Discussion:
Replacing cookware
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ItsJoan NotJoAnn
2021-12-28 22:46:53 UTC
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Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
Bryan Simmons
2021-12-29 01:14:01 UTC
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Permalink
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
Yeah, I think Popeye discovered that some obscure dago pans are the
finest shit in the universe. I forget the brand, but all others are
tiad.
These are an Italian brand, but likely made in China. Some things
made in China are fine, because they are made with Japanese
steel. The Japanese and Germans make good steel. So do the
Americans and Canadians, what we still make.

When it comes right down to it, I bought disposable cookware. It
doesn't even matter much that I bought it *deeply* discounted. I
have old Corningware that is great for the oven, and now I have
stainless for everything else. It is nice that I still have some of
those ceramic pans that are nice, and work super well for grilled
cheese sandwiches. This one was from this evening.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/***@N08/51784250829/in/dateposted-public/

I put the cheese on one piece of bread, and microwave it at 10%
power in the inverter microwave for a couple of minutes, just
enough to get the cheese somewhat adhered to the bread. After
taking it out I put the cold sliced roast beef on, and butter the top
piece. Then I flip the plate, applying pressure with fingers, and
set it into the pan, then butter the other side. The cheese melts,
more or less (this evening it was less), but the beef stays medium
rare. I put the cheese in the picture because ALDI USA sells a
really nice Irish Cheddar at a decent price.

--Bryan
Bruce
2021-12-29 01:24:21 UTC
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On Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:14:01 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
Yeah, I think Popeye discovered that some obscure dago pans are the
finest shit in the universe. I forget the brand, but all others are
tiad.
These are an Italian brand, but likely made in China. Some things
made in China are fine, because they are made with Japanese
steel. The Japanese and Germans make good steel. So do the
Americans and Canadians, what we still make.
I'm assuming you've tested a lot of forks.
Michael Trew
2021-12-29 06:02:49 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
Yeah, I think Popeye discovered that some obscure dago pans are the
finest shit in the universe. I forget the brand, but all others are
tiad.
These are an Italian brand, but likely made in China. Some things
made in China are fine, because they are made with Japanese
steel. The Japanese and Germans make good steel. So do the
Americans and Canadians, what we still make.
When it comes right down to it, I bought disposable cookware.
--Bryan
Even "deeply discounted", why not buy something meant to last? I picked
up my vintage stainless steel copper bottom Revereware for cheaper than
you can get even the worst stainless pans new, and I bet it'll last my
lifetime.
GM
2021-12-29 06:08:02 UTC
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Permalink
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
Yeah, I think Popeye discovered that some obscure dago pans are the
finest shit in the universe. I forget the brand, but all others are
tiad.
These are an Italian brand, but likely made in China. Some things
made in China are fine, because they are made with Japanese
steel. The Japanese and Germans make good steel. So do the
Americans and Canadians, what we still make.
When it comes right down to it, I bought disposable cookware.
--Bryan
Even "deeply discounted", why not buy something meant to last? I picked
up my vintage stainless steel copper bottom Revereware for cheaper than
you can get even the worst stainless pans new, and I bet it'll last my
lifetime.
Bryan is 60 - ish...

;-)
--
GM
Michael Trew
2021-12-29 06:26:48 UTC
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Post by GM
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
Yeah, I think Popeye discovered that some obscure dago pans are the
finest shit in the universe. I forget the brand, but all others are
tiad.
These are an Italian brand, but likely made in China. Some things
made in China are fine, because they are made with Japanese
steel. The Japanese and Germans make good steel. So do the
Americans and Canadians, what we still make.
When it comes right down to it, I bought disposable cookware.
--Bryan
Even "deeply discounted", why not buy something meant to last? I picked
up my vintage stainless steel copper bottom Revereware for cheaper than
you can get even the worst stainless pans new, and I bet it'll last my
lifetime.
Bryan is 60 - ish...
;-)
Well then his son can inherit them!
