Discussion:
Black Friday purchase
(too old to reply)
Andy
2004-11-27 09:11:19 UTC
Permalink
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.

$40.00

PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)

Andy
Bob (this one)
2004-11-27 09:41:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.
$40.00
PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>

I always think of it as "Green Friday."

Pastorio
Andy
2004-11-27 10:36:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Andy
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.
$40.00
PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I always think of it as "Green Friday."
Pastorio
Pastorio,

I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".

Andy
jmcquown
2004-11-27 12:43:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Andy
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.
$40.00
PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I always think of it as "Green Friday."
Pastorio
Pastorio,
I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".
Andy
Exactly. The day after Thanksgiving in the USA is known for being the
busiest shopping day of the year, so for retailers it often puts them "in
the black" financially speaking.

Jill
Bob (this one)
2004-11-27 13:31:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Andy
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Andy
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.
$40.00
PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I always think of it as "Green Friday."
Pastorio
Pastorio,
I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".
Andy
Exactly. The day after Thanksgiving in the USA is known for being the
busiest shopping day of the year, so for retailers it often puts them "in
the black" financially speaking.
I dunno about that. The merchants I'm talking about didn't use those
uptown financial images the rest of the time. These aren't laptop/PDA
types; they're in our rural Mennonite markets. They were more likely
making reference to having to work harder on that day than any other.

I'm going to Costco today to pick up my new glasses and do a lot of
impulse purchasing. Stop at the Green Valley Book Fair (google it,
it'll blow you away) to ostensibly buy X-mas gifts but might
accidentally buy myself some books.

I've actually already bought gifts for several people. I'm stunned. So
early...

Pastorio
skoonj
2004-11-27 21:40:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Andy
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Andy
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.
$40.00
PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I always think of it as "Green Friday."
Pastorio
Pastorio,
I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".
Andy
Exactly. The day after Thanksgiving in the USA is known for being the
busiest shopping day of the year, so for retailers it often puts them "in
the black" financially speaking.
Jill
It isn't really the busiest shopping day of the year, though. Usually
December 23rd is, or the Saturday right before Chirstmas Day.

-T
sf
2004-11-27 21:48:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
I imagine it's a financial reference, "being in the black" as opposed
to "being in the red".
Black isn't always good if you're talking about the stock
market.

http://mutualfunds.about.com/cs/1929marketcrash/a/black_tuesday.htm

sf
Practice safe eating - always use condiments
Julia Altshuler
2004-11-27 13:26:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob (this one)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved for
disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.


I'm interested in how sales the day after Thanksgiving work in the food
business. In the wine and cheese shop where I work, the day before
Thanksgiving was busy. We were swamped. People came in to buy large
quantities of good cheese and nice bottles of wine to serve on
Thanksgiving day. If they weren't serving Thanksgiving dinner, they
still bought both to take with them wherever they were going. The day
after Thanksgiving was dead. My boss was thinking that it would be a
good day because the day after Thanksgiving is famous for people going
out to buy Xmas gifts, and wine makes a nice gift, but instead, we were
so slow that my co-worker and I cleaned and organized 3 refrigerators.
(That's something I've been wanting to do for ages and was delighted to
have the chance. I love putting everything away where *I* think it
belongs.)


I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy gifts.
Has that been the experience of the people on this list? If that
theory is correct, yesterday we learned that the wine and cheese shop
where I work is looked at more as a restaurant-food business than a
retail-food business.


--Lia
jmcquown
2004-11-27 13:52:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Julia Altshuler
Post by Bob (this one)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.
I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy gifts.
--Lia
I don't know about your business; you are probably correct about the
leftovers! I recall one Thanksgiving DAY when it was mandatory everyone
show up for work at the restaurant. (I also recall one bartender who
protested loudly he had plans and would not be there, regardless of the
schedule. He was honestly surprised when he was fired the next day for
failing to report.)

Management expected huge crowds of people who didn't want to cook. Planned
a special menu with turkey, dressing, gravy, etc. I was the hostess that
day and I and the servers just stood around, bored to tears. You can only
clean tables so many times. The only folks who had any business were the
bartenders (ha! The guy should have come to work!) and the cocktail
waitresses. I think a couple of people came in to buy caramel pies on their
way to someones dinner. And I seem to recall being vaguely thrilled when I
seated a party of six. That must have been the longest 8 hours of my life.

On the other hand, when I worked retail for a large retailer selling
clothing I ran my a** off the day after Thanksgiving. A person would have
to be nuts to go to a Mall on that day.

