food, probabably worthwhile.
p***@hotmail.com
2006-02-27 18:09:39 UTC
Permalink
Hello Barry:

I use epoxy by the gallon (literally; I build and fly very large model
rockets). 30 min epoxy will probably work better that 5 min, but the 5
min may work well enough if it's mixed thoroughly and the surfaces are
scuffed well with sandpaper.

After mixing the epoxy for about two minutes, quickly apply a thin
layer to each surface, and squish 'em together. Stack a few books atop
the mug til the epoxy sets. After the epoxy sets, warm the mug to
accelerate the cure (maybe leave it in a sink of hot water).

If the two parts are measured (reasonably) carefully and mixed
thoroughly, there should be very little if anything that can leach into
dishwater.

Best -- Terry
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-01 23:33:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@hotmail.com
I use epoxy by the gallon (literally; I build and fly very large model
rockets). 30 min epoxy will probably work better that 5 min, but the 5
min may work well enough if it's mixed thoroughly and the surfaces are
scuffed well with sandpaper.
After mixing the epoxy for about two minutes, quickly apply a thin
layer to each surface, and squish 'em together. Stack a few books atop
the mug til the epoxy sets. After the epoxy sets, warm the mug to
accelerate the cure (maybe leave it in a sink of hot water).
If the two parts are measured (reasonably) carefully and mixed
thoroughly, there should be very little if anything that can leach into
dishwater.
Thanks, Terry. I suppose that makes sense. The 2 chemicals
are obviously complementary in some fashion, and stabilize
each other.
Sheldon
2006-02-27 18:17:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
I've become a big fan of Gorilla Glue/Gorilla Tape.

Just yesterday I used Gorilla Glue to repair the arm on my PC chair.
One of the screws kept backing out and falling on the floor. Finally I
got fed up and put a small dab of Gorilla Glue on the threads and
screwed it back in, bet it stays there until I decide to remove it,
probably never. I've used Gorilla Glue to repair all sorts of stuff
where no other glue/epoxy I tried worked. A very little goes a long
way, typically a teeny daub from a toothpic is all that's needed.
Unless you do a lot of gluing buy just a small quantity, Gorilla Glue
does have a shelf life of about two years.

http://gorillaglue.com

Sheldon
OmManiPadmeOmelet
2006-02-27 19:04:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheldon
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
I've become a big fan of Gorilla Glue/Gorilla Tape.
Just yesterday I used Gorilla Glue to repair the arm on my PC chair.
One of the screws kept backing out and falling on the floor. Finally I
got fed up and put a small dab of Gorilla Glue on the threads and
screwed it back in, bet it stays there until I decide to remove it,
probably never. I've used Gorilla Glue to repair all sorts of stuff
where no other glue/epoxy I tried worked. A very little goes a long
way, typically a teeny daub from a toothpic is all that's needed.
Unless you do a lot of gluing buy just a small quantity, Gorilla Glue
does have a shelf life of about two years.
http://gorillaglue.com
Sheldon
Just don't leave gorilla glue where your pets can get at it.
One woman on one of the dog lists left some out and her dog got into it
and ate some.

The dog was dead less than 48 hours later.

Don't know why a dog would eat gorilla glue, but if it's the least bit
attractive to pets, one needs to be careful.
--
Peace, Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
Sheldon
2006-02-27 19:57:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by OmManiPadmeOmelet
Post by Sheldon
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
I've become a big fan of Gorilla Glue/Gorilla Tape.
Just yesterday I used Gorilla Glue to repair the arm on my PC chair.
One of the screws kept backing out and falling on the floor. Finally I
got fed up and put a small dab of Gorilla Glue on the threads and
screwed it back in, bet it stays there until I decide to remove it,
probably never. I've used Gorilla Glue to repair all sorts of stuff
where no other glue/epoxy I tried worked. A very little goes a long
way, typically a teeny daub from a toothpic is all that's needed.
Unless you do a lot of gluing buy just a small quantity, Gorilla Glue
does have a shelf life of about two years.
http://gorillaglue.com
Sheldon
Just don't leave gorilla glue where your pets can get at it.
One woman on one of the dog lists left some out and her dog got into it
and ate some.
The dog was dead less than 48 hours later.
Don't know why a dog would eat gorilla glue, but if it's the least bit
attractive to pets, one needs to be careful.
Probably no more a danger than epoxy, and many, many other household
products. Why would it be left out or do you mean after it's cured?

Anyway my house is much better than dog pruf, it's cat pruf... nothing
a cat can get into touble with is out in the open... all attractive
nuisances are in tamper pruf lock-up. Everyone knows cats are capable
of getting into things dogs can't even dream about.

