Discussion:
REC: Lemon Garlic Butter Shrimp
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US Janet
2021-11-18 05:03:37 UTC
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Quick and easy and tasty.

1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish

Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.

This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.

Janet US
Michael Trew
2021-11-18 07:15:21 UTC
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Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Yum! Sounds like a nice twist on my occasional "shrimp scampi".
Bruce
2021-11-18 07:41:14 UTC
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On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:15:21 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Yum! Sounds like a nice twist on my occasional "shrimp scampi".
grumble
Michael Trew
2021-11-19 07:15:46 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:15:21 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by US Janet
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Yum! Sounds like a nice twist on my occasional "shrimp scampi".
grumble
I put it into quotations!
Bruce
2021-11-19 08:19:25 UTC
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On Fri, 19 Nov 2021 02:15:46 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:15:21 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by US Janet
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Yum! Sounds like a nice twist on my occasional "shrimp scampi".
grumble
I put it into quotations!
Thank you :)
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-18 10:20:51 UTC
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Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).

Cindy Hamilton
US Janet
2021-11-18 17:53:36 UTC
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On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:20:51 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
Cindy Hamilton
I agree. I want more lemon but replacing all the water would be too
much. Probably a dash of white wine would give a little more kick to
the sauce. As stated by Michael, it is a basic scampi.
Janet US
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-18 20:34:09 UTC
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Post by US Janet
On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:20:51 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
Cindy Hamilton
I agree. I want more lemon but replacing all the water would be too
much. Probably a dash of white wine would give a little more kick to
the sauce. As stated by Michael, it is a basic scampi.
Janet US
Try a little zest. That'll give you a nice lemon flavor without adding
more acid.

Cindy Hamilton
Thomas
2021-11-21 16:15:06 UTC
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Post by US Janet
On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:20:51 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
Cindy Hamilton
I agree. I want more lemon but replacing all the water would be too
much. Probably a dash of white wine would give a little more kick to
the sauce. As stated by Michael, it is a basic scampi.
Janet US
I thought while growing up the lemon served in restaurants was to clean your fingers.
I would never add lemon to fresh seafood.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-21 16:41:09 UTC
Reply
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Post by Thomas
Post by US Janet
On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:20:51 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
Cindy Hamilton
I agree. I want more lemon but replacing all the water would be too
much. Probably a dash of white wine would give a little more kick to
the sauce. As stated by Michael, it is a basic scampi.
Janet US
I thought while growing up the lemon served in restaurants was to clean your fingers.
I would never add lemon to fresh seafood.
Tastes vary. I sometimes like a squeeze of lemon on grilled salmon. Sometimes
not. Leftover grilled salmon is always marinated in lemon vinaigrette for
subsequent use on a green salad.

Sometimes a squeeze of lemon on fried fish is good, too.

Cindy Hamilton
US Janet
2021-11-21 18:05:17 UTC
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Post by Thomas
Post by US Janet
On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 02:20:51 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
Cindy Hamilton
I agree. I want more lemon but replacing all the water would be too
much. Probably a dash of white wine would give a little more kick to
the sauce. As stated by Michael, it is a basic scampi.
Janet US
I thought while growing up the lemon served in restaurants was to clean your fingers.
I would never add lemon to fresh seafood.
There would be a special 'finger bowl' filled with water and perhaps
lemon for that. The lemon wouldn't be on your plate.
Janet US
bruce bowser
2021-11-18 20:02:30 UTC
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Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
I don't think i've ever tried Vermouth..
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-11-18 20:08:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
I don't think i've ever tried Vermouth..
It is a type of wine.
Graham
2021-11-18 20:12:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
I don't think i've ever tried Vermouth..
I keep a bottle of Noilly Prat in the fridge when I can get it. It's
ideal to keep on hand for fish and chicken dishes.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-18 20:33:09 UTC
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Post by Graham
Post by bruce bowser
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
I don't think i've ever tried Vermouth..
I keep a bottle of Noilly Prat in the fridge when I can get it. It's
ideal to keep on hand for fish and chicken dishes.
Nice. I scrape by with Martini and Rossi.

Cindy Hamilton
US Janet
2021-11-18 21:06:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 18 Nov 2021 12:02:30 -0800 (PST), bruce bowser
Post by bruce bowser
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Water doesn't bring any flavor to the party. I'd use wine. (In my case,
vermouth, because I don't drink wine and vermouth--being fortified--
keeps very well).
I don't think i've ever tried Vermouth..
Yoy'll see it often recommended for cooking
janet US
jmcquown
2021-11-18 21:20:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Thanks for posting this. I'm saving it. I have a pound of shrimp in
the freezer that was part of the "monthly special" from the local meat
market at the end of September. I've been wondering what to do with it.
I had thought perhaps marinating it (hadn't thought much about the
marinade), threading it on soaked wooden skewers, cooked quickly on the
grill. Shrimp cooks so fast it's probably not worth bothering with the
[charcoal] grill, though.

Jill
Jill
US Janet
2021-11-18 23:18:53 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
Thanks for posting this. I'm saving it. I have a pound of shrimp in
the freezer that was part of the "monthly special" from the local meat
market at the end of September. I've been wondering what to do with it.
I had thought perhaps marinating it (hadn't thought much about the
marinade), threading it on soaked wooden skewers, cooked quickly on the
grill. Shrimp cooks so fast it's probably not worth bothering with the
[charcoal] grill, though.
Jill
JillThis is pretty good and it is a no fuss dinner as well.
Janet US
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-18 23:42:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks for posting this. I'm saving it. I have a pound of shrimp in
the freezer that was part of the "monthly special" from the local meat
market at the end of September. I've been wondering what to do with it.
I had thought perhaps marinating it (hadn't thought much about the
marinade), threading it on soaked wooden skewers, cooked quickly on the
grill. Shrimp cooks so fast it's probably not worth bothering with the
[charcoal] grill, though.
Jill
If you want, try this for shrimp. I've made it a few times and it is always
a hit.


Spicy Shrimp

1 pound peeled and deveined shrimp

4 cloves of minced garlic (micro plane zester does a great job on this)

1/4 cup lemon juice (usually the yield of 1 lemon)

2 teaspoons lemon pepper

4 teaspoons seafood seasoning such as Old Bay

2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce

1/2 cup of vegetable oil

Whisk all together and pour over cleaned shrimp and marinate for at
least 30 minutes. Half of the sauce can be reserved to brush on the
shrimp while grilling if desired. This also can be quickly prepared in
a skillet on the stove. Either way gives great results and a grill
skillet can used if you don't want to skewer your shrimp for the grill.
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-19 00:15:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks for posting this. I'm saving it. I have a pound of shrimp in
the freezer that was part of the "monthly special" from the local meat
market at the end of September. I've been wondering what to do with it.
I had thought perhaps marinating it (hadn't thought much about the
marinade), threading it on soaked wooden skewers, cooked quickly on the
grill. Shrimp cooks so fast it's probably not worth bothering with the
[charcoal] grill, though.
Jill
If you want, try this for shrimp. I've made it a few times and it is always
a hit.
Spicy Shrimp
1 pound peeled and deveined shrimp
4 cloves of minced garlic (micro plane zester does a great job on this)
1/4 cup lemon juice (usually the yield of 1 lemon)
2 teaspoons lemon pepper
4 teaspoons seafood seasoning such as Old Bay
2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup of vegetable oil
Whisk all together and pour over cleaned shrimp and marinate for at
least 30 minutes. Half of the sauce can be reserved to brush on the
shrimp while grilling if desired. This also can be quickly prepared in
a skillet on the stove. Either way gives great results and a grill
skillet can used if you don't want to skewer your shrimp for the grill.
Thanks! I also have a small hibatchi, I tend to forget about it. Would
work perfectly for grilling the skewered marinated shrimp. :)
Jill
You're welcome and it is good stuff!