BTW, Lia, I did buy a bottle of wine yesterday as a gift. You are right;
the shop was not busy. Go figure.

Jill
sf
2004-11-27 22:02:39 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 07:52:56 -0600, "jmcquown"
Post by jmcquown
Management expected huge crowds of people who didn't want to cook. Planned
a special menu with turkey, dressing, gravy, etc. I was the hostess that
day and I and the servers just stood around, bored to tears. You can only
clean tables so many times. The only folks who had any business were the
bartenders (ha! The guy should have come to work!) and the cocktail
waitresses. I think a couple of people came in to buy caramel pies on their
way to someones dinner. And I seem to recall being vaguely thrilled when I
seated a party of six. That must have been the longest 8 hours of my life.
I've only been to a restaurant once or twice on Thanksgiving
Day. All the restaurants had a booming business and
reservations were necessary.

sf
Practice safe eating - always use condiments
Bob (this one)
2004-11-27 14:41:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Julia Altshuler
Post by Bob (this one)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.
I'm interested in how sales the day after Thanksgiving work in the food
business.
Short version: you can go bowling in most restaurants and not hit
anybody. The only ones that do any appreciable business are the ones
in the mall food courts and fast food operations near malls and other
strong shopping areas.

Pastorio
Post by Julia Altshuler
In the wine and cheese shop where I work, the day before
Thanksgiving was busy. We were swamped. People came in to buy large
quantities of good cheese and nice bottles of wine to serve on
Thanksgiving day. If they weren't serving Thanksgiving dinner, they
still bought both to take with them wherever they were going. The day
after Thanksgiving was dead. My boss was thinking that it would be a
good day because the day after Thanksgiving is famous for people going
out to buy Xmas gifts, and wine makes a nice gift, but instead, we were
so slow that my co-worker and I cleaned and organized 3 refrigerators.
(That's something I've been wanting to do for ages and was delighted to
have the chance. I love putting everything away where *I* think it
belongs.)
I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy gifts.
Has that been the experience of the people on this list? If that
theory is correct, yesterday we learned that the wine and cheese shop
where I work is looked at more as a restaurant-food business than a
retail-food business.
--Lia
HiTech RedNeck
2004-11-28 03:51:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Julia Altshuler
Post by Bob (this one)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
In this case, a "black" day has both one meaning and its opposite. So
Black Monday and Black Tuesday were economic disaster days in 1929 at
the beginning of the Depression, but the day after Thanksgiving is a
black day because sales are normally so good the retailers are back in
the black on their balance sheets.
I'm interested in how sales the day after Thanksgiving work in the food
business.
Short version: you can go bowling in most restaurants and not hit
anybody. The only ones that do any appreciable business are the ones
in the mall food courts and fast food operations near malls and other
strong shopping areas.
Pastorio
After a kitchen sink drain disaster on Thursday morning, that neither
plunger nor drain auger could fix, made home cooking out of the question (I
didn't really feel like doing dishes in the bathtub), I met with a friend at
an Old Country Buffet. I thought, since it was 2 PM, the business would be
slack. It wasn't; there was a queue clear back to the door because every
table was filled. Fortunately my friend had gotten in earlier and saved a
place in line for me :-)

On Friday I bought a Clog Buster (a torpedo shaped black rubber thing that
goes on the end of a garden hose and is fed down the drain pipe, where it
swells to fill the pipe and then blasts water down the pipe) and that
cleared the clog. Wish I'd had one on Thursday morning....
Sheryl Rosen
2004-11-27 15:03:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Julia Altshuler
I guess the day after Thanksgiving is bound to be awful for people in
the restaurant-food business since people have leftovers in the house
but good for people in the retail-food business since people buy gifts.
Has that been the experience of the people on this list? If that
theory is correct, yesterday we learned that the wine and cheese shop
where I work is looked at more as a restaurant-food business than a
retail-food business.
--Lia
I know for me, wine and gourmet food items are gifts that I'm most likely to
pick up more at the last minute. Especially if the stores are not located
in malls. That's because they are easy gifts to pick up.

I went shopping yesterday....I went to 2 stores. Left my house at 6:30, was
at the mall 10 minutes later. Spent a little more than 2 hours shopping,
then was off to Kohl's for the rest of my list. The lines at the mall
department store were not bad at all, maybe 3-4 deep. And the shopping was
easy, it wasn't all that crowded. I didn't venture out into the mall, I
just went into the one store I needed and left via the same door I came in.