Bryan Simmons
2021-12-29 09:39:26 UTC
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Permalink
Post by GM
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
Yeah, I think Popeye discovered that some obscure dago pans are the
finest shit in the universe. I forget the brand, but all others are
tiad.
These are an Italian brand, but likely made in China. Some things
made in China are fine, because they are made with Japanese
steel. The Japanese and Germans make good steel. So do the
Americans and Canadians, what we still make.
When it comes right down to it, I bought disposable cookware.
--Bryan
Even "deeply discounted", why not buy something meant to last? I picked
up my vintage stainless steel copper bottom Revereware for cheaper than
you can get even the worst stainless pans new, and I bet it'll last my
lifetime.
Bryan is 60 - ish...
61, and I bought them for their supposed non-stickiness. The new set
should easily outlive me. Heck, I could start taking SS in less than a
year. Of course, *I* have a job. It's a lowly retail job, and well, you know.
Post by GM
--
GM
--Bryan
Bryan Simmons
2021-12-31 08:32:12 UTC
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Permalink
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
I topped off the set with a good sized dutch oven.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Copper-Elegance-Stainless-Steel-5-7-Qt-Covered-Dutch-Oven-/p/2100120094

--Bryan
Sheldon Martin
2021-12-31 11:52:24 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed. I don't see the point to that copper lid, you
can't cook on it but it'll be good practice for polishing.
Post by Bryan Simmons
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
I topped off the set with a good sized dutch oven.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Copper-Elegance-Stainless-Steel-5-7-Qt-Covered-Dutch-Oven-/p/2100120094
--Bryan
Ed Pawlowski
2021-12-31 14:31:11 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed. I don't see the point to that copper lid, you
can't cook on it but it'll be good practice for polishing.
I use the 1 qt at least once a week. Holds 4 eggs. I take two out for
soft boiled today, leave the other two sit a while for hard boiled
tomorrow.
Sheldon Martin
2021-12-31 19:00:01 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Sheldon Martin
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed. I don't see the point to that copper lid, you
can't cook on it but it'll be good practice for polishing.
I use the 1 qt at least once a week. Holds 4 eggs. I take two out for
soft boiled today, leave the other two sit a while for hard boiled
tomorrow.
A 2 quart is as small as I use, and works well for boiling four eggs.
A 1 quart barely holds four large eggs, as they heat they expand and
push against each other, one or two can crack. I wouldn't keep a one
quart pot if only to boil eggs, any size pot can boil eggs. When I
want to boil several eggs, like a dozen for egg salad, I boil them in
a french fry basket, easy to take them all out at once and plunge them
into cold water to stop the cooking and makes for easy peeling. I got
tired of shuffling that one quart pot around so retired it to the wild
bird seed sack... a perfect size for scooping and pouring seeds into
the bird feeder... perfect for scooping and pouring dry cat food too.
Bruce
2022-01-01 03:37:42 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Sheldon Martin
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed. I don't see the point to that copper lid, you
can't cook on it but it'll be good practice for polishing.
I use the 1 qt at least once a week. Holds 4 eggs. I take two out for
soft boiled today, leave the other two sit a while for hard boiled
tomorrow.
A 2 quart is as small as I use, and works well for boiling four eggs.
A 1 quart barely holds four large eggs, as they heat they expand and
push against each other, one or two can crack. I wouldn't keep a one
quart pot if only to boil eggs, any size pot can boil eggs. When I
want to boil several eggs, like a dozen for egg salad, I boil them in
a french fry basket, easy to take them all out at once and plunge them
into cold water to stop the cooking and makes for easy peeling. I got
tired of shuffling that one quart pot around so retired it to the wild
bird seed sack... a perfect size for scooping and pouring seeds into
the bird feeder... perfect for scooping and pouring dry cat food too.
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Bruce
2021-12-31 21:43:18 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Sheldon Martin
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed. I don't see the point to that copper lid, you
can't cook on it but it'll be good practice for polishing.
I use the 1 qt at least once a week. Holds 4 eggs. I take two out for
soft boiled today, leave the other two sit a while for hard boiled
tomorrow.
Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Hank Rogers
2021-12-31 19:38:59 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed. I don't see the point to that copper lid, you
can't cook on it but it'll be good practice for polishing.
Popeye, tell us about yoose 50 gallon steam kettle.
Bruce
2021-12-31 19:54:26 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 11:43:44 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
Clearance. 70% off.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed. I don't see the point to that copper lid, you
can't cook on it but it'll be good practice for polishing.
Post by Bryan Simmons
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
I topped off the set with a good sized dutch oven.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Copper-Elegance-Stainless-Steel-5-7-Qt-Covered-Dutch-Oven-/p/2100120094
--Bryan
--Bryan
A messy post if ever I saw one.
Bruce
2021-12-31 21:12:34 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:56:43 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bruce
A messy post if ever I saw one.
Talk about a whiny little bitch. You not only sympathize with
Kuthe, you're adopting his playground mannerisms.
I don't have much of an opinion about Kuthe. I'm just surprised that,
after all these years, you're still struggling with Usenet. You're a
very slow learner.
Bruce
2021-12-31 23:02:43 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:56:43 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bruce
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 11:43:44 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
Clearance. 70% off.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed. I don't see the point to that copper lid, you
can't cook on it but it'll be good practice for polishing.
Post by Bryan Simmons
I think you'll be quite pleased with the tri-ply cookware. Congratulations!
(Sheldon will be along shortly to tell you that you should have bought what he uses.)
I topped off the set with a good sized dutch oven.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Copper-Elegance-Stainless-Steel-5-7-Qt-Covered-Dutch-Oven-/p/2100120094
--Bryan
--Bryan
A messy post if ever I saw one.
Talk about a whiny little bitch. You not only sympathize with
Kuthe, you're adopting his playground mannerisms. Maybe it's
from sniffing his asshole.
--Bryan
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-12-31 20:05:37 UTC
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Permalink
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed.
I have a 1-quart that I use for making browned butter and a few other
things in small quantity.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 01:30:42 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed.
I have a 1-quart that I use for making browned butter and a few other
things in small quantity.
Cindy Hamilton
Yes, it's nice for that, melting butter, etc. I find it hard to believe
that Sheldon really has no other use for a 1 qt saucepan, other than as
a scoop. I'd hate to have to wash out a huge pot just for something
small like that.
Hank Rogers
2022-01-01 01:54:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some
haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I
bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
I don't buy pots as a set, there will always be one you'll never use
for cooking, like that 1qt pot... I have a one qt pot that I use for
scooping bird seed.
I have a 1-quart that I use for making browned butter and a few other
things in small quantity.
Cindy Hamilton
Yes, it's nice for that, melting butter, etc.  I find it hard to
believe that Sheldon really has no other use for a 1 qt saucepan,
other than as a scoop.  I'd hate to have to wash out a huge pot
just for something small like that.
Popeye always cooks huge quantities of foods. I imagine he must
have a bad case of tapeworms, so he needs lots of grub.
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 19:19:49 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I have a 1-quart that I use for making browned butter and a few other
things in small quantity.
Cindy Hamilton
Yes, it's nice for that, melting butter, etc. I find it hard to believe
that Sheldon really has no other use for a 1 qt saucepan, other than as
a scoop. I'd hate to have to wash out a huge pot just for something
small like that.
I have sets of kitchen scoops; aluminum, SS, plastic, but for filling
my bird feeders with seeds that one quart pot works the best, no
spillage, and I don't need a measured amount of bird seed. That one
quart pot works very well for filling cat food bowls with kibbles.
I have one cat, and I have an old aluminum one cup scoop for kibble.
I know they toss in a one quart pot with most every potset so people
will think they're getting something extra but I can't imagine anyone
cooks in that ittybiddy pot, I never have. I've never hard boiled
less than a dozen eggs, what we don't eat goes in the fridge for
later, my wife brings 2-3 hard cooked eggs to eat at school, I'll do
the same for lunch, I like sliced eggs in a sandwich. I think it's
silly to boil a dozen eggs two at a time... and neither of us likes
soft boiled... we like runny over easy but not boiled.