When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.

Loading Image...
jmcquown
2021-11-19 01:04:29 UTC
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Post by i***@webtv.net
Thanks for posting this. I'm saving it. I have a pound of shrimp in
the freezer that was part of the "monthly special" from the local meat
market at the end of September. I've been wondering what to do with it.
I had thought perhaps marinating it (hadn't thought much about the
marinade), threading it on soaked wooden skewers, cooked quickly on the
grill. Shrimp cooks so fast it's probably not worth bothering with the
[charcoal] grill, though.
Jill
If you want, try this for shrimp. I've made it a few times and it is always
a hit.
Spicy Shrimp
1 pound peeled and deveined shrimp
4 cloves of minced garlic (micro plane zester does a great job on this)
1/4 cup lemon juice (usually the yield of 1 lemon)
2 teaspoons lemon pepper
4 teaspoons seafood seasoning such as Old Bay
2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup of vegetable oil
Whisk all together and pour over cleaned shrimp and marinate for at
least 30 minutes. Half of the sauce can be reserved to brush on the
shrimp while grilling if desired. This also can be quickly prepared in
a skillet on the stove. Either way gives great results and a grill
skillet can used if you don't want to skewer your shrimp for the grill.
Thanks! I also have a small hibatchi, I tend to forget about it. Would
work perfectly for grilling the skewered marinated shrimp. :)
Jill
You're welcome and it is good stuff!
When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.
https://i.postimg.cc/NMywhZsR/Grill-pan.jpg
Oh! That's cute but I don't have one of those. I have a flat grill
basket for fish fillets which might work but again, probably not worth
firing up the Weber kettle. The hibatchi should work for the skewered
shrimp. Fewer coals for such quick cooking.

Shrimp season has just ended here. There won't be any fresh shrimp
running until next Spring.

Jill
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-19 03:21:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.
https://i.postimg.cc/NMywhZsR/Grill-pan.jpg
Oh! That's cute but I don't have one of those. I have a flat grill
basket for fish fillets which might work but again, probably not worth
firing up the Weber kettle. The hibatchi should work for the skewered
shrimp. Fewer coals for such quick cooking.
Mine doesn't have the wooden handle, just something else to char.
Shrimp season has just ended here. There won't be any fresh shrimp
running until next Spring.
Jill
Maybe you can find some decent frozen ones.
bruce bowser
2021-11-20 16:07:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by i***@webtv.net
When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.
https://i.postimg.cc/NMywhZsR/Grill-pan.jpg
Oh! That's cute but I don't have one of those. I have a flat grill
basket for fish fillets which might work but again, probably not worth
firing up the Weber kettle. The hibatchi should work for the skewered
shrimp. Fewer coals for such quick cooking.
Mine doesn't have the wooden handle, just something else to char.
Shrimp season has just ended here. There won't be any fresh shrimp
running until next Spring.
Jill
Maybe you can find some decent frozen ones.
Many times, cooking is too labor intensive. The heck with it. Just go out.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-20 16:10:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by i***@webtv.net
When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.
https://i.postimg.cc/NMywhZsR/Grill-pan.jpg
Oh! That's cute but I don't have one of those. I have a flat grill
basket for fish fillets which might work but again, probably not worth
firing up the Weber kettle. The hibatchi should work for the skewered
shrimp. Fewer coals for such quick cooking.
Mine doesn't have the wooden handle, just something else to char.
Shrimp season has just ended here. There won't be any fresh shrimp
running until next Spring.
Jill
Maybe you can find some decent frozen ones.
Many times, cooking is too labor intensive. The heck with it. Just go out.
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.

Cindy Hamilton
GM
2021-11-20 16:22:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by i***@webtv.net
When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.
https://i.postimg.cc/NMywhZsR/Grill-pan.jpg
Oh! That's cute but I don't have one of those. I have a flat grill
basket for fish fillets which might work but again, probably not worth
firing up the Weber kettle. The hibatchi should work for the skewered
shrimp. Fewer coals for such quick cooking.
Mine doesn't have the wooden handle, just something else to char.
Shrimp season has just ended here. There won't be any fresh shrimp
running until next Spring.
Jill
Maybe you can find some decent frozen ones.
Many times, cooking is too labor intensive. The heck with it. Just go out.
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.
It's getting more expensive to dine out. Plus, since I'm old and grouchy I tire of the "vagaries"
of dining out, e.g. service variations, having to endure other customers, possible hygiene issues,
seating comfort, etc...

I'm okay with take - out, but I rarely "dine out" anymore, maybe with a friend once in a great while...
--
GM
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-20 16:50:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by i***@webtv.net
When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.
https://i.postimg.cc/NMywhZsR/Grill-pan.jpg
Oh! That's cute but I don't have one of those. I have a flat grill
basket for fish fillets which might work but again, probably not worth
firing up the Weber kettle. The hibatchi should work for the skewered
shrimp. Fewer coals for such quick cooking.
Mine doesn't have the wooden handle, just something else to char.
Shrimp season has just ended here. There won't be any fresh shrimp
running until next Spring.
Jill
Maybe you can find some decent frozen ones.
Many times, cooking is too labor intensive. The heck with it. Just go out.
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.
It's getting more expensive to dine out. Plus, since I'm old and grouchy I tire of the "vagaries"
of dining out, e.g. service variations, having to endure other customers, possible hygiene issues,
seating comfort, etc...
I'm okay with take - out, but I rarely "dine out" anymore, maybe with a friend once in a great while...
Quite a few meals are not as good in take-out form. The first thing I did when
restrictions eased was go out for tempura.

We've had a long-time habit of going to restaurants outside the lunch and
dinner rushes (usually before). Same thing with movies: the first matinee
on Sunday morning.