Sheldon
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-01 23:38:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheldon
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
I've become a big fan of Gorilla Glue/Gorilla Tape.
Just yesterday I used Gorilla Glue to repair the arm on my PC chair.
One of the screws kept backing out and falling on the floor. Finally I
got fed up and put a small dab of Gorilla Glue on the threads and
screwed it back in, bet it stays there until I decide to remove it,
probably never. I've used Gorilla Glue to repair all sorts of stuff
where no other glue/epoxy I tried worked. A very little goes a long
way, typically a teeny daub from a toothpic is all that's needed.
Unless you do a lot of gluing buy just a small quantity, Gorilla Glue
does have a shelf life of about two years.
http://gorillaglue.com
It says it's waterproof, nontoxic, and pH neutral. While I am not
a chemist, that certainly sounds encouraging. Thanks for the pointer.
OmManiPadmeOmelet
2006-02-27 18:39:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Thanks.
Epoxy is fine.
It's all I ever use to repair plates, cups, etc.
Jewelry too. :-)
--
Peace, Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
Sheldon
2006-02-28 02:32:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by OmManiPadmeOmelet
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Epoxy is fine.
It's all I ever use to repair plates.
Wow! You do your own dentistry. hehe

Reminds me of a fellow I worked with... Mungo we called him, he was
king of the dumpster divers. One day he asked to borrow my Channel
Locs... five minutes later he came back to return them, opened his fist
and with a big shit eating grin showed me a bloodly molar... that son
of a bitch pulled his own tooth! Albert Campbell is his real name...
anyone ever goes to Nova Scotia and bumps into him tell him hello from
me, I helped him find a few acres there and that's where he went for
retirement. Mungo was a nice guy, very good natured, but they don't
come any weirder or tighter with a dollar.

Sheldon
OmManiPadmeOmelet
2006-02-28 03:18:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheldon
Post by OmManiPadmeOmelet
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Epoxy is fine.
It's all I ever use to repair plates.
Wow! You do your own dentistry. hehe
I wish. ;-)
Post by Sheldon
Reminds me of a fellow I worked with... Mungo we called him, he was
king of the dumpster divers. One day he asked to borrow my Channel
Locs... five minutes later he came back to return them, opened his fist
and with a big shit eating grin showed me a bloodly molar... that son
of a bitch pulled his own tooth! Albert Campbell is his real name...
anyone ever goes to Nova Scotia and bumps into him tell him hello from
me, I helped him find a few acres there and that's where he went for
retirement. Mungo was a nice guy, very good natured, but they don't
come any weirder or tighter with a dollar.
Sheldon
Andre' the giant?

He's dead...
--
Peace, Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-01 23:48:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by OmManiPadmeOmelet
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Thanks.
Epoxy is fine.
It's all I ever use to repair plates, cups, etc.
Jewelry too. :-)
Plates? Interesting. Probably not on the portion that comes in contact
with food, I suppose?
ms_peacock
2006-02-27 20:00:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Thanks.
I don't see a problem unless you're going to be drinking the dishwater. I
would wash it by hand and not in the dishwasher after the repair.

Ms P
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-01 23:55:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by ms_peacock
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
I don't see a problem unless you're going to be drinking the dishwater. I
would wash it by hand and not in the dishwasher after the repair.
You're right, it's not exactly in *intimate* contact with food or beverage.
Sometimes, however, I keep water running into a pot in which I rinse soapy
dishes. If the soap water has chemicals leached into it from the glue, there
may be still some residue after a quick plunge into the pot (I don't empty
out the pot of water between items rinsed, I just keep water running into
it). If there anything in the soap water, it's probably in trace quantities,
but I thought I'd just find a suitable material for the job so that it's not
even a consideration. Not a huge concern, just due diligence.
Bob (this one)
2006-02-28 01:53:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
I suspect that the reason the bottom is coming off is because it's been
immersed in hot water. There's a family of seriously good adhesives
called "Goop." They come in different varieties for different
applications. Try one of the big home store chains.

I'd wash it with a sponge or rag and hot water inside. Wipe the outside
and let it air dry. No immersion.

Pastorio
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-01 23:57:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
I suspect that the reason the bottom is coming off is because it's been
immersed in hot water. There's a family of seriously good adhesives
called "Goop." They come in different varieties for different
applications. Try one of the big home store chains.
I'd wash it with a sponge or rag and hot water inside. Wipe the outside
and let it air dry. No immersion.
Yes, someone mentioned Shoo Goo. I'm not sure about its food safety, but
it is a thought.