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only boil
2-4 eggs at a time. I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I wouldn't
want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't have any
other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
Gary
2022-01-02 11:33:43 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only boil
2-4 eggs at a time.  I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I wouldn't
want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't have any
other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
songbird
2022-01-02 16:07:02 UTC
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Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only boil
2-4 eggs at a time.  I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I wouldn't
want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't have any
other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
it depends upon how much cookie making or other baking Mom is
doing but for us a normal month probably uses about 50 eggs.
peak baking we may buy three containers of 18 eggs and use those
up over a weekend. just depends upon what she's up to. i like
to eat a few boiled eggs here or there as a snack or a few eggs
sunny side up or soft-boiled. tapioca pudding is a more recent
thing that i enjoy (instead of sweeter and heavier puddings i like
it in the hot part of the summer the best). now that it has
gotten colder out i no longer have a craving for this. hmmm...
funny... :)


songbird
Ed Pawlowski
2022-01-02 17:04:26 UTC
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Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only boil
2-4 eggs at a time.  I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I wouldn't
want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't have any
other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
   it depends upon how much cookie making or other baking Mom is
doing but for us a normal month probably uses about 50 eggs.
peak baking we may buy three containers of 18 eggs and use those
up over a weekend.  just depends upon what she's up to.  i like
to eat a few boiled eggs here or there as a snack or a few eggs
sunny side up or soft-boiled.  tapioca pudding is a more recent
thing that i enjoy (instead of sweeter and heavier puddings i like
it in the hot part of the summer the best).  now that it has
gotten colder out i no longer have a craving for this.  hmmm...
funny...  :)
I have never understood why so many people dislike tapioca pudding. I
can see that they might find it a little bland, but it's not like there
is any strong or tart flavour to turn people off. I have always liked
it.  It's very hard to find pearl tapioca these days so I have to settle
for minute.
Probably more of a texture than taste thing. I like rice pudding. I
get is frequently at a food truck near me. They have a 16 oz container.
Has a very nice custard/vanilla flavor. I soak raisins in rum and mix
it it to make it even better.
Dave Smith
2022-01-02 17:40:37 UTC
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I have never understood why so many people dislike tapioca pudding. I
can see that they might find it a little bland, but it's not like
there is any strong or tart flavour to turn people off. I have always
liked it.  It's very hard to find pearl tapioca these days so I have
to settle for minute.
Probably more of a texture than taste thing.  I like rice pudding.  I
get is frequently at a food truck near me.  They have a 16 oz container.
 Has a very nice custard/vanilla flavor.  I soak raisins in rum and mix
it it to make it even better.
That is another thing that puzzles me about it. I like the texture. I
find it strange that people seem to especially dislike the pearl
variety, fish eyes and glue, which I much prefer.

I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
Graham
2022-01-02 19:30:15 UTC
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I have never understood why so many people dislike tapioca pudding. I
can see that they might find it a little bland, but it's not like
there is any strong or tart flavour to turn people off. I have always
liked it.  It's very hard to find pearl tapioca these days so I have
to settle for minute.
Probably more of a texture than taste thing.  I like rice pudding.  I
get is frequently at a food truck near me.  They have a 16 oz
container.   Has a very nice custard/vanilla flavor.  I soak raisins
in rum and mix it it to make it even better.
That is another thing that puzzles me about it. I like the texture.  I
find it strange that people seem to especially dislike the pearl
variety, fish eyes and glue, which I much prefer.
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
They used to serve it at lunch when I was at school. I liked it but
could never understand why the other kids turned up their noses at it.
Bruce
2022-01-02 20:18:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
I have never understood why so many people dislike tapioca pudding. I
can see that they might find it a little bland, but it's not like
there is any strong or tart flavour to turn people off. I have always
liked it.  It's very hard to find pearl tapioca these days so I have
to settle for minute.