Cindy Hamilton
Dave Smith
2021-11-20 17:17:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by GM
I'm okay with take - out, but I rarely "dine out" anymore, maybe with a friend once in a great while...
Quite a few meals are not as good in take-out form. The first thing I did when
restrictions eased was go out for tempura.
We tried take out a few times and the results were generally
disappointing. We had low expectations because he had been getting fish
and chips from the Lion's Club fund raising fish fry. I would slip over
the to park, wait in line, get the fish and chips right our of the fryer
and scoot home, about 6 minutes, and even that short time in a covered
box was enough to make them soggy. We tried a few other things like
tacos and beef melts. It just wasn't as good by the time we got home.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
We've had a long-time habit of going to restaurants outside the lunch and
dinner rushes (usually before). Same thing with movies: the first matinee
on Sunday morning.
That's a good way to avoid exposure in a pandemic.
Michael Trew
2021-11-21 02:54:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Quite a few meals are not as good in take-out form. The first thing I
did when
restrictions eased was go out for tempura.
We tried take out a few times and the results were generally
disappointing. We had low expectations because he had been getting fish
and chips from the Lion's Club fund raising fish fry. I would slip over
the to park, wait in line, get the fish and chips right our of the fryer
and scoot home, about 6 minutes, and even that short time in a covered
box was enough to make them soggy. We tried a few other things like
tacos and beef melts. It just wasn't as good by the time we got home.
My favorite fish-fry place here was only eat-in. That probably had a
fair bit to do with it. That and fresh cut fries; not frozen.
Post by Dave Smith
We've had a long-time habit of going to restaurants outside the lunch and
dinner rushes (usually before). Same thing with movies: the first matinee
on Sunday morning.
That's a good way to avoid exposure in a pandemic.
How long are you going to hide in a box? Until you are dead? Unless
you have severe heath concerns, try to enjoy life.
US Janet
2021-11-20 16:50:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 08:10:17 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.
Cindy Hamilton
ditto
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-20 23:36:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 08:10:17 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.
Cindy Hamilton
Agreed, reststurant food is mostly disappointing. I'll eat out when
it's food I don't have easy access too, like now I can't get fresh
shellfish. For most of our lives we lived within walking distance of
the sea, we very well know fresh seafood. We don't want anyone to
serve us a steak either, mostly a major disappointment, we'd much
rather buy and cook our own. In all my years no eatery has ever
served us a decent beef steak. It's all mystery meat.
The best meat I've ever eaten out is tube steak; Nathans Famous.
If we want steak it very easy to buy and cook our own. And our
favorite is a thick chuck steak on the Weber, medium rare. My wife
who is not a very good cook is doing very well on the new Weber. She's
doing fantastic with fresh veggies, and my fresh ground burgers. She's
the mistress of bell peppers... I core and seed, she grills.
jmcquown
2021-11-20 23:50:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 08:10:17 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.
Cindy Hamilton
Agreed, reststurant food is mostly disappointing. I'll eat out when
it's food I don't have easy access too, like now I can't get fresh
shellfish. For most of our lives we lived within walking distance of
the sea, we very well know fresh seafood. We don't want anyone to
serve us a steak either, mostly a major disappointment, we'd much
rather buy and cook our own. In all my years no eatery has ever
served us a decent beef steak. It's all mystery meat.
No it isn't. Do you butcher your own cows?
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best meat I've ever eaten out is tube steak; Nathans Famous.
If we want steak it very easy to buy and cook our own.
Uh huh... is it mystery steak?
Post by Sheldon Martin
And our
favorite is a thick chuck steak on the Weber, medium rare.
I like chuck-eye steaks which is not the same thing as chuck steaks.
Chuck-eyes are cut from right next to the ribeye. Nicely marbled,
nicely tender and full of flavour. Grilled to no more than medium rare
or cooked (oh my) in a cast iron skillet on the stovetop. First salted
and peppered and allowed to dry brine for a hours, then yes, cooked to
medium rare. Nice sear from the cast iron.
Post by Sheldon Martin
My wife
who is not a very good cook is doing very well on the new Weber. She's
doing fantastic with fresh veggies, and my fresh ground burgers. She's
the mistress of bell peppers... I core and seed, she grills.
That's nice. I'm not a fan of bell peppers, grilled or not. Enjoy!

Jill
Michael Trew
2021-11-21 02:56:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
That's nice. I'm not a fan of bell peppers, grilled or not. Enjoy!
Jill
Not a fan of bell peppers??

I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-21 04:21:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Green = not ripe
Red = ripe
GM
2021-11-21 04:25:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Michael Trew
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Green = not ripe
Red = ripe
Yup, I've not touched green bell peppers in years, they are "raw" and even upset my stomach
a bit... only red, orange and yellow will do...
--
GM
Michael Trew
2021-11-21 23:15:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by GM
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Michael Trew
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Green = not ripe
Red = ripe
Yup, I've not touched green bell peppers in years, they are "raw" and even upset my stomach
a bit... only red, orange and yellow will do...
Really? I wonder why green bell peppers are so common in stores,
recipes, and otherwise? Is it a flavor thing for people who prefer
bitter? I like green in chili and other cooked dishes, but with stuffed
peppers, they are too much.
Dave Smith
2021-11-22 01:16:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of bell
peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are an
essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy trinity").
But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be interested in
eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
That is my generally attitude about green bell peppers, but I find the
red ones much more palatable.
Thomas
2021-11-22 01:32:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of bell
peppers. I use them in certain dishes (finely diced). They are an
essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy trinity").
But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be interested in
eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
That is my generally attitude about green bell peppers, but I find the
red ones much more palatable.
It is like a US traffic light.
JK probably does not pay attention to yellow.
Green go at it.
Yellow who cares.
Red, be patient then go.
Either choice is a wreck.
Mike Duffy
2021-11-22 02:44:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of bell
peppers. I use them in certain dishes (finely diced). They are an
essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy trinity").
I always peel mine. The texture improves and they seem to be less bitter.
US Janet
2021-11-22 04:41:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by GM
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Michael Trew
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Green = not ripe
Red = ripe
Yup, I've not touched green bell peppers in years, they are "raw" and
even upset my stomach
a bit... only red, orange and yellow will do...
Really?  I wonder why green bell peppers are so common in stores,
recipes, and otherwise?  Is it a flavor thing for people who prefer
bitter?  I like green in chili and other cooked dishes, but with stuffed
peppers, they are too much.
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of bell
peppers. I use them in certain dishes (finely diced). They are an
essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy trinity").
But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be interested in
eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
Jill
more for me, I don't care fot the yelow and orange ones -- they're
too mild.
Janet US
Dave Smith
2021-11-22 14:28:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of bell
peppers. I use them in certain dishes (finely diced). They are an
essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy trinity").
But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be interested in
eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
Jill
more for me, I don't care fot the yelow and orange ones -- they're
too mild.
Green peppers have their place. I prefer red. My wife likes to get the
yellow and orange because they are pretty.
Bruce
2021-11-22 18:51:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 09:28:54 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by US Janet
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of bell
peppers. I use them in certain dishes (finely diced). They are an
essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy trinity").
But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be interested in
eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
Jill
more for me, I don't care fot the yelow and orange ones -- they're
too mild.
Green peppers have their place. I prefer red. My wife likes to get the
yellow and orange because they are pretty.
That's how wifeys roll, isn't it?
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-22 10:43:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by GM
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Michael Trew
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Green = not ripe
Red = ripe
Yup, I've not touched green bell peppers in years, they are "raw" and even upset my stomach
a bit... only red, orange and yellow will do...
Really? I wonder why green bell peppers are so common in stores,
recipes, and otherwise? Is it a flavor thing for people who prefer
bitter? I like green in chili and other cooked dishes, but with stuffed
peppers, they are too much.
Because they're cheaper. It costs more to ripen peppers and bring them
to market.

Cindy Hamilton
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-22 14:40:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by GM
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Michael Trew
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Green = not ripe
Red = ripe
Yup, I've not touched green bell peppers in years, they are "raw" and even upset my stomach
a bit... only red, orange and yellow will do...
Really? I wonder why green bell peppers are so common in stores,
recipes, and otherwise? Is it a flavor thing for people who prefer
bitter? I like green in chili and other cooked dishes, but with stuffed
peppers, they are too much.
Because they're cheaper. It costs more to ripen peppers and bring them
to market.
Cindy Hamilton
Green peppers have advantages. Eat it once, taste and burp it for three
days.