It's hard not to get the bottom wet when washing the cup. I'll
just find something that can withstand the water....
zxcvbob
2006-02-28 03:38:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Thanks.
Five-minute epoxy is not a good choice. Slow-set epoxy is much more
durable and moisture resistant.

Bob
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-01 23:59:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by zxcvbob
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Thanks.
Five-minute epoxy is not a good choice. Slow-set epoxy is much more
durable and moisture resistant.
OK, thanks for that tidbit. I'm not really in a hurry to use the cup,
so slow epoxy is a good choice. It will probably be the last time I
ever use slow epoxy though. I don't think I've ever used it since
fast epoxy was developed. Ah well, it's worth it.
Peter Huebner
2006-03-01 06:38:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Thanks.
If you want to put it into the dishwasher epoxy of any description is a nono
because epoxy is a thermoplastic. Most epoxy glues start to liquify around 60
degrees Celsius (I said start, I didn't say they go runny) and let go.

Sheldon's Gorilla glue is a much better bet. Gorilla glue comes in two
flavours, the red stuff in handy man tiny bottles, which is not exactly awe
inspiring and the clear stuff that we here in NZ only get in cartridges, and
that stuff is truly excellent. I've done a lot of mission critical joinery with
it. Polyurethane, once it's set it's set. Pour boiling water over it - so what.
:-)

-P.
--
=========================================
firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
zxcvbob
2006-03-01 13:54:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Huebner
Post by Pylls, Barry
I have an all-metal travel mug (the ones with vaccum between inner and
outer walls) whose rubber bottom is peeling off. I was going to use
5-minute epoxy to paste it back on. I'm somewhat certain that it is
inert, but just wondering if anyone knows of any issues e.g.
substances leaching into surround water when it is being washed in hot
dishwater. The reason for this caution is that I know that some
house-hold pails are not recommended for use in creating large
quantities of food for that reason (leaching). I epoxy is not a good
adhesive, what is?
Thanks.
If you want to put it into the dishwasher epoxy of any description is a nono
because epoxy is a thermoplastic. Most epoxy glues start to liquify around 60
degrees Celsius (I said start, I didn't say they go runny) and let go.
Sheldon's Gorilla glue is a much better bet. Gorilla glue comes in two
flavours, the red stuff in handy man tiny bottles, which is not exactly awe
inspiring and the clear stuff that we here in NZ only get in cartridges, and
that stuff is truly excellent. I've done a lot of mission critical joinery with
it. Polyurethane, once it's set it's set. Pour boiling water over it - so what.
:-)
-P.
Epoxy is a thermosetting plastic, not a thermoplastic. It doesn't soften.

Gorilla Glue(tm) expands when it dries. That might not be good here.

I'd probably use Duro (I think that's the brand) "Black Plastic Rubber"
if I could find it. I've used it to fix stuff like tennis shoe soles
that were coming loose.

Bob
Sheldon
2006-03-01 16:35:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by zxcvbob
Gorilla Glue(tm) expands when it dries. That might not be good here.
The expansion factor during curing is a great thing, fills all the
voids. With Gorilla Glue one must get used to the fact that less is
more, is all. When joints are properly clamped, as they should be
with all glues, there will be no excessive gapping. And any glue that
does squeeze out is easily trimmed/sanded. Doesn't take more than 2-3
uses to realize how skimpily to apply Gorilla Glue. To date nothing
I've used it to glue has come apart. Gorilla Glue is great stuff... no
measuring/mixing either. The very first thing I repaired with Gorilla
Glue were my eyeglasses, one teensy dab paid for my little bottle of
Gorilla Glue 40 times over... and this was three years ago, glasses are
still fine, in fact I'm wearing them now, I wear them 24/7, even sleep
in them. Since I got my Gorilla Glue I've used no other, my pint of
Elsie white stuff is all but abandoned.
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-02 01:43:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheldon
Post by zxcvbob
Gorilla Glue(tm) expands when it dries. That might not be good here.
The expansion factor during curing is a great thing, fills all the
voids. With Gorilla Glue one must get used to the fact that less is
more, is all. When joints are properly clamped, as they should be
with all glues, there will be no excessive gapping. And any glue that
does squeeze out is easily trimmed/sanded. Doesn't take more than 2-3
uses to realize how skimpily to apply Gorilla Glue. To date nothing
I've used it to glue has come apart. Gorilla Glue is great stuff... no
measuring/mixing either. The very first thing I repaired with Gorilla
Glue were my eyeglasses, one teensy dab paid for my little bottle of
Gorilla Glue 40 times over... and this was three years ago, glasses are
still fine, in fact I'm wearing them now, I wear them 24/7, even sleep
in them. Since I got my Gorilla Glue I've used no other, my pint of
Elsie white stuff is all but abandoned.
Regarding Gorilla Glue, I've found that qualifying adhesives for food
contact is important (maybe not so much for my situation, since it's
only at the bottom of the cup, but for more intimate "exposure").