Kohl's was another story entirely! Crowded....merchandise everywhere,
lines...you name it. Of course, it was only 9:30 and the store had been open
for 4 hours!!!!! Still, I was able to complete my list, except for a small
item for my BIL and something for my friend's parents. I also need a few
more gift boxes and a couple skeins of yarn to complete some crocheted gifts
I'm making, so I can probably finish up my list at Walmart.

Oh, and b/c Kohl's gave out $10 gift certificates good for next week with
every $50 you spent, I can go back next week to pick up a couple serving
pieces for my Chanukah party. :-)
Nancy Young
2004-11-27 17:38:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheryl Rosen
I went shopping yesterday....I went to 2 stores. Left my house at 6:30,
AM???
Post by Sheryl Rosen
was
at the mall 10 minutes later. Spent a little more than 2 hours shopping,
then was off to Kohl's for the rest of my list. The lines at the mall
department store were not bad at all, maybe 3-4 deep. And the shopping was
easy, it wasn't all that crowded. I didn't venture out into the mall, I
just went into the one store I needed and left via the same door I came in.
Kohl's was another story entirely! Crowded....merchandise everywhere,
lines...you name it. Of course, it was only 9:30 and the store had been open
for 4 hours!!!!! Still, I was able to complete my list, except for a small
item for my BIL and something for my friend's parents. I also need a few
more gift boxes and a couple skeins of yarn to complete some crocheted gifts
I'm making, so I can probably finish up my list at Walmart.
I give you credit, sounds like you're just about done. Congratulations.

nancy
Steve Calvin
2004-11-27 18:48:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sheryl Rosen
I went shopping yesterday....I went to 2 stores. Left my house at 6:30,
AM???
I don't doubt it. The news showed lines outside some stores that had
to be a quarter of a mile long... at FOUR A-flippin-M! Needless to
say, I wasn't in one!
--
Steve

Who was the first person to say, "See that chicken there... I'm gonna
eat the next thing that comes outta it's ass?"
Nancy Young
2004-11-27 18:55:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Calvin
Post by Sheryl Rosen
I went shopping yesterday....I went to 2 stores. Left my house at 6:30,
AM???
I don't doubt it. The news showed lines outside some stores that had
to be a quarter of a mile long... at FOUR A-flippin-M! Needless to
say, I wasn't in one!
There is *nothing* I can think of that could induce me to go stand in
line like that. Don't anyone get me wrong, I know they have good
sales and it's often a family tradition, but I am far too lazy to
go to those lengths. I'm just not a shopper. I go at dinnertime
closer to Christmas and it's not bad and everything is marked down.
45 minutes, I'm done. Then, I don't buy for all but one person.

nancy
Dave Smith
2004-11-27 20:34:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nancy Young
There is *nothing* I can think of that could induce me to go stand in
line like that. Don't anyone get me wrong, I know they have good
sales and it's often a family tradition, but I am far too lazy to
go to those lengths. I'm just not a shopper. I go at dinnertime
closer to Christmas and it's not bad and everything is marked down.
45 minutes, I'm done. Then, I don't buy for all but one person.
Damn it. It's the over commercialization of another traditional holiday. I
hate it. It's bad enough that Christmas has been turned into an exercise in
commercial and material indulgence. My whole family used to get together every
year for Christmas Day at my parent's house. and kept it up for a few years
after my father died. Two of my brother's live within 12 miles of my mother's
house and one lives about 200 miles away. He was the only who had a long drive,
so he and his family would stay for a day or two with my parents. That is no
longer possible. She works in retail. She works her butt off for the 2-3 weeks
leading up to Christmas, and then has to stay late on Christmas Eve to get
ready for the Boxing Day sales, which also entail getting there early in the
morning of the 26th. I can understand why she doesn't have the time or energy
to drive 3 hours each way.

It's amazing that so many people will run out on a holiday to scoop up all that
merchandise that is left over from Christmas. If the stores stayed closed for
the extra day to celebrate a special family holiday they could still sell all
that stuff the next day. The only reason they have to open that day is because
others are. It is unfortunate.
sd
2004-11-27 23:13:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
It's amazing that so many people will run out on a holiday to scoop up all that
merchandise that is left over from Christmas. If the stores stayed closed for
the extra day to celebrate a special family holiday they could still sell all
that stuff the next day. The only reason they have to open that day is because
others are. It is unfortunate.
And they're open because people will show up to buy. I'm not sure that
people really think it through -- it's certainly not much of a
Thanksgiving for the people who had to show up at Kohl's before 5 to
open the store at 5:30.