Probably more of a texture than taste thing.  I like rice pudding.  I
get is frequently at a food truck near me.  They have a 16 oz
container.   Has a very nice custard/vanilla flavor.  I soak raisins
in rum and mix it it to make it even better.
That is another thing that puzzles me about it. I like the texture.  I
find it strange that people seem to especially dislike the pearl
variety, fish eyes and glue, which I much prefer.
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
They used to serve it at lunch when I was at school. I liked it but
could never understand why the other kids turned up their noses at it.
Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
dsi1
2022-01-02 19:57:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
I have never understood why so many people dislike tapioca pudding. I
can see that they might find it a little bland, but it's not like
there is any strong or tart flavour to turn people off. I have always
liked it. It's very hard to find pearl tapioca these days so I have
to settle for minute.
Probably more of a texture than taste thing. I like rice pudding. I
get is frequently at a food truck near me. They have a 16 oz container.
Has a very nice custard/vanilla flavor. I soak raisins in rum and mix
it it to make it even better.
That is another thing that puzzles me about it. I like the texture. I
find it strange that people seem to especially dislike the pearl
variety, fish eyes and glue, which I much prefer.
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
Bruce
2022-01-02 19:59:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
Bruce
2022-01-02 20:17:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
This is my frogger.
Bruce
2022-01-02 20:17:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
It's some kind of root. It's poisonous unless it cooked. Shrimp chips are made from tapioca. Shrimp chips are good.

Ghe Ghe Ghe
Bruce
2022-01-02 20:26:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
It's some kind of root. It's poisonous unless it cooked. Shrimp chips are made from tapioca. Shrimp chips are good.
I know shrimp chips as krupuk. I don't think the Indonesians use
tapioca flour for it. Wikipedia says the Philipinos do. And tapioca
comes from cassava which is native to Brazil, or so I just read.
dsi1
2022-01-02 20:50:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
It's some kind of root. It's poisonous unless it cooked. Shrimp chips are made from tapioca. Shrimp chips are good.
I know shrimp chips as krupuk. I don't think the Indonesians use
tapioca flour for it. Wikipedia says the Philipinos do. And tapioca
comes from cassava which is native to Brazil, or so I just read.
The old shrimp chips were made from tapioca starch. The new ones can be made from cornstarch and or tapioca starch.
Bruce
2022-01-02 22:12:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
It's some kind of root. It's poisonous unless it cooked. Shrimp chips are made from tapioca. Shrimp chips are good.
I know shrimp chips as krupuk. I don't think the Indonesians use
tapioca flour for it. Wikipedia says the Philipinos do. And tapioca
comes from cassava which is native to Brazil, or so I just read.
The old shrimp chips were made from tapioca starch. The new ones can be made from cornstarch and or tapioca starch.
Yes, the Philipino version, apparently.
Bruce
2022-01-02 22:20:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
It's some kind of root. It's poisonous unless it cooked. Shrimp chips are made from tapioca. Shrimp chips are good.
I know shrimp chips as krupuk. I don't think the Indonesians use
tapioca flour for it. Wikipedia says the Philipinos do. And tapioca
comes from cassava which is native to Brazil, or so I just read.
The old shrimp chips were made from tapioca starch. The new ones can be made from cornstarch and or tapioca starch.
Yes, the Philipino version, apparently.
This is my frogger.
Bruce
2022-01-03 03:37:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
It's some kind of root. It's poisonous unless it cooked. Shrimp chips are made from tapioca. Shrimp chips are good.
I know shrimp chips as krupuk. I don't think the Indonesians use
tapioca flour for it. Wikipedia says the Philipinos do. And tapioca
comes from cassava which is native to Brazil, or so I just read.
The old shrimp chips were made from tapioca starch. The new ones can be made from cornstarch and or tapioca starch.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Ophelia
2022-01-02 21:39:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
I don't what it is, but I do remember eating tapioca pudding as a child:)
Bruce
2022-01-03 03:37:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
Post by Bruce
Post by dsi1
Post by Dave Smith
I was always a dessert lover and was thrilled when dessert was tapioca.
So many others liked it and there was lots more for me.