Food-grade epoxy, not standard hardware store epoxy or boat-builder
epoxy (won't stand up to heat). It's just normal epoxy that's gone
through some FDA tests. I think Copper-Bond is something like this.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/c280e7c998802731
http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.polymers/msg/29896a44606fa757

Untested epoxies might have harmful leached agents:
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.boats.cruising/browse_frm/thread/d0910a394eb2f411

Silicone ("RTV") withstands high temperature and is food-safe.
http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:JGrucsznKfIJ:www.gsweb.com.tw/~nono/gsweb/trade_files/en_list/en_4_004.htm
http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/112.html

Apparently, even silicone comes in gradings, one being food-grade.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.crafts.brewing/browse_frm/thread/72c11110658b608e

Mention is also made of food-safe polyurethane, but I'm not sure
if it is in the context of adhesives.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/e402aed40aa01134

OK, enough googling. Time to visit the hardware store to check out
food-grade epoxies or silicone. Thanks, all!

P.S. I found that the cup doesn't actually vacuum between exterior &
interior walls. It is filled with a foamy substance. The holes for
injecting this are big gaping holes at the bottom of the cup, covered
by the rubber bottom (no longer). So water has entered the interior,
and will probably be there to stay, considering the foamy insulation
and all. Oh well. Not the end of the world, but it just goes to show
that vacuum insulated cups are probably not to be gotten except in
specialty cups that explicitly advertise this -- not cups that look
like what use to be vacuum cups in the past. That is, stainless
steel construction, which these days are no guarantee of vacuum-ness.
t***@yahoo.com
2006-03-02 14:13:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
Post by Sheldon
Post by zxcvbob
Gorilla Glue(tm) expands when it dries. That might not be good here.
The expansion factor during curing is a great thing, fills all the
voids. With Gorilla Glue one must get used to the fact that less is
more, is all. When joints are properly clamped, as they should be
with all glues, there will be no excessive gapping. And any glue that
does squeeze out is easily trimmed/sanded. Doesn't take more than 2-3
uses to realize how skimpily to apply Gorilla Glue. To date nothing
I've used it to glue has come apart. Gorilla Glue is great stuff... no
measuring/mixing either. The very first thing I repaired with Gorilla
Glue were my eyeglasses, one teensy dab paid for my little bottle of
Gorilla Glue 40 times over... and this was three years ago, glasses are
still fine, in fact I'm wearing them now, I wear them 24/7, even sleep
in them. Since I got my Gorilla Glue I've used no other, my pint of
Elsie white stuff is all but abandoned.
Regarding Gorilla Glue, I've found that qualifying adhesives for food
contact is important (maybe not so much for my situation, since it's
only at the bottom of the cup, but for more intimate "exposure").
Food-grade epoxy, not standard hardware store epoxy or boat-builder
epoxy (won't stand up to heat). It's just normal epoxy that's gone
through some FDA tests. I think Copper-Bond is something like this.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/c280e7c998802731
http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.polymers/msg/29896a44606fa757
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.boats.cruising/browse_frm/thread/d0910a394eb2f411
Silicone ("RTV") withstands high temperature and is food-safe.
http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:JGrucsznKfIJ:www.gsweb.com.tw/~nono/gsweb/trade_files/en_list/en_4_004.htm
http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/112.html
Apparently, even silicone comes in gradings, one being food-grade.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.crafts.brewing/browse_frm/thread/72c11110658b608e
Mention is also made of food-safe polyurethane, but I'm not sure
if it is in the context of adhesives.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/e402aed40aa01134
OK, enough googling. Time to visit the hardware store to check out
food-grade epoxies or silicone. Thanks, all!
P.S. I found that the cup doesn't actually vacuum between exterior &
