Discussion:
Vintage 1950s Recipes - Day 35: Zweibach Pudding
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Default User
2021-10-12 23:21:19 UTC
Permalink
If you didn't see it, an explanation for what I'm doing can be found
here:

Vintage 1950s Recipes - Overview
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/VCOk6Jy4mrc/m/2YqGehvSAA
AJ>

Zweibach Pudding

1 pkg. zweibach, rolled fine or Holland Rusk may be used.
1/2 c. melted butter
1/2 c. sugar
1 c. coconut
Save 1/2 c. crumbs. Mix rest of ingredients. Press into baking pan.
Bake about 10 minutes.
4 egg yolks, beaten
4 c. milk
3/4 c. sugar
3 T. cornstarch
1 t. vanilla
4 egg whites
4 T. sugar

Make a custard of yolks, milk, sugar, cornstarch, cooked until thick.
Add vanilla. Pour over first mixture. Beat whites with sugar until
stiff. Spread over custard. Spread the 1/2 c. crumbs over whites. Bake
until brown, about 10 minutes. Chopped nuts may added (sic) to crumbs
before baking. Serve with whipped cream.


I did not know what "zweibach" was (it seems to be spelled "zwieback"
usually). The only time I had heard of it before was in an episode of
M*A*S*H where Radar mentioned dunking zwieback in Bosco. I assumed from
that it was a type of plain cookie. However, it is sweet bread that has
been sliced and toasted until hard.


Look for another recipe tomorrow!


Brian
Mike Duffy
2021-10-12 23:25:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
jmcquown
2021-10-12 23:55:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.

Jill
Graham
2021-10-13 00:49:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Jill
Well, what do you think "biscuit" really means?
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-13 01:01:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by jmcquown
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Jill
Well, what do you think "biscuit" really means?
Now you're going too far :)
jmcquown
2021-10-13 01:15:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by jmcquown
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Jill
Well, what do you think "biscuit" really means?
All I know is I don't want to cook with teething cookies/biscuits.

Jill
Default User
2021-10-13 04:50:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
All I know is I don't want to cook with teething cookies/biscuits.
I don't think you understand what it is. It's like a sweeter Melba
toast.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zwieback


Brian
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-13 14:21:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Default User
Post by jmcquown
All I know is I don't want to cook with teething cookies/biscuits.
I don't think you understand what it is. It's like a sweeter Melba
toast.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zwieback
There is a reason socialism has never succeeded: It runs directly counter to human nature. Socialist regimes either collapse or survive only by becoming less socialist; the more a country embraces economic freedom and free markets, the more prosperous it becomes. Economic freedom is the antidote to socialism, and human nature yearns for it – because it recognizes individuals, respects them and endows them with a great deal of responsibility to take charge of their own lives and lift one another up.
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-13 00:49:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Me mum gave it to me to suck on at an early age - and by the age of five
I'd "graduated" to sucking me dad's long uncut Dutch cock!

He also used that big cock of his to "plug" dykes ;)

lol
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-13 01:12:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Jill
I remember they were given to my nieces and nephews when they
were teething.
Gary
2021-10-13 12:25:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Jill
I remember they were given to my nieces and nephews when they
were teething.
"Milk Bone" works well for teething. The babies don't know it's dog treats.
Michael Trew
2021-10-13 04:43:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Jill
Oh no, are we getting into "biscuits" again? Lol
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-13 04:48:32 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 00:43:46 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by jmcquown
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Jill
Oh no, are we getting into "biscuits" again? Lol
Do you mean a dry cookie?
Hank Rogers
2021-10-13 21:45:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 00:43:46 -0400, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by jmcquown
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Default User
I did not know what "zweibach" was
[...] spelled "zwieback" usually
German for 'twice baked'. Technically, so is what we call 'toast'.
Despite the German meaning, I remember Zwieback as being teething
biscuits for babies.
Jill
Oh no, are we getting into "biscuits" again? Lol
Do you mean a dry cookie?
So dry your farts blow dust.
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-12 23:29:55 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 12 Oct 2021 23:21:19 -0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
If you didn't see it, an explanation for what I'm doing can be found
Vintage 1950s Recipes - Overview
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/VCOk6Jy4mrc/m/2YqGehvSAA
AJ>
Zweibach Pudding
1 pkg. zweibach, rolled fine or Holland Rusk may be used.
1/2 c. melted butter
1/2 c. sugar
1 c. coconut
Save 1/2 c. crumbs. Mix rest of ingredients. Press into baking pan.
Bake about 10 minutes.
4 egg yolks, beaten
4 c. milk
3/4 c. sugar
3 T. cornstarch
1 t. vanilla
4 egg whites
4 T. sugar
Make a custard of yolks, milk, sugar, cornstarch, cooked until thick.
Add vanilla. Pour over first mixture. Beat whites with sugar until
stiff. Spread over custard. Spread the 1/2 c. crumbs over whites. Bake
until brown, about 10 minutes. Chopped nuts may added (sic) to crumbs
before baking. Serve with whipped cream.
I did not know what "zweibach" was
I remember zweibach, a hard very dry bisquit given to young children
to shut them up.
https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/10139/zwieback/