I'll pay the extra for a ripe one.
Dave Smith
2021-11-22 16:12:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Because they're cheaper.  It costs more to ripen peppers and bring them
to market.
Cindy Hamilton
Green peppers have advantages.  Eat it once, taste and burp it for three
days.
I'll pay the extra for a ripe one.
Once in a while I have pickled herring with sour cream and onions and a
beer. It is an amazing flavour combination, and you get to enjoy it for
at leas three days.
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-22 18:48:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 02:43:38 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by GM
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Michael Trew
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Green = not ripe
Red = ripe
Yup, I've not touched green bell peppers in years, they are "raw" and even upset my stomach
a bit... only red, orange and yellow will do...
Really? I wonder why green bell peppers are so common in stores,
recipes, and otherwise? Is it a flavor thing for people who prefer
bitter? I like green in chili and other cooked dishes, but with stuffed
peppers, they are too much.
Because they're cheaper. It costs more to ripen peppers and bring them
to market.
Green bell peppers keep longer. We grow a lot of bell peppers. We
like bell peppers in all stages of ripeness. Green bell peppers are
excellent sauted. I actually prefer the green bell peppers cooked. Red
bell peppers are better raw for a tossed salad, but green works well
too.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-22 20:04:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 02:43:38 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by GM
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Michael Trew
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter. However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Green = not ripe
Red = ripe
Yup, I've not touched green bell peppers in years, they are "raw" and even upset my stomach
a bit... only red, orange and yellow will do...
Really? I wonder why green bell peppers are so common in stores,
recipes, and otherwise? Is it a flavor thing for people who prefer
bitter? I like green in chili and other cooked dishes, but with stuffed
peppers, they are too much.
Because they're cheaper. It costs more to ripen peppers and bring them
to market.
Green bell peppers keep longer. We grow a lot of bell peppers. We
like bell peppers in all stages of ripeness. Green bell peppers are
excellent sauted. I actually prefer the green bell peppers cooked. Red
bell peppers are better raw for a tossed salad, but green works well
too.
Popeye, do yoose grow 50 pound bell peppers?
Gary
2021-11-22 14:23:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of bell
peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are an
essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy trinity").
But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be interested in
eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie? :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
Dave Smith
2021-11-22 14:38:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie?  :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
Nice Julie topic troll there Gary.
Bruce
2021-11-22 18:49:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of bell
peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are an
essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy trinity").
But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be interested in
eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie? :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
He's switched to Ophelia and the many computer savvy ways Ophelia's
been slipping past his "filters". He's very upset.
jmcquown
2021-11-23 02:12:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie?  :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
I have no idea why you are obsessed with her but you're stupid for
continuing to compare the two of us.

Jill
Bruce
2021-11-23 02:16:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie?  :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
I have no idea why you are obsessed with her but you're stupid for
continuing to compare the two of us.
I think you're a cross between Julie (don't like this, don't like
that) and Dave (judgmental, bitchy, narrow-minded).

I'd prefer Julie over both of ya.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-23 03:25:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by jmcquown
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie?  :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
I have no idea why you are obsessed with her but you're stupid for
continuing to compare the two of us.
I think you're a cross between Julie (don't like this, don't like
that) and Dave (judgmental, bitchy, narrow-minded).
I'd prefer Julie over both of ya.
You should contact her. You can run off the gardener and move in
together to make a lovely couple. Be sure to let us know how the
romance goes.
jmcquown
2021-11-23 03:40:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by jmcquown
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie?  :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
I have no idea why you are obsessed with her but you're stupid for
continuing to compare the two of us.
I think you're a cross between Julie (don't like this, don't like
that) and Dave (judgmental, bitchy, narrow-minded).
I'd prefer Julie over both of ya.
You should contact her.  You can run off the gardener and move in
together to make a lovely couple.  Be sure to let us know how the
romance goes.
Oh, I didn't know Bruce was an Ethopian immigrant who could displace a
goat raising gardener. Green bell peppers... have a place in cooking
but don't want to eat raw or stuffed green bell peppers. Oh so sorry.
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when? We know Bruce
doesn't cook.

Jill
Bruce
2021-11-23 03:58:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Oh, I didn't know Bruce was an Ethopian immigrant who could displace a
goat raising gardener. Green bell peppers... have a place in cooking
but don't want to eat raw or stuffed green bell peppers. Oh so sorry.
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when? We know Bruce
doesn't cook.
Jill, I thought I was a troll. Stop feeding me then!
Hank Rogers
2021-11-23 04:13:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by jmcquown
Oh, I didn't know Bruce was an Ethopian immigrant who could displace a
goat raising gardener. Green bell peppers... have a place in cooking
but don't want to eat raw or stuffed green bell peppers. Oh so sorry.
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when? We know Bruce
doesn't cook.
Jill, I thought I was a troll. Stop feeding me then!
I always suspected you could subsist on butt fumes, master.
Gary
2021-11-23 14:15:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when?  We know Bruce
doesn't cook.
I cook often, Jill, and since you wondered I'll tell you. I always cook
large (for more than one meal).

Saturday, I made about a half gallon of chicken vegetable noodle soup.
Very tasty and will last me several days having only a cup or so at a
time. It's an appetizer, not complete meal.

Sunday, I made homemade spaghetti sauce, also from scratch. 2 cans of
tomato sauce, seasonings (mostly oregano and lots of basil), large
chopped onion, 2 garlic cloves (smashed and minced) and for meat, I
cooked and added ground hot (spicy) breakfast sausage. It gave the sauce
a nice tang. yum. I still have enough of that for today and tomorrow.

Neither will see my freezer. What I cook, I like so I don't mind
leftovers for a few days. When I want a quick meal in the evenings, good
leftovers in a bowl to quickly heat up is perfect.

And finally - I made a peach cobbler this morning. The Terry Combs
wife's recipe. It's a good one. It's in the oven right now and should be
done in 3 more minutes or so. That dessert should also last me several days.

Bottom line, I cook often but rarely post about it. Just normal food and
not anything to brag about.
jmcquown
2021-11-23 23:00:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Bottom line, I cook often but rarely post about it. Just normal food and
not anything to brag about.
This is a cooking newsgroup. Even if it's normal every day food, so
what? Instead you insist on making snarky remarks about how I'm like
Julie (with a smiley!) as often as possible. So what if I don't like
raw green bell peppers or stuffed bell peppers? I use bell peppers
where they fit with the recipe. That doesn't make me any different from
(I daresay) millions of other people.

Jill
US Janet
2021-11-23 23:13:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Gary
Bottom line, I cook often but rarely post about it. Just normal food and
not anything to brag about.
This is a cooking newsgroup. Even if it's normal every day food, so
what? Instead you insist on making snarky remarks about how I'm like
Julie (with a smiley!) as often as possible. So what if I don't like
raw green bell peppers or stuffed bell peppers? I use bell peppers
where they fit with the recipe. That doesn't make me any different from
(I daresay) millions of other people.
Jill
green peppers are more pungent but I just can't use anything else for
stuffed peppers. Now we've done it! Its Thanksgiving time and I am
craving stuffed peppers again. Huge green peppers with a really thick
wall, just past al dente when put on the plate. yum ;)
Janet US
Gary
2021-11-24 14:09:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
green peppers are more pungent but I just can't use anything else for
stuffed peppers. Now we've done it! Its Thanksgiving time and I am
craving stuffed peppers again. Huge green peppers with a really thick
wall, just past al dente when put on the plate. yum ;)
I've never cared for raw green peppers like in a tossed salad.
I only have 2 uses these days:

I'll blacken one over a gas burner flame. Then seed and chop up and
freeze (one pepper per bag). I use that for baked beans.