It's no different for Memorial Day and President's Day and the other
holidays which have become less about commemoration and more about
denomination (20s and 50s). Would American commerce really grind to a
halt if most stores stayed closed on holidays?

sd
Andy
2004-11-27 23:21:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by sd
It's no different for Memorial Day and President's Day and the other
holidays which have become less about commemoration and more about
denomination (20s and 50s). Would American commerce really grind to a
halt if most stores stayed closed on holidays?
sd
I was secretly hoping America would adopt siesta. That would help the
"extremely long lunch" crowd. ;)

Andy
Tony P.
2004-11-28 00:04:17 UTC
Permalink
In article <zMydnXOBmdOJkTTcRVn-***@giganews.com>, ***@nowhere.com
says...
Post by Andy
Post by sd
It's no different for Memorial Day and President's Day and the other
holidays which have become less about commemoration and more about
denomination (20s and 50s). Would American commerce really grind to a
halt if most stores stayed closed on holidays?
sd
I was secretly hoping America would adopt siesta. That would help the
"extremely long lunch" crowd. ;)
That would be an absolute boon but we'll never see it in the U.S. It's
that Protestant work ethic that we inherited from the founders.

We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases that they couldn't abide in Merry Old England.
Autralia got the criminals, the States got the Jesus freaks.
Wayne Boatwright
2004-11-28 00:07:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony P.
We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases that they couldn't abide in Merry Old England.
Autralia got the criminals, the States got the Jesus freaks.
Amen! <g>
--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
PENMART01
2004-11-28 00:50:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony P.
We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases
"religious nutcases"... ain't that an oxymoron... ALL those involved with
religion, any religion, are nutcases.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
Julian9EHP
2004-11-28 01:10:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by PENMART01
"religious nutcases"... ain't that an oxymoron... ALL those involved with
religion, any religion, are nutcases.
Then you'd better not get sick -- you might have to go to a hospital. The
great majority of hospitals were started by religious people.


E. P.
Ken Davey
2004-11-28 01:59:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Julian9EHP
Post by PENMART01
"religious nutcases"... ain't that an oxymoron... ALL those involved
with religion, any religion, are nutcases.
Then you'd better not get sick -- you might have to go to a hospital.
The great majority of hospitals were started by religious people.
E. P.
The great majority of hospitals were not started by religious people.
They sprang out of the desire by 'caring' people to help their fellow man.
Religion was NOT the reason.
If what you said was really the case history would be replete with horror
stories of refusal to admit without evidence of religious affiliation. Now
if you want to talk about racial descrimination this is a good place to
start.
Ken.
--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com
Dave Smith
2004-11-28 02:24:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Davey
The great majority of hospitals were not started by religious people.
They sprang out of the desire by 'caring' people to help their fellow man.
Religion was NOT the reason.
If what you said was really the case history would be replete with horror
stories of refusal to admit without evidence of religious affiliation. Now
if you want to talk about racial descrimination this is a good place to
start.
If you can twist reality around enough I suppose it could be said that a lot
of hospitals were founded by the church. After all, the church had an
incredible amount of influence in days gone by, and few projects were carried
out without its consent. So if we interpret the approval to well meaning
groups to build hospitals we can say that the church was responsible for them
being established.
Gregory Morrow
2004-11-28 13:36:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Ken Davey
The great majority of hospitals were not started by religious people.
They sprang out of the desire by 'caring' people to help their fellow man.
Religion was NOT the reason.
If what you said was really the case history would be replete with horror
stories of refusal to admit without evidence of religious affiliation. Now
if you want to talk about racial descrimination this is a good place to
start.
If you can twist reality around enough I suppose it could be said that a lot
of hospitals were founded by the church. After all, the church had an
incredible amount of influence in days gone by, and few projects were carried
out without its consent. So if we interpret the approval to well meaning
groups to build hospitals we can say that the church was responsible for them
being established.
That's because not so long ago hospitals were places where one went to die,
not to necessarily get well, they were in fact virtual charnel
houses...perhaps this is a factor as to why churches were so active in
setting up hospitals.