interior walls. It is filled with a foamy substance. The holes for
injecting this are big gaping holes at the bottom of the cup, covered
by the rubber bottom (no longer). So water has entered the interior,
and will probably be there to stay, considering the foamy insulation
and all. Oh well. Not the end of the world, but it just goes to show
that vacuum insulated cups are probably not to be gotten except in
specialty cups that explicitly advertise this -- not cups that look
like what use to be vacuum cups in the past. That is, stainless
steel construction, which these days are no guarantee of vacuum-ness.
have you tried calling the manufacturer?
if you're doing all this research, might as well go to the source.
maybe they will be interested and repair your product for free.
[i've seen local hardware stores sell food-grade products.]
Sheldon
2006-03-02 14:52:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@yahoo.com
Post by Pylls, Barry
Post by Sheldon
Post by zxcvbob
Gorilla Glue(tm) expands when it dries. That might not be good here.
The expansion factor during curing is a great thing, fills all the
voids. With Gorilla Glue one must get used to the fact that less is
more, is all. When joints are properly clamped, as they should be
with all glues, there will be no excessive gapping. And any glue that
does squeeze out is easily trimmed/sanded. Doesn't take more than 2-3
uses to realize how skimpily to apply Gorilla Glue. To date nothing
I've used it to glue has come apart. Gorilla Glue is great stuff... no
measuring/mixing either. The very first thing I repaired with Gorilla
Glue were my eyeglasses, one teensy dab paid for my little bottle of
Gorilla Glue 40 times over... and this was three years ago, glasses are
still fine, in fact I'm wearing them now, I wear them 24/7, even sleep
in them. Since I got my Gorilla Glue I've used no other, my pint of
Elsie white stuff is all but abandoned.
Regarding Gorilla Glue, I've found that qualifying adhesives for food
contact is important (maybe not so much for my situation, since it's
only at the bottom of the cup, but for more intimate "exposure").
Food-grade epoxy, not standard hardware store epoxy or boat-builder
epoxy (won't stand up to heat). It's just normal epoxy that's gone
through some FDA tests. I think Copper-Bond is something like this.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/c280e7c998802731
http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.polymers/msg/29896a44606fa757
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.boats.cruising/browse_frm/thread/d0910a394eb2f411
Silicone ("RTV") withstands high temperature and is food-safe.
http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:JGrucsznKfIJ:www.gsweb.com.tw/~nono/gsweb/trade_files/en_list/en_4_004.htm
http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/112.html
Apparently, even silicone comes in gradings, one being food-grade.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.crafts.brewing/browse_frm/thread/72c11110658b608e
Mention is also made of food-safe polyurethane, but I'm not sure
if it is in the context of adhesives.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/e402aed40aa01134
OK, enough googling. Time to visit the hardware store to check out
food-grade epoxies or silicone. Thanks, all!
P.S. I found that the cup doesn't actually vacuum between exterior &
interior walls. It is filled with a foamy substance. The holes for
injecting this are big gaping holes at the bottom of the cup, covered
by the rubber bottom (no longer). So water has entered the interior,
and will probably be there to stay, considering the foamy insulation
and all. Oh well. Not the end of the world, but it just goes to show
that vacuum insulated cups are probably not to be gotten except in
specialty cups that explicitly advertise this -- not cups that look
like what use to be vacuum cups in the past. That is, stainless
steel construction, which these days are no guarantee of vacuum-ness.
have you tried calling the manufacturer?
if you're doing all this research, might as well go to the source.
maybe they will be interested and repair your product for free.
[i've seen local hardware stores sell food-grade products.]
Just realized I have a collection of those SS "Thermocafe" bottles, by
Thermos, in various confiurations. Mine all have company logos silk
screened on them, were freebie promotional items. Why not simply buy a
new one... THEY'RE CHEAP... look here:

http://www.discountmugs.com/insulated-travel-mugs.htm

http://www.walgreens.com/store/productlist.jsp?CATID=303651&selectedBrand=106

Sheldon
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-02 20:29:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheldon
Post by t***@yahoo.com
Post by Pylls, Barry
Post by Sheldon
Post by zxcvbob
Gorilla Glue(tm) expands when it dries. That might not be good here.
The expansion factor during curing is a great thing, fills all the
voids. With Gorilla Glue one must get used to the fact that less is
more, is all. When joints are properly clamped, as they should be
with all glues, there will be no excessive gapping. And any glue that
does squeeze out is easily trimmed/sanded. Doesn't take more than 2-3
uses to realize how skimpily to apply Gorilla Glue. To date nothing
I've used it to glue has come apart. Gorilla Glue is great stuff... no
measuring/mixing either. The very first thing I repaired with Gorilla
Glue were my eyeglasses, one teensy dab paid for my little bottle of
Gorilla Glue 40 times over... and this was three years ago, glasses are
still fine, in fact I'm wearing them now, I wear them 24/7, even sleep
in them. Since I got my Gorilla Glue I've used no other, my pint of
Elsie white stuff is all but abandoned.
Regarding Gorilla Glue, I've found that qualifying adhesives for food
contact is important (maybe not so much for my situation, since it's
only at the bottom of the cup, but for more intimate "exposure").
Food-grade epoxy, not standard hardware store epoxy or boat-builder
epoxy (won't stand up to heat). It's just normal epoxy that's gone
through some FDA tests. I think Copper-Bond is something like this.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/c280e7c998802731
http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.polymers/msg/29896a44606fa757
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.boats.cruising/browse_frm/thread/d0910a394eb2f411
Silicone ("RTV") withstands high temperature and is food-safe.
http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:JGrucsznKfIJ:www.gsweb.com.tw/~nono/gsweb/trade_files/en_list/en_4_004.htm
http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/112.html
Apparently, even silicone comes in gradings, one being food-grade.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.crafts.brewing/browse_frm/thread/72c11110658b608e
Mention is also made of food-safe polyurethane, but I'm not sure
if it is in the context of adhesives.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/e402aed40aa01134
OK, enough googling. Time to visit the hardware store to check out
food-grade epoxies or silicone. Thanks, all!
P.S. I found that the cup doesn't actually vacuum between exterior &
interior walls. It is filled with a foamy substance. The holes for
injecting this are big gaping holes at the bottom of the cup, covered
by the rubber bottom (no longer). So water has entered the interior,
and will probably be there to stay, considering the foamy insulation
and all. Oh well. Not the end of the world, but it just goes to show
that vacuum insulated cups are probably not to be gotten except in
specialty cups that explicitly advertise this -- not cups that look
like what use to be vacuum cups in the past. That is, stainless
steel construction, which these days are no guarantee of vacuum-ness.
have you tried calling the manufacturer?
if you're doing all this research, might as well go to the source.
maybe they will be interested and repair your product for free.
[i've seen local hardware stores sell food-grade products.]
Just realized I have a collection of those SS "Thermocafe" bottles, by
Thermos, in various confiurations. Mine all have company logos silk
screened on them, were freebie promotional items. Why not simply buy a
http://www.discountmugs.com/insulated-travel-mugs.htm
http://www.walgreens.com/store/productlist.jsp?CATID=303651&selectedBrand=106
Warning: Evangelism follows.

True enough. Even if it were free, though, I'm not much of a fan of
discarding something if it can be fixed. The research was for info that
I consider important in general, not necessarily for this particular
situation.

About cups, this one took a very long time to find. No weird plastic
outer shells so that you can slide pictures around the cup (I mean, I
want to drink coffee, not watch a movie). The body actually fits my
car cup holder. The lid pushes in, doesn't screw in (good), so you
can position the opening anywhere along the rim, and change that
position whenever you want (no pooring of hot water on the handle to
reposition it). The lid doesn't fit loosy-goosy (thus popping out
when least desired, and spilling scalding beverage on your bodily
parts), the rim is nice and thin-walled rather than half a centimeter
wide so that you can actually sip fluid into your mouth, it has a
slidable cover on the lid that doesn't go loosy-goosy in a week (thus
constantly falling back into a close position), the cover is not some
new-fangled mechano-gizmo thing, so it's not a exercise in contortions
to clean. The sad thing is that the original cups were excellent, did
the job in a fine way, and most of the newer variations are poorly
thought out, poorly designed, and poorly constructed. We need to get
back to the basics. A simple cup, but well made. NOTHING CUTE OR
FANCY.

The one I have is not one of the more costly ones, but the costly ones
tended to be not so good. The scent of the hot plastic lid would
overwhelm the coffee even after weeks of use, or somehow water would
get between the inner & outer wall quite early on so that you could
hear it sloshing around. If water is getting in, it's also going to
get out. Depending on where the breach is, you could be drinking
stale dishwater with your coffee e.g. if there were small cracks along
the seam around the rim. Yum. And water isn't the greatest
insulation material be go between the inner and outer walls. Needless
to say, the vacuum in there was long gone.

The presence of foam-ish insulation rather than vacuum is not
necessarily a bad thing, aside from the fact that water has gotten in.
It's a feature I can live without. The idea is that vacuum doesn't
offer any way for heat to conduct from inner to outer walls, except by
way of the rim -- the long way round, which makes it hard for heat to
escape. However, the hot inner wall is emitting infrared (IR), which
is shining onto the outer wall. So the energy (heat) is in fact
escaping. If you fill the space up with insulation, the IR shines on
the insulation and gets turned into heat immediately at the interface
between inner wall and insulation. Assuming that it doesn't conduct
toward the outer wall very well, it simply passes the heat back to the
inner wall. Basically, it blocks the IR and prevents heat from
escaping from the inner wall.

Since my current cup was settled on after a lengthy search, I'm not
too keen on embarking on another search and series of trials --
especially over the web, where you can't see, and touch the product to
see how well it might be designed.