My other use is to make stuffed green peppers. I love that meal. I
usually make 4 at a time and that's 4 great meals along with bread and
butter.
Gary
2021-11-24 13:58:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Gary
Bottom line, I cook often but rarely post about it. Just normal food
and not anything to brag about.
This is a cooking newsgroup.
Hmmm. I should have noticed that years ago. Oh well.
Post by jmcquown
Even if it's normal every day food, so
what?  Instead you insist on making snarky remarks about how I'm like
Julie (with a smiley!) as often as possible.  So what if I don't like
raw green bell peppers or stuffed bell peppers?  I use bell peppers
where they fit with the recipe.  That doesn't make me any different from
(I daresay) millions of other people.
I only joke you, Jill, is because you have almost as many dislikes as
Julie had yet you always joked her about that. It must be a Princess thing.
US Janet
2021-11-24 16:55:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by jmcquown
Post by Gary
Bottom line, I cook often but rarely post about it. Just normal food
and not anything to brag about.
This is a cooking newsgroup.
Hmmm. I should have noticed that years ago. Oh well.
snip

We all cook different kinds of food. If we post about it, it may get
someone willing to try something new. A good tip may come from
someone's post.
As long as someone doesn't get really snarky, there is so much to talk
about.
Different cuts of meat (I hadn't thought of or seen chuck steaks since
university) Now that my city population has grown I am beginning to
see them around here.
All kinds of stuff to talk about even if it is mundane.
Janet US
Michael Trew
2021-11-24 17:41:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by jmcquown
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when? We know Bruce
doesn't cook.
I cook often, Jill, and since you wondered I'll tell you. I always cook
large (for more than one meal).
Saturday, I made about a half gallon of chicken vegetable noodle soup.
Very tasty and will last me several days having only a cup or so at a
time. It's an appetizer, not complete meal.
Sunday, I made homemade spaghetti sauce, also from scratch. 2 cans of
tomato sauce, seasonings (mostly oregano and lots of basil), large
chopped onion, 2 garlic cloves (smashed and minced) and for meat, I
cooked and added ground hot (spicy) breakfast sausage. It gave the sauce
a nice tang. yum. I still have enough of that for today and tomorrow.
Neither will see my freezer. What I cook, I like so I don't mind
leftovers for a few days. When I want a quick meal in the evenings, good
leftovers in a bowl to quickly heat up is perfect.
And finally - I made a peach cobbler this morning. The Terry Combs
wife's recipe. It's a good one. It's in the oven right now and should be
done in 3 more minutes or so. That dessert should also last me several days.
Bottom line, I cook often but rarely post about it. Just normal food and
not anything to brag about.
Why not post about it? I'd love to read more cooking posts, it might
help offset the Kuthe madness.
bruce bowser
2021-11-24 20:05:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by jmcquown
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when? We know Bruce
doesn't cook.
I cook often, Jill, and since you wondered I'll tell you. I always cook
large (for more than one meal).
Saturday, I made about a half gallon of chicken vegetable noodle soup.
Very tasty and will last me several days having only a cup or so at a
time. It's an appetizer, not complete meal.
Sunday, I made homemade spaghetti sauce, also from scratch. 2 cans of
tomato sauce, seasonings (mostly oregano and lots of basil), large
chopped onion, 2 garlic cloves (smashed and minced) and for meat, I
cooked and added ground hot (spicy) breakfast sausage. It gave the sauce
a nice tang. yum. I still have enough of that for today and tomorrow.
Neither will see my freezer. What I cook, I like so I don't mind
leftovers for a few days. When I want a quick meal in the evenings, good
leftovers in a bowl to quickly heat up is perfect.
And finally - I made a peach cobbler this morning. The Terry Combs
wife's recipe. It's a good one. It's in the oven right now and should be
done in 3 more minutes or so. That dessert should also last me several days.
Bottom line, I cook often but rarely post about it. Just normal food and
not anything to brag about.
Why not post about it? I'd love to read more cooking posts, it might
help offset the Kuthe madness.
Nooo, that would be letting usual off too easy. We can't have that!
jmcquown
2021-11-24 23:47:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when?  We know Bruce
doesn't cook.
I cook often, Jill, and since you wondered I'll tell you. I always cook
large (for more than one meal).
Saturday, I made about a half gallon of chicken vegetable noodle soup.
Very tasty and will last me several days having only a cup or so at a
time. It's an appetizer, not complete meal.
Sunday, I made homemade spaghetti sauce, also from scratch. 2 cans of
tomato sauce, seasonings (mostly oregano and lots of basil), large
chopped onion, 2 garlic cloves (smashed and minced) and for meat, I
cooked and added ground hot (spicy) breakfast sausage. It gave the sauce
a nice tang. yum. I still have enough of that for today and tomorrow.
Neither will see my freezer. What I cook, I like so I don't mind
leftovers for a few days. When I want a quick meal in the evenings, good
leftovers in a bowl to quickly heat up is perfect.
And finally - I made a peach cobbler this morning. The Terry Combs
wife's recipe. It's a good one. It's in the oven right now and should be
done in 3 more minutes or so. That dessert should also last me several days.
Bottom line, I cook often but rarely post about it. Just normal food and
not anything to brag about.
Why not post about it?  I'd love to read more cooking posts, it might
help offset the Kuthe madness.
Gary has already said it's mundane and boring and he'd rather post his
idea of comparisons between me and a former poster and our food
dislikes. He's a keeper of lists. He also brings up that former poster
to get a rise out of Dave. Troll light. Also easier to stay in the
Bruces good graces that way. Heh.

Why talk about food when you can jump in and criticize the women posters
who are trying to talk about food?

Jill
Bruce
2021-11-24 23:49:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Why not post about it?  I'd love to read more cooking posts, it might
help offset the Kuthe madness.
Gary has already said it's mundane and boring and he'd rather post his
idea of comparisons between me and a former poster and our food
dislikes. He's a keeper of lists. He also brings up that former poster
to get a rise out of Dave. Troll light. Also easier to stay in the
Bruces good graces that way. Heh.
I'm in your head! Let me out, McGossip!