A present - day example of such a place would be "Mother" Theresa's (an evil
EVIL old bag and SCUMBAG con artist if there was one) filthy medieval
facilities in India, where people in great pain are denied basic painkillers
(including aspirin) and are told to "pray to the Lord" for
"salvation"...'course when Evil Theresa needed medical care her rich and
shady friends flew her to clinics in Switzerland or wherever via private
jet...google "Missionary Position" and "Christopher Hitchens" to see for
yerselves...
--
Best
Greg
Derek Lyons
2004-11-28 06:28:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Davey
Post by Julian9EHP
Then you'd better not get sick -- you might have to go to a hospital.
The great majority of hospitals were started by religious people.
The great majority of hospitals were not started by religious people.
They sprang out of the desire by 'caring' people to help their fellow man.
Religion was NOT the reason.
If what you said was really the case history would be replete with horror
stories of refusal to admit without evidence of religious affiliation.
Actually what he said *is* in fact the case. A great number of
hospitals (both in the US and abroad) do in fact spring from religious
institutions/foundations.

And in fact, almost none of them were in the habit of turning away
people based on religious affiliation.
Post by Ken Davey
if you want to talk about racial descrimination this is a good place to
start.
Ignorant bigotry like your is how such discrimination comes to be, and
comes to flourish.

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.

-Resolved: To be more temperate in my postings.
Oct 5th, 2004 JDL
Ken Davey
2004-11-28 01:45:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by PENMART01
Post by Tony P.
We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases
"religious nutcases"... ain't that an oxymoron... ALL those involved
with religion, any religion, are nutcases.
On that we agree!!
Ken.
--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com
Julian9EHP
2004-11-28 02:05:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Davey
Post by PENMART01
Post by Tony P.
We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases
"religious nutcases"... ain't that an oxymoron... ALL those involved
with religion, any religion, are nutcases.
On that we agree!!
Ken.
And all of the religious people in the world are insulted by Ken.

They all are tremendously upset. :p


E. P.
Ken Davey
2004-11-28 02:09:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Julian9EHP
Post by Ken Davey
Post by PENMART01
Post by Tony P.
We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases
"religious nutcases"... ain't that an oxymoron... ALL those involved
with religion, any religion, are nutcases.
On that we agree!!
Ken.
And all of the religious people in the world are insulted by Ken.
They all are tremendously upset. :p
E. P.
And this is a good thing.(BG)
Ken.
--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com
Zywicki
2004-11-29 17:15:58 UTC
Permalink
Cue one of the best recent Movie Quotes, from Goldmember:

"There are two things in this world I hate; people who are inolerant of
others' cultures, and the Dutch."

Greg Zywicki
Tony P.
2004-11-28 15:15:54 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@mb-m13.aol.com>, penmart01
@aol.como says...
Post by PENMART01
Post by Tony P.
We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases
"religious nutcases"... ain't that an oxymoron... ALL those involved with
religion, any religion, are nutcases.
Some much more than others. But yes, it's something along the line of
referring to those who break the law and are caught as stupid criminals.
The 'stupid' is already implied.
Levelwave©
2004-12-01 01:46:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by PENMART01
"religious nutcases"... ain't that an oxymoron... ALL those involved with
religion, any religion, are nutcases.
No, that would be more like 'redundant' not an oxymoron.

~john
Dave Smith
2004-11-28 02:19:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony P.
That would be an absolute boon but we'll never see it in the U.S. It's
that Protestant work ethic that we inherited from the founders.
We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases that they couldn't abide in Merry Old England.
Autralia got the criminals, the States got the Jesus freaks.
It has long amazed me that we hear so much of the mythology about the US
being founded by those escaping religious persecution when some of the first
communities were established by religious sects who, rather than escaping
religious persecution, were more interested in establishing single faith
societies where they would be free to persecute. A large number of Europeans
who were escaping from religious persecution were people like the Palatine
Germans who were sent to America and given land by the British Crown.
Tony P.
2004-11-28 15:19:54 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@sympatico.ca>, ***@sympatico.ca
says...
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Tony P.
That would be an absolute boon but we'll never see it in the U.S. It's
that Protestant work ethic that we inherited from the founders.
We have to keep in mind that the original colonies were set up by
religious nutcases that they couldn't abide in Merry Old England.
Autralia got the criminals, the States got the Jesus freaks.
It has long amazed me that we hear so much of the mythology about the US
being founded by those escaping religious persecution when some of the first
communities were established by religious sects who, rather than escaping
religious persecution, were more interested in establishing single faith
societies where they would be free to persecute. A large number of Europeans
who were escaping from religious persecution were people like the Palatine
Germans who were sent to America and given land by the British Crown.
That might be colored by where I live. Apparently the religion practiced
by Roger Williams wasn't acceptable those in the Mass Bay colony. There
is a nice little park in the middle of Providence - the Roger Williams
Memorial. It is sited pretty much where his house was.