Despite my rant, however, I do appreciate the time you've taken to
look for the alternative you've suggested. And I hope I haven't
discouraged you from responding to my postings in the future!
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-02 20:01:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@yahoo.com
Post by Pylls, Barry
Post by Sheldon
Post by zxcvbob
Gorilla Glue(tm) expands when it dries. That might not be good here.
The expansion factor during curing is a great thing, fills all the
voids. With Gorilla Glue one must get used to the fact that less is
more, is all. When joints are properly clamped, as they should be
with all glues, there will be no excessive gapping. And any glue that
does squeeze out is easily trimmed/sanded. Doesn't take more than 2-3
uses to realize how skimpily to apply Gorilla Glue. To date nothing
I've used it to glue has come apart. Gorilla Glue is great stuff... no
measuring/mixing either. The very first thing I repaired with Gorilla
Glue were my eyeglasses, one teensy dab paid for my little bottle of
Gorilla Glue 40 times over... and this was three years ago, glasses are
still fine, in fact I'm wearing them now, I wear them 24/7, even sleep
in them. Since I got my Gorilla Glue I've used no other, my pint of
Elsie white stuff is all but abandoned.
Regarding Gorilla Glue, I've found that qualifying adhesives for food
contact is important (maybe not so much for my situation, since it's
only at the bottom of the cup, but for more intimate "exposure").
Food-grade epoxy, not standard hardware store epoxy or boat-builder
epoxy (won't stand up to heat). It's just normal epoxy that's gone
through some FDA tests. I think Copper-Bond is something like this.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/c280e7c998802731
http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.polymers/msg/29896a44606fa757
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.boats.cruising/browse_frm/thread/d0910a394eb2f411
Silicone ("RTV") withstands high temperature and is food-safe.
http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:JGrucsznKfIJ:www.gsweb.com.tw/~nono/gsweb/trade_files/en_list/en_4_004.htm
http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/112.html
Apparently, even silicone comes in gradings, one being food-grade.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.crafts.brewing/browse_frm/thread/72c11110658b608e
Mention is also made of food-safe polyurethane, but I'm not sure
if it is in the context of adhesives.
http://groups.google.ca/group/rec.org.sca/browse_frm/thread/e402aed40aa01134
OK, enough googling. Time to visit the hardware store to check out
food-grade epoxies or silicone. Thanks, all!
P.S. I found that the cup doesn't actually vacuum between exterior &
interior walls. It is filled with a foamy substance. The holes for
injecting this are big gaping holes at the bottom of the cup, covered
by the rubber bottom (no longer). So water has entered the interior,
and will probably be there to stay, considering the foamy insulation
and all. Oh well. Not the end of the world, but it just goes to show
that vacuum insulated cups are probably not to be gotten except in
specialty cups that explicitly advertise this -- not cups that look
like what use to be vacuum cups in the past. That is, stainless
steel construction, which these days are no guarantee of vacuum-ness.
have you tried calling the manufacturer?
if you're doing all this research, might as well go to the source.
maybe they will be interested and repair your product for free.
[i've seen local hardware stores sell food-grade products.]
It's a small item, so it's not worth the hassle of bugging them, shipping
it, and waiting for a replacement. Which will probably fail in a few months
in the same way. Better just find a way to fix it good.

The research was more for my own knowledge in future cases where food-safe
adhesives matter more, and in case anyone else is googling for food-safe
adhesives.
t***@yahoo.com
2006-03-03 01:24:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pylls, Barry
Post by t***@yahoo.com
have you tried calling the manufacturer?
if you're doing all this research, might as well go to the source.
maybe they will be interested and repair your product for free.
[i've seen local hardware stores sell food-grade products.]
It's a small item, so it's not worth the hassle of bugging them, shipping
it, and waiting for a replacement. Which will probably fail in a few months
in the same way. Better just find a way to fix it good.
The research was more for my own knowledge in future cases where food-safe
adhesives matter more, and in case anyone else is googling for food-safe
adhesives.
sure it's worth it. sometimes you luck out and can get a technician who
actually knows something and is delighted to talk at an advanced level.
you don't have to send it back but you do want to know what material
it's made out of and what they use or might recommend for a repair,
given your requirements of wanting to wash it in warm water.