bruce bowser
2021-11-23 19:15:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Bruce
Post by jmcquown
Post by Gary
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers. I use them in certain dishes (finely diced). They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie? :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
I have no idea why you are obsessed with her but you're stupid for
continuing to compare the two of us.
I think you're a cross between Julie (don't like this, don't like
that) and Dave (judgmental, bitchy, narrow-minded).
I'd prefer Julie over both of ya.
You should contact her. You can run off the gardener and move in
together to make a lovely couple. Be sure to let us know how the
romance goes.
Oh, I didn't know Bruce was an Ethopian immigrant
No sh!t, really? What town was one of the Bruce trolls born in?
Post by jmcquown
who could displace a goat raising gardener.
I'd be scared to raise goats. They can head-butt you in the balls (if you're a guy), Jill. They don't joke around. Don't you look at Youtube?
Post by jmcquown
Green bell peppers... have a place in cooking
Only italian. Don't use the stuff with anything else, please. OK?
Post by jmcquown
but don't want to eat raw or stuffed green bell peppers. Oh so sorry.
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when? We know Bruce
doesn't cook.
How many times do I have to tell you, Jill. If its beyond zapping, just go out. Who slaves in a kitchen these days?
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-23 20:16:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 23 Nov 2021 11:15:28 -0800 (PST), bruce bowser
Post by bruce bowser
Post by jmcquown
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Bruce
Post by jmcquown
Post by Gary
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers. I use them in certain dishes (finely diced). They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie? :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
I have no idea why you are obsessed with her but you're stupid for
continuing to compare the two of us.
I think you're a cross between Julie (don't like this, don't like
that) and Dave (judgmental, bitchy, narrow-minded).
I'd prefer Julie over both of ya.
You should contact her. You can run off the gardener and move in
together to make a lovely couple. Be sure to let us know how the
romance goes.
Oh, I didn't know Bruce was an Ethopian immigrant
No sh!t, really? What town was one of the Bruce trolls born in?
Post by jmcquown
who could displace a goat raising gardener.
I'd be scared to raise goats. They can head-butt you in the balls (if you're a guy), Jill. They don't joke around. Don't you look at Youtube?
Post by jmcquown
Green bell peppers... have a place in cooking
Only italian. Don't use the stuff with anything else, please. OK?
Post by jmcquown
but don't want to eat raw or stuffed green bell peppers. Oh so sorry.
What was the last thing Gary actually cooked and when? We know Bruce
doesn't cook.
How many times do I have to tell you, Jill. If its beyond zapping, just go out. Who slaves in a kitchen these days?
bruce bowser
2021-11-23 19:18:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by jmcquown
Post by Gary
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers. I use them in certain dishes (finely diced). They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie? :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
I have no idea why you are obsessed with her but you're stupid for
continuing to compare the two of us.
I think you're a cross between Julie (don't like this, don't like
that) and Dave (judgmental, bitchy, narrow-minded).
I'd prefer Julie over both of ya.
You should contact her. You can run off the gardener and move in
together to make a lovely couple. Be sure to let us know how the
romance goes.
How do you know what her face an body look like, though? She probably has one of her girls-nite-out collaborators pretending to be her. Hey! You never know.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-23 04:10:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by jmcquown
I can't speak for anyone else but I simply don't like the taste of
bell peppers.  I use them in certain dishes (finely diced).  They are
an essential flavour component to things like gumbo (the "holy
trinity"). But I don't like stuffed bell peppers and wouldn't be
interested in eating grilled bell peppers regardless.
How have you been, Julie?  :-D
Dave here has missed your posts.
I have no idea why you are obsessed with her but you're stupid for
continuing to compare the two of us.
I think you're a cross between Julie (don't like this, don't like
that) and Dave (judgmental, bitchy, narrow-minded).
I'd prefer Julie over both of ya.
We know. You fell in love the first time julie farted in your face.
That lady did love beans.
jmcquown
2021-11-21 14:02:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
That's nice.  I'm not a fan of bell peppers, grilled or not.  Enjoy!
Jill
Not a fan of bell peppers??
I am not a fan of raw ones, and the way that grandma cooked stuffed
green peppers left them a bit too bitter.  However, as suggested here,
when I left mine on the plant until mostly red, they were wonderful in
chili, diced into eggs, potato hash, etc.
Bell peppers have their place in cooking but don't expect me to eat
grilled bell peppers happily.

Jill
Hank Rogers
2021-11-20 23:53:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 08:10:17 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.
Cindy Hamilton
Agreed, reststurant food is mostly disappointing. I'll eat out when
it's food I don't have easy access too, like now I can't get fresh
shellfish. For most of our lives we lived within walking distance of
the sea, we very well know fresh seafood. We don't want anyone to
serve us a steak either, mostly a major disappointment, we'd much
rather buy and cook our own. In all my years no eatery has ever
served us a decent beef steak. It's all mystery meat.
The best meat I've ever eaten out is tube steak; Nathans Famous.
If we want steak it very easy to buy and cook our own. And our
favorite is a thick chuck steak on the Weber, medium rare. My wife
who is not a very good cook is doing very well on the new Weber. She's
doing fantastic with fresh veggies, and my fresh ground burgers. She's
the mistress of bell peppers... I core and seed, she grills.
She was also the mistress of that donkey show down in honduras. The
jacks still bray for kathy.

Back when yoose was sailing, right after yoose aunt stopped fucking
you. Remember Popeye?
Bruce
2021-11-20 17:07:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 08:10:17 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by i***@webtv.net
When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.
https://i.postimg.cc/NMywhZsR/Grill-pan.jpg
Oh! That's cute but I don't have one of those. I have a flat grill
basket for fish fillets which might work but again, probably not worth
firing up the Weber kettle. The hibatchi should work for the skewered
shrimp. Fewer coals for such quick cooking.
Mine doesn't have the wooden handle, just something else to char.
Shrimp season has just ended here. There won't be any fresh shrimp
running until next Spring.
Jill
Maybe you can find some decent frozen ones.
Many times, cooking is too labor intensive. The heck with it. Just go out.
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.
Maybe you're a better cook than him. Maybe you're more precious than
him about exactly how you want your food. Maybe he has better
restaurants close.
jmcquown
2021-11-20 18:19:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by i***@webtv.net
When I say 'grill skillet' I'm meaning one of those grill pans with the holes in
it we've discussed here in the past.
https://i.postimg.cc/NMywhZsR/Grill-pan.jpg
Oh! That's cute but I don't have one of those. I have a flat grill
basket for fish fillets which might work but again, probably not worth
firing up the Weber kettle. The hibatchi should work for the skewered
shrimp. Fewer coals for such quick cooking.
Mine doesn't have the wooden handle, just something else to char.
Shrimp season has just ended here. There won't be any fresh shrimp
running until next Spring.
Jill
Maybe you can find some decent frozen ones.
Many times, cooking is too labor intensive. The heck with it. Just go out.
IOW, you'd rather find some cheap Chinese buffet stuff because you don't
cook.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Many times, restaurant food is not as good as my own. The heck with it. Just stay in.
Cindy Hamilton
So true! If I'm going out to eat (rare) it's to get food I can't be
bothered to cook at home, such as deep fried stuff so I don't have to
deal with the splatter, oil storage and cleanup. Restaurants are good
for that. Except I rarely have any need for deep fried food so... I
stay in and cook really well for myself.

Frozen shrimp is available year round in different sizes, peeled, not
peeled, etc. regardless of the season. It's not something I go out of
my way to look for. I happen to have a pound of it in the freezer and
this is one of a couple ideas for using it. Bowser is welcome to the
last of the Chinese buffet when they mark down crappy cheap food.

Jill
Michael Trew
2021-11-21 03:00:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Frozen shrimp is available year round in different sizes, peeled, not
peeled, etc. regardless of the season. It's not something I go out of
my way to look for. I happen to have a pound of it in the freezer and
this is one of a couple ideas for using it. Bowser is welcome to the
last of the Chinese buffet when they mark down crappy cheap food.
Jill
I love home cooking, and that's my preference. Don't knock an
occasional Chinese buffet though! Most of that spread that I
occasionally get a craving for is too much of a hassle to do at home.
GM
2021-11-21 03:19:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Frozen shrimp is available year round in different sizes, peeled, not
peeled, etc. regardless of the season. It's not something I go out of
my way to look for. I happen to have a pound of it in the freezer and
this is one of a couple ideas for using it. Bowser is welcome to the
last of the Chinese buffet when they mark down crappy cheap food.
Jill
I love home cooking, and that's my preference. Don't knock an
occasional Chinese buffet though! Most of that spread that I
occasionally get a craving for is too much of a hassle to do at home.
I'll get Chinese/Thai take - out, they have a certain "taste" that I can't seem to imitate at home...