So he was persecuted and elected to go about 45 miles south and
establish his own state where religious freedom was what it was all
about. That could be a reason that Rhode Island contains the first
Baptist Church, and the first synagogue.
Dave Smith
2004-11-28 17:28:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony P.
That might be colored by where I live. Apparently the religion practiced
by Roger Williams wasn't acceptable those in the Mass Bay colony. There
is a nice little park in the middle of Providence - the Roger Williams
Memorial. It is sited pretty much where his house was.
Bear in mind that the Puritans who settled in Mass. were the same denomination who
revolted in England 40 years later because they feared that the king was showing
too much leniency toward Catholics. Once they killed the king and took over they
went after Catholics in a passion, especially in Ireland where they committed
atrocities that Irish Catholics still condemn the English for.
Derek Lyons
2004-11-29 01:29:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
It has long amazed me that we hear so much of the mythology about the US
being founded by those escaping religious persecution when some of the first
communities were established by religious sects who, rather than escaping
religious persecution, were more interested in establishing single faith
societies where they would be free to persecute.
The problem with this thesis is simple; The US was 'founded' by
several groups, with divergent religious opinions, from divergent
economic backgrounds, and with wildly varying levels of orthodoxy as
compared with the folks Back Home.

Puritan Massachusetts was very different from Anglican Virgina.

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.

-Resolved: To be more temperate in my postings.
Oct 5th, 2004 JDL
Tony P.
2004-11-28 00:02:16 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@sympatico.ca>, ***@sympatico.ca
says...
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Nancy Young
There is *nothing* I can think of that could induce me to go stand in
line like that. Don't anyone get me wrong, I know they have good
sales and it's often a family tradition, but I am far too lazy to
go to those lengths. I'm just not a shopper. I go at dinnertime
closer to Christmas and it's not bad and everything is marked down.
45 minutes, I'm done. Then, I don't buy for all but one person.
Damn it. It's the over commercialization of another traditional holiday. I
hate it. It's bad enough that Christmas has been turned into an exercise in
commercial and material indulgence. My whole family used to get together every
year for Christmas Day at my parent's house. and kept it up for a few years
after my father died. Two of my brother's live within 12 miles of my mother's
house and one lives about 200 miles away. He was the only who had a long drive,
so he and his family would stay for a day or two with my parents. That is no
longer possible. She works in retail. She works her butt off for the 2-3 weeks
leading up to Christmas, and then has to stay late on Christmas Eve to get
ready for the Boxing Day sales, which also entail getting there early in the
morning of the 26th. I can understand why she doesn't have the time or energy
to drive 3 hours each way.
Surfing through my RSS feeds this morning I came across an article in
Louisiana where someone had squirted what is more likely epoxy than
super glue into the door locks of a local strip mall.

I think we're going to start seeing the backlash against the crass
consumerism so rampant today.
Post by Dave Smith
It's amazing that so many people will run out on a holiday to scoop up all that
merchandise that is left over from Christmas. If the stores stayed closed for
the extra day to celebrate a special family holiday they could still sell all
that stuff the next day. The only reason they have to open that day is because
others are. It is unfortunate.
I haven't bought a single thing yet and I set a strict $200 each limit
on gifts the SO and I exchange. I refuse to drop more than $400
combined on any holiday.

Of course I can remember and have the pictures to show the wall of toys
behind me when I was a kid on one Christmas and I know it happened on
others. Thing is, my mom worked at a local retail outlet that gave steep
discounts to employees and so that is how I ended up with that wall. Had
they paid full retail I'd probably have gotten two or three toys.
s***@gmail.com
2004-12-01 20:01:22 UTC
Permalink
Don't forget to trade those unwanted gift cards at
http://www.cardavenue.com .
Cindy Fuller
2004-11-27 17:22:25 UTC
Permalink
In article <3g%pd.105480$***@attbi_s03>,
Julia Altshuler <***@comcast.net> wrote:

snip>
Post by Julia Altshuler
I'm interested in how sales the day after Thanksgiving work in the food
business. In the wine and cheese shop where I work, the day before
Thanksgiving was busy. We were swamped. People came in to buy large
quantities of good cheese and nice bottles of wine to serve on
Thanksgiving day. If they weren't serving Thanksgiving dinner, they
still bought both to take with them wherever they were going. The day
after Thanksgiving was dead. My boss was thinking that it would be a
good day because the day after Thanksgiving is famous for people going
out to buy Xmas gifts, and wine makes a nice gift, but instead, we were
so slow that my co-worker and I cleaned and organized 3 refrigerators.
(That's something I've been wanting to do for ages and was delighted to
have the chance. I love putting everything away where *I* think it
belongs.)
more snip

We went on our weekly shopping trip to Central Market yesterday. What a
nice change from the usual weekend chaos there. No long lines at the
meat counter or the checkout.