about food safe. that's funny. recently i went into that as you did
considering what you use to lubricate the housing for water filters.
technically there exists food grade silicone. but it's expensive and
difficult to locate. sometimes it can be found in plumbing supplies. i
found my old notes, apparently anything from petroleum jelly on up or
down would work, just about anything. now Vaseline is not exactly food
safe but it's not going to come much in contact with the water if done
right. and the particular O-ring is made out of a material that is
impervious to vaseline. rubber, on the other hand, would definitely
deteriorate with vaseline. so it helps to know. i was surprised about
the O-ring. in the end, i did buy the special stuff but never even used
since the O-ring looks brand new still. maybe next year.
Pylls, Barry
2006-03-05 15:06:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@yahoo.com
Post by Pylls, Barry
Post by t***@yahoo.com
have you tried calling the manufacturer?
if you're doing all this research, might as well go to the source.
maybe they will be interested and repair your product for free.
[i've seen local hardware stores sell food-grade products.]
It's a small item, so it's not worth the hassle of bugging them, shipping
it, and waiting for a replacement. Which will probably fail in a few months
in the same way. Better just find a way to fix it good.
The research was more for my own knowledge in future cases where food-safe
adhesives matter more, and in case anyone else is googling for food-safe
adhesives.
sure it's worth it. sometimes you luck out and can get a technician who
actually knows something and is delighted to talk at an advanced level.
you don't have to send it back but you do want to know what material
it's made out of and what they use or might recommend for a repair,
given your requirements of wanting to wash it in warm water.
about food safe. that's funny. recently i went into that as you did
considering what you use to lubricate the housing for water filters.
technically there exists food grade silicone. but it's expensive and
difficult to locate. sometimes it can be found in plumbing supplies. i
found my old notes, apparently anything from petroleum jelly on up or
down would work, just about anything. now Vaseline is not exactly food
safe but it's not going to come much in contact with the water if done
right. and the particular O-ring is made out of a material that is
impervious to vaseline. rubber, on the other hand, would definitely
deteriorate with vaseline. so it helps to know. i was surprised about
the O-ring. in the end, i did buy the special stuff but never even used
since the O-ring looks brand new still. maybe next year.
The cup has no insignia, so it's hard to contact the company.
I ended up getting epoxy for plumbing for pottable water, based on a
suggestion here. Thanks!

t***@yahoo.com
2006-03-02 16:44:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheldon
The expansion factor during curing is a great thing, fills all the
voids. With Gorilla Glue one must get used to the fact that less is
more, is all. When joints are properly clamped, as they should be
with all glues, there will be no excessive gapping. And any glue that
does squeeze out is easily trimmed/sanded. Doesn't take more than 2-3
uses to realize how skimpily to apply Gorilla Glue. To date nothing
I've used it to glue has come apart. Gorilla Glue is great stuff... no
measuring/mixing either. The very first thing I repaired with Gorilla
Glue were my eyeglasses, one teensy dab paid for my little bottle of
Gorilla Glue 40 times over... and this was three years ago, glasses are
still fine, in fact I'm wearing them now, I wear them 24/7, even sleep
in them. Since I got my Gorilla Glue I've used no other, my pint of
Elsie white stuff is all but abandoned.
Now that's impressive. Fixing eyeglasses. I tried that SuperGlue, but
it never held more than a few weeks. Barely held long enough for the
glue to set many times.

What exactly did you repair on the eyeglasses? Maybe the frame or
plastic that holds the lenses? That's a spot that often breaks. Or if
you sit on them, the nose can break.

The only time I had a repair actually work was on gold frames but the
person who could solder gold eyeglasses retired - and no one else was
willing to take that on, mostly chains now and people on computerized
machines. I did not ask jewelers who must be able to solder gold and
silver. Too bad, wonder where those frames are, since they were 10 k at
least and not plated. I better start looking for them :)
Sheldon
2006-03-02 23:55:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@yahoo.com
Post by Sheldon
The expansion factor during curing is a great thing, fills all the
voids. With Gorilla Glue one must get used to the fact that less is
more, is all. When joints are properly clamped, as they should be
with all glues, there will be no excessive gapping. And any glue that
does squeeze out is easily trimmed/sanded. Doesn't take more than 2-3
uses to realize how skimpily to apply Gorilla Glue. To date nothing
I've used it to glue has come apart. Gorilla Glue is great stuff... no
measuring/mixing either. The very first thing I repaired with Gorilla
Glue were my eyeglasses, one teensy dab paid for my little bottle of
Gorilla Glue 40 times over... and this was three years ago, glasses are
still fine, in fact I'm wearing them now, I wear them 24/7, even sleep
in them. Since I got my Gorilla Glue I've used no other, my pint of
Elsie white stuff is all but abandoned.
Now that's impressive. Fixing eyeglasses. I tried that SuperGlue, but
it never held more than a few weeks. Barely held long enough for the
glue to set many times.
What exactly did you repair on the eyeglasses?
The plastic section forming the nose bridge.
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