As for buffets and salad bars, I eschewed them long ago. It oogies me out to use serving
utensils that other patrons have handled, and people do all kinds of gross stuff in buffets,
e.g. picking through food with their hands, etc... and little kids will have their filthy mitts
all over everything, just watch...

Same with food bars in grocery stores. If I'm getting, say, fried chicken, I'll ask for it at the
deli counter instead of picking it out of the hot food bar... fewer "hands" potentially fingering it...

The grossest stuff I saw was at an olive bar at a now - shuttered Chicago grocery store (Treasure
Island), an "upscale" place. Peeps would pick out olives with their hands... one time I saw a woman
pick out and eat an olive, and then DEPOSIT the pit back into the olive bar... EEK...!!!

The more expensive the grocery, often the grosser, I see this stuff at my local Whole Foods, too...
--
GM
jmcquown
2021-11-21 14:05:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Frozen shrimp is available year round in different sizes, peeled, not
peeled, etc. regardless of the season.  It's not something I go out of
my way to look for.  I happen to have a pound of it in the freezer and
this is one of a couple ideas for using it.  Bowser is welcome to the
last of the Chinese buffet when they mark down crappy cheap food.
Jill
I love home cooking, and that's my preference.  Don't knock an
occasional Chinese buffet though!  Most of that spread that I
occasionally get a craving for is too much of a hassle to do at home.
I wasn't really knocking the idea of a Chinese buffet, merely bowsers'
mention of waiting until it's marked down (inference: been sitting there
for hours so they're practically giving it away.) I want my food to be
fresh. Buffets, in general, are a turn-off. Food sitting out on steam
tables for who knows how long. No thanks!

Jill
Dave Smith
2021-11-21 15:26:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
I love home cooking, and that's my preference.  Don't knock an
occasional Chinese buffet though!  Most of that spread that I
occasionally get a craving for is too much of a hassle to do at home.
I wasn't really knocking the idea of a Chinese buffet, merely bowsers'
mention of waiting until it's marked down (inference: been sitting there
for hours so they're practically giving it away.)  I want my food to be
fresh.  Buffets, in general, are a turn-off.  Food sitting out on steam
tables for who knows how long.  No thanks!
I have posted before about the Mandarin Chinese buffet that has a number
of places in southern Ontario. They have a really wide selection of
foods, including pizza, roast beef and lamb in addition to their Chinese
and other Asian dishes. They bring the food out in small batches so it
gets eaten up before it gets cold and soggy. You can hang out by the
buffet and just take the stuff that is fresh out of the kitchen.
Bruce
2021-11-21 18:56:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 10:26:21 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by jmcquown
I love home cooking, and that's my preference.  Don't knock an
occasional Chinese buffet though!  Most of that spread that I
occasionally get a craving for is too much of a hassle to do at home.
I wasn't really knocking the idea of a Chinese buffet, merely bowsers'
mention of waiting until it's marked down (inference: been sitting there
for hours so they're practically giving it away.)  I want my food to be
fresh.  Buffets, in general, are a turn-off.  Food sitting out on steam
tables for who knows how long.  No thanks!
I have posted before about the Mandarin Chinese buffet that has a number
of places in southern Ontario. They have a really wide selection of
foods, including pizza
Cultural appropriation!
Michael Trew
2021-11-21 23:17:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Michael Trew
Post by jmcquown
Frozen shrimp is available year round in different sizes, peeled, not
peeled, etc. regardless of the season. It's not something I go out of
my way to look for. I happen to have a pound of it in the freezer and
this is one of a couple ideas for using it. Bowser is welcome to the
last of the Chinese buffet when they mark down crappy cheap food.
Jill
I love home cooking, and that's my preference. Don't knock an
occasional Chinese buffet though! Most of that spread that I
occasionally get a craving for is too much of a hassle to do at home.
I wasn't really knocking the idea of a Chinese buffet, merely bowsers'
mention of waiting until it's marked down (inference: been sitting there
for hours so they're practically giving it away.) I want my food to be
fresh. Buffets, in general, are a turn-off. Food sitting out on steam
tables for who knows how long. No thanks!
Jill
True. On the rare occasion that I go, I typically only go when they
first open. Fresh food, that has far less of a chance of being
"touched" as Greg has cautioned.
Bruce
2021-11-21 23:25:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 18:17:42 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by jmcquown
I wasn't really knocking the idea of a Chinese buffet, merely bowsers'
mention of waiting until it's marked down (inference: been sitting there
for hours so they're practically giving it away.) I want my food to be
fresh. Buffets, in general, are a turn-off. Food sitting out on steam
tables for who knows how long. No thanks!
Jill
True. On the rare occasion that I go, I typically only go when they
first open. Fresh food, that has far less of a chance of being
"touched" as Greg has cautioned.
Greg's an expert on "touched". In the head.
Dave Smith
2021-11-22 00:59:22 UTC
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There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see there is one
in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this area,
other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby college
and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
Bruce
2021-11-22 03:04:47 UTC
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On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 19:59:22 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see there is one
in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this area,
other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby college
and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
But that's where your Chinese community is! Running those restaurants!
Leonard Blaisdell
2021-11-22 07:29:04 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this area,
other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby college
and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
It's called spycraft. Wait for it...
dsi1
2021-11-22 09:51:29 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area. I see there is one
in Beaufort. Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this area,
other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby college
and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
That's like the Chinese in Mexico. There doesn't seem to be Chinese in Mexico Chinatown. Where the heck are they?


Hank Rogers
2021-11-22 20:01:50 UTC
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 01:51:29 -0800 (PST), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area. I see there is one
in Beaufort. Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this area,
other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby college
and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
That's like the Chinese in Mexico. There doesn't seem to be Chinese in Mexico Chinatown. Where the heck are they?
http://youtu.be/N5Mp6EF5-jQ
There are a lot of Chinese communities in Central America. One of the
wealthiest families in Belize is Chinese, they are mushroom farmers.
One would never know they have million$, they all dress in schmatahs,
and travel by wrecked bicycles.
My wife's father knew them, he would always warn us when we went to a
Chinese eatery to only order the shrimp dishes so we could see what we
were eating, other meats would be dog, cat, or gibnut. Gibnut is a
giant jungle rat. Belize used to be British Hondurus, when the Queen
of England visited they fed her a special meal of gibnut. When I
visted they would always ask if I wanted gibnut in my fly lice, gibnut
cost extra... no thank you, shrimp was fine.
When my Father in law was young he was the star soccer player of
Belize. When I visited I mostly ate fruit and vegetables... and of
course I relished Belizean rum, probably the best on the planet. The
only better meat were the tasty Belizean women. Belizean women have
the best sculptered asses there are.
That's due to all the exercise they get while working in the donkey
shows, Popeye.
jmcquown
2021-11-23 02:21:33 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see there is
one in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this area,
other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby college
and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
Hmmmm, I suppose if there is a large number of Chinese students the
restaurants make sense. Totally different situation down here.