Cindy
--
C.J. Fuller

Delete the obvious to email me
Tony P.
2004-11-27 15:17:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Andy
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.
$40.00
PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I always think of it as "Green Friday."
It is an accounting term. Normal entries on balance sheets and other
financial statements are written in black or blue while negative entries
or those showing a loss are written in red.

Retail is in the red for most of the year, their best quarter for
revenue and profit being the fourth quarter where all the holidays are
clustered.
Bob (this one)
2004-11-27 16:02:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony P.
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Andy
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.
$40.00
PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I always think of it as "Green Friday."
It is an accounting term. Normal entries on balance sheets and other
financial statements are written in black or blue while negative entries
or those showing a loss are written in red.
I understand the accounting forms. I've run my own businesses since
the 70's.
Post by Tony P.
Retail is in the red for most of the year, their best quarter for
revenue and profit being the fourth quarter where all the holidays are
clustered.
I can't imagine being in a business that operates at a loss for any
significant part of the year. My restaurants were profitable from day
1 and stayed that way. Startup costs amortized across three years.
Everything (costed for materials, equipment and labor) on all menus
was profitable or it wasn't there.

I guess retail wouldn't be the business for me. I'd be nuts having to
count on a month to rescue an otherwise unprofitable year.

Pastorio
Nancy Howells
2004-11-27 18:56:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob (this one)
Post by Andy
Finally bought a multicooker. 12-qt. stockpot with pasta and steamer
inserts and glass lid w/vent.
$40.00
PITA to clean, imho. Oh well, always wanted one for some reason. ;)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I always think of it as "Green Friday."
Pastorio
I suspect it might mean the day that a number of businesses go into the
black, rather than the red, but what do I know?
--
Nancy Howells (don't forget to switch it, and replace the ;) to send mail).
sf
2004-11-27 21:46:53 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 04:41:31 -0500, "Bob (this one)"
Post by Bob (this one)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I've never heard the term before this year... I would have
thought it referenced some mafia style massacre, union clash
or stock market crash. Do they call it "black" because
stores open before the sun comes up?

The Christmas shopping season used to begin the day after
Thanksgiving, but now it starts in September - so I don't
understand the continuing mindset. Stores had the very same
things on sale the day/week before.

sf
Practice safe eating - always use condiments
Goomba38
2004-11-27 21:59:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by sf
On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 04:41:31 -0500, "Bob (this one)"
Post by Bob (this one)
I've never understood that "Black Friday" thing. When I was actively
selling my food products in farmers' markets, it was always about 10
times better than my next best day. Black Friday should be reserved
for disastrous occasions, not the ones that pay the bills. <G>
I've never heard the term before this year... I would have
thought it referenced some mafia style massacre, union clash
or stock market crash. Do they call it "black" because
stores open before the sun comes up?
I just heard why they call it "Black Friday" as it
is the day that should put a stores finances in
the black if it's a good sales day. It didn't make
sense to me before either.
Goomba
Gregory Morrow
2004-11-28 13:47:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Goomba38
I just heard why they call it "Black Friday" as it
is the day that should put a stores finances in
the black if it's a good sales day. It didn't make
sense to me before either.
Goomba
Well this is the first time I've ever heard the term (and I'm 50). It's
just another concept the media cooked up to catch folks' attention...

I don't understand why people would endure mob scenes to buy cheap stuff
that is available elsewhere and at other times...thank G-d for online
shopping and mail order...

I must confess I lucked out at Walgreen's on a "seven hour sale" of those
Hershey's giant candy bars @ two for a dollar, but I was in Wag's to buy
other things, not necessarily the cheapo chocolate...

I stopped at Radio Shaque to buy a mouse pad and there were people there
buying up those $19.95 DVD players (among other assorted junk). I remarked
to one buyer, "You'll be back when that DVD player breaks on ya in a few
weeks' or months' time...".
--
Best
Greg
Derek Lyons
2004-11-29 01:32:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gregory Morrow
I just heard why they call it "Black Friday" as it is the day that should
put a stores finances in the black if it's a good sales day. It didn't make
sense to me before either.
Well this is the first time I've ever heard the term (and I'm 50). It's
just another concept the media cooked up to catch folks' attention...
Then you've been hiding in a cellar. It's been a major retail concept
for twenty-thirty years and covered in the media for most of that
time.