(it seems to be spelled "zwieback"
Post by Default User
usually). The only time I had heard of it before was in an episode of
M*A*S*H where Radar mentioned dunking zwieback in Bosco. I assumed from
that it was a type of plain cookie. However, it is sweet bread that has
been sliced and toasted until hard.
Look for another recipe tomorrow!
Brian
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-12 23:54:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
I remember zweibach, a hard very dry bisquit given to young children
to shut them up.
https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/10139/zwieback/
You remember "zweibach" and give a link to "zwieback". One can tell
you're a very educated man, since you cover all your bases.
bruce bowser
2021-10-13 22:36:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
Post by Sheldon Martin
I remember zweibach, a hard very dry bisquit given to young children
to shut them up.
https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/10139/zwieback/
You remember "zweibach" and give a link to "zwieback". One can tell
you're a very educated man, since you cover all your bases.
How do you say that in dutch? geleerd? afgestudeerd? in levensvaardigheden?
Bruce 0.77 Beta
2021-10-13 22:58:41 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 13 Oct 2021 15:36:05 -0700 (PDT), bruce bowser
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Bruce 0.77 Beta
Post by Sheldon Martin
I remember zweibach, a hard very dry bisquit given to young children
to shut them up.
https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/10139/zwieback/
You remember "zweibach" and give a link to "zwieback". One can tell
you're a very educated man, since you cover all your bases.
How do you say that in dutch? geleerd? afgestudeerd? in levensvaardigheden?
Hoog opgeleid, (af)gestudeerd, ontwikkeld, geleerd...

songbird
2021-10-13 12:14:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Default User
If you didn't see it, an explanation for what I'm doing can be found
Vintage 1950s Recipes - Overview
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/VCOk6Jy4mrc/m/2YqGehvSAA
AJ>
Zweibach Pudding
1 pkg. zweibach, rolled fine or Holland Rusk may be used.
1/2 c. melted butter
1/2 c. sugar
1 c. coconut
Save 1/2 c. crumbs. Mix rest of ingredients. Press into baking pan.
Bake about 10 minutes.
4 egg yolks, beaten
4 c. milk
3/4 c. sugar
3 T. cornstarch
1 t. vanilla
4 egg whites
4 T. sugar
Make a custard of yolks, milk, sugar, cornstarch, cooked until thick.
Add vanilla. Pour over first mixture. Beat whites with sugar until
stiff. Spread over custard. Spread the 1/2 c. crumbs over whites. Bake
until brown, about 10 minutes. Chopped nuts may added (sic) to crumbs
before baking. Serve with whipped cream.
I did not know what "zweibach" was (it seems to be spelled "zwieback"
usually). The only time I had heard of it before was in an episode of
M*A*S*H where Radar mentioned dunking zwieback in Bosco. I assumed from
that it was a type of plain cookie. However, it is sweet bread that has
been sliced and toasted until hard.
Look for another recipe tomorrow!
use some lady fingers and break up some almond toffee bars.

whipped cream instead of egg whites. no bake version.


songbird
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