Jill
Dave Smith
2021-11-23 02:44:06 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see there is
one in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this
area, other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby
college and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
Hmmmm, I suppose if there is a large number of Chinese students the
restaurants make sense.  Totally different situation down here.
The Chinese students are a relatively new phenomenon. In the city with
the college with a lot of them there had always been a number of Chinese
restaurants. All but one of them are still in business. Since the influx
of students there had been a couple Chinese buffets that opened up
within walking distance of the college. I had been in them a couple
times and never notice a lot of young Chinese customers. Both of those
have gone under. In the next city over with a University there is the
some old Chinese restaurants that have been around for 50 years or more,
though one then recently closed when the owner decided to retire, and he
was in his 80s.

Meanwhile, there have been all kinds of other ethnic restaurants that
have opened up, like Thai, Vietnamese and and Indian, but few Chinese.
Bruce
2021-11-23 03:38:07 UTC
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:44:06 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by jmcquown
Hmmmm, I suppose if there is a large number of Chinese students the
restaurants make sense.  Totally different situation down here.
The Chinese students are a relatively new phenomenon. In the city with
the college with a lot of them there had always been a number of Chinese
restaurants. All but one of them are still in business. Since the influx
of students there had been a couple Chinese buffets that opened up
within walking distance of the college. I had been in them a couple
times and never notice a lot of young Chinese customers. Both of those
have gone under. In the next city over with a University there is the
some old Chinese restaurants that have been around for 50 years or more,
though one then recently closed when the owner decided to retire, and he
was in his 80s.
Meanwhile, there have been all kinds of other ethnic restaurants that
have opened up, like Thai, Vietnamese and and Indian, but few Chinese.
Keep us posted, Dave.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-23 04:15:02 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:44:06 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by jmcquown
Hmmmm, I suppose if there is a large number of Chinese students the
restaurants make sense.  Totally different situation down here.
The Chinese students are a relatively new phenomenon. In the city with
the college with a lot of them there had always been a number of Chinese
restaurants. All but one of them are still in business. Since the influx
of students there had been a couple Chinese buffets that opened up
within walking distance of the college. I had been in them a couple
times and never notice a lot of young Chinese customers. Both of those
have gone under. In the next city over with a University there is the
some old Chinese restaurants that have been around for 50 years or more,
though one then recently closed when the owner decided to retire, and he
was in his 80s.
Meanwhile, there have been all kinds of other ethnic restaurants that
have opened up, like Thai, Vietnamese and and Indian, but few Chinese.
Keep us posted, Dave.
I'll try to get dave to hike his leg for you, master.
Don Maximo
2021-11-23 07:23:04 UTC
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Dave Smith
2021-11-22 00:59:27 UTC
Reply
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There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see there is one
in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this area,
other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby college
and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
jmcquown
2021-11-22 21:18:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see there is
one in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this area,
other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby college
and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
Hey, Dave, how come you're quoting me but leaving in Michael's name in
the attributions?

Jill
Dave Smith
2021-11-22 22:52:35 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see there is
one in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this
area, other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby
college and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
Hey, Dave, how come you're quoting me but leaving in Michael's name in
the attributions?
Lazy trimming ;-)
Hank Rogers
2021-11-22 23:05:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by jmcquown
Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see
there is one in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The
Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in
this area, other than the large number of Chinese students at
the nearby college and university, but there are a lot of
Chinese restaurants
Hey, Dave, how come you're quoting me but leaving in Michael's
name in the attributions?
Lazy trimming ;-)
Check your lawn. She probably dumped trash on it.
jmcquown
2021-11-22 23:18:01 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dave Smith
Post by jmcquown
Post by Dave Smith
There is a dearth of Chinese restaurants in my area.  I see there is
one in Beaufort.  Here's an interesting review: "The Spare Ribs ??
It is curious that there is basically no Chinese community in this
area, other than the large number of Chinese students at the nearby
college and university, but there are a lot of Chinese restaurants
Hey, Dave, how come you're quoting me but leaving in Michael's name in
the attributions?
Lazy trimming ;-)
I'm not upset about it but I noticed in a couple of other replies to me
that included Michael. I wouldn't want the trim-happy trollers to get
all confoozled. ;)

Jill
Bruce
2021-11-22 23:22:06 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by Dave Smith
Post by jmcquown
Hey, Dave, how come you're quoting me but leaving in Michael's name in
the attributions?
Lazy trimming ;-)
I'm not upset about it but I noticed in a couple of other replies to me
that included Michael. I wouldn't want the trim-happy trollers to get
all confoozled. ;)
After all these years, Dave Smith still can't quote correctly. Happens
all the time.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-22 23:46:32 UTC
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Post by Bruce
Post by jmcquown
Post by Dave Smith
Post by jmcquown
Hey, Dave, how come you're quoting me but leaving in Michael's name in
the attributions?
Lazy trimming ;-)
I'm not upset about it but I noticed in a couple of other replies to me
that included Michael. I wouldn't want the trim-happy trollers to get
all confoozled. ;)
After all these years, Dave Smith still can't quote correctly. Happens
all the time.
Why not start forging dave smith posts again, master?

You did it before, vigorously, and there is nothing to stop you
from doing it again?

Are you fearful that he will fly to australia with a steamer trunk
full of trash?
US Janet
2021-11-19 00:54:26 UTC
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Post by i***@webtv.net
Thanks for posting this. I'm saving it. I have a pound of shrimp in
the freezer that was part of the "monthly special" from the local meat
market at the end of September. I've been wondering what to do with it.
I had thought perhaps marinating it (hadn't thought much about the
marinade), threading it on soaked wooden skewers, cooked quickly on the
grill. Shrimp cooks so fast it's probably not worth bothering with the
[charcoal] grill, though.
Jill
If you want, try this for shrimp. I've made it a few times and it is always
a hit.
Spicy Shrimp
1 pound peeled and deveined shrimp
4 cloves of minced garlic (micro plane zester does a great job on this)
1/4 cup lemon juice (usually the yield of 1 lemon)
2 teaspoons lemon pepper
4 teaspoons seafood seasoning such as Old Bay
2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce
1/2 cup of vegetable oil
Whisk all together and pour over cleaned shrimp and marinate for at
least 30 minutes. Half of the sauce can be reserved to brush on the
shrimp while grilling if desired. This also can be quickly prepared in
a skillet on the stove. Either way gives great results and a grill
skillet can used if you don't want to skewer your shrimp for the grill.
thanks. It sounds quick and easy. I like quick and easy these days.
Janet US
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-20 14:10:44 UTC
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Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
I think you've started a trend. We're having my rendition of this dish
tonight for supper.

Cindy Hamilton
jmcquown
2021-11-20 14:37:42 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by US Janet
Quick and easy and tasty.
1/3 cup butter, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced (or one tablespoon)
1 3/4 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined, tails intact
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Juice of half a lemon or more if desired
2 tablespoons water
Fresh chopped parsley to garnish
Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add
the garlic and cook about 1 minute.
Fry shrimp and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 2 minutes on one
side, stirring occasionally. Flip shrimp and cook 2 minutes longer or
until just turning pink
Add remaining butter, lemon juice and water. Cook,stirring, until
butter melts and shrimp are cooked through (do not overcook them)
Remove from heat, taste, adjust lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed
Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve over rice or pasta.
This was our dinner tonight. My husband ate it all without talking
and then said it was good.
I really like shrimp and this was a simple way to prepare them.
For me, I would add more lemon juice.
Janet US
I think you've started a trend. We're having my rendition of this dish
tonight for supper.
Cindy Hamilton
Quite possibly! I'm vacillating between thawing out the pound of shrimp
or a couple of chicken breast halves. The shrimp may win. :)

Jill
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