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.

-Resolved: To be more temperate in my postings.
Oct 5th, 2004 JDL
sf
2004-11-29 06:02:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Lyons
Then you've been hiding in a cellar. It's been a major retail concept
for twenty-thirty years and covered in the media for most of that
time.
Major? Perhaps if you're in the business, but certainly not
for ordinary shoppers. That term was never on my radar
screen with a meaning anywhere close to retail until this
thread.

sf
Practice safe eating - always use condiments
Derek Lyons
2004-11-29 08:19:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by sf
Post by Derek Lyons
Then you've been hiding in a cellar. It's been a major retail concept
for twenty-thirty years and covered in the media for most of that
time.
Major? Perhaps if you're in the business, but certainly not
for ordinary shoppers.
Virtually everyone I discuss the issue with is well aware of it...
Until the folks I've met in this thread.
Post by sf
That term was never on my radar screen with a meaning anywhere close
to retail until this thread.
The *term* is new, but you'll note we are not discussing the term in
this subthread, but the *concept*.

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.

-Resolved: To be more temperate in my postings.
Oct 5th, 2004 JDL
Gregory Morrow
2004-11-29 15:08:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Lyons
Post by sf
Post by Derek Lyons
Then you've been hiding in a cellar. It's been a major retail concept
for twenty-thirty years and covered in the media for most of that
time.
Major? Perhaps if you're in the business, but certainly not
for ordinary shoppers.
Virtually everyone I discuss the issue with is well aware of it...
Until the folks I've met in this thread.
Post by sf
That term was never on my radar screen with a meaning anywhere close
to retail until this thread.
The *term* is new, but you'll note we are not discussing the term in
this subthread, but the *concept*.
I'm well aware of the *concept*, but have never heard the *term* -- and I
consider myself reasonably well - read (and that includes perusing daily the
_Wall Street Journal_, the _Financial Times_, and the bizness pages of other
major papers)...
--
Best
Greg
Post by Derek Lyons
D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.
-Resolved: To be more temperate in my postings.
Oct 5th, 2004 JDL
Derek Lyons
2004-11-29 18:50:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gregory Morrow
I'm well aware of the *concept*, but have never heard the *term* -- and I
consider myself reasonably well - read (and that includes perusing daily the
_Wall Street Journal_, the _Financial Times_, and the bizness pages of other
major papers)...
Then why write: "Well this is the first time I've ever heard the term
(and I'm 50). It's just another concept the media cooked up to catch
folks' attention..."

D.
--
Touch-twice life. Eat. Drink. Laugh.

-Resolved: To be more temperate in my postings.
Oct 5th, 2004 JDL
sf
2004-11-30 07:47:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Lyons
Post by Gregory Morrow
I'm well aware of the *concept*, but have never heard the *term* -- and I
consider myself reasonably well - read (and that includes perusing daily the
_Wall Street Journal_, the _Financial Times_, and the bizness pages of other
major papers)...
Then why write: "Well this is the first time I've ever heard the term
(and I'm 50). It's just another concept the media cooked up to catch
folks' attention..."
Are you equating "term" with "concept"?

Both Gregory and I (plus others) have stated that that term
connected with the concept of seasonal profit is NEW. If
you want us to say that Black Friday has NEVER been
associated with the kick off day of business profit during
the Christmas Season up to this point, consider it said.

sf
Practice safe eating - always use condiments
blake murphy
2004-12-03 08:27:41 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 15:08:43 GMT, "Gregory Morrow"
Post by Gregory Morrow
Post by Derek Lyons
Post by sf
Post by Derek Lyons
Then you've been hiding in a cellar. It's been a major retail concept
for twenty-thirty years and covered in the media for most of that
time.
Major? Perhaps if you're in the business, but certainly not
for ordinary shoppers.
Virtually everyone I discuss the issue with is well aware of it...
Until the folks I've met in this thread.
Post by sf
That term was never on my radar screen with a meaning anywhere close
to retail until this thread.
The *term* is new, but you'll note we are not discussing the term in
this subthread, but the *concept*.
I'm well aware of the *concept*, but have never heard the *term* -- and I
consider myself reasonably well - read (and that includes perusing daily the
_Wall Street Journal_, the _Financial Times_, and the bizness pages of other
major papers)...
it sounded like 'folk etymology' to me...

your pal,
blake

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