I never realized that a lot of folks didn't care for tapioca pudding but I guess you're right about that.
I have some shrimp chips that are made from tapioca starch. You fry them and they puff up. What could be more fun?
I've never had tapioca pudding. What is tapioca? An African root
vegetable? Like cassave?
I don't what it is, but I do remember eating tapioca pudding as a child:)
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Bruce
2022-01-03 00:52:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
It's not like an order of flavour preferences, like chocolate, vanilla
or butterscotch. They really hate it. I don't understand it. I love the
stuff. If I ever come across pearl tapioca I will by a lot of it and
enjoy some fish eyes and glue.
Count me in the group that really likes tapioca pudding. Yum!
This is not my frogger.
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-03 01:06:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
It's not like an order of flavour preferences, like chocolate, vanilla
or butterscotch. They really hate it. I don't understand it. I love the
stuff. If I ever come across pearl tapioca I will by a lot of it and
enjoy some fish eyes and glue.
Count me in the group that really likes tapioca pudding. Yum!
Me! Large pearl tapioca.
Bruce
2022-01-03 01:32:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
It's not like an order of flavour preferences, like chocolate, vanilla
or butterscotch. They really hate it. I don't understand it. I love the
stuff. If I ever come across pearl tapioca I will by a lot of it and
enjoy some fish eyes and glue.
Count me in the group that really likes tapioca pudding. Yum!
Me! Large pearl tapioca.
Ghe
Michael Trew
2022-01-02 23:37:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by songbird
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only boil
2-4 eggs at a time. I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I wouldn't
want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't have any
other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
it depends upon how much cookie making or other baking Mom is
doing but for us a normal month probably uses about 50 eggs.
peak baking we may buy three containers of 18 eggs and use those
up over a weekend. just depends upon what she's up to. i like
to eat a few boiled eggs here or there as a snack or a few eggs
sunny side up or soft-boiled. tapioca pudding is a more recent
thing that i enjoy (instead of sweeter and heavier puddings i like
it in the hot part of the summer the best). now that it has
gotten colder out i no longer have a craving for this. hmmm...
funny... :)
songbird
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca. What recipe do you use? That
sounds good!
Dave Smith
2022-01-03 00:22:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
Post by Gary
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
    tapioca pudding is a more recent
thing that i enjoy (instead of sweeter and heavier puddings i like
it in the hot part of the summer the best).  now that it has
gotten colder out i no longer have a craving for this.  hmmm...
funny...  :)
   songbird
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca.  What recipe do you use?  That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.

It's pretty easy. Mix the tapioca, sugar, milk and eff and let it sit
for about 10 minutes. Then heat it up and bring it to a boil stirring
constantly. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. If you want a lighter
texture you can separate the eggs and beat the whites and then fold them
in quickly when you take it off the heat.

I prefer the pearl tapioca but it is more complicated because you have
to soak the tapioca for a while before cooking, and it takes longer to
cook it up. It is well worth the extra work.
Dave Smith
2022-01-03 17:43:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
in quickly when you take it off the heat.
Post by Dave Smith
I prefer the pearl tapioca but it is more complicated because you have
to soak the tapioca for a while before cooking, and it takes longer to
cook it up. It is well worth the extra work.
Thanks, I'll have to look into that.  I've had store bought prepared
tapioca, which is OK, but I feel like either of those options would be
better.
Tapioca is another one of those things where the home made product is
infinitely better than the canned version. It is cheap and easy to make.
Bruce 1
2022-01-04 04:11:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 12:43:00 -0500, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
in quickly when you take it off the heat.
Post by Dave Smith
I prefer the pearl tapioca but it is more complicated because you have
to soak the tapioca for a while before cooking, and it takes longer to
cook it up. It is well worth the extra work.
Thanks, I'll have to look into that.  I've had store bought prepared
tapioca, which is OK, but I feel like either of those options would be
better.
Tapioca is another one of those things where the home made product is
infinitely better than the canned version. It is cheap and easy to make.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
songbird
2022-01-03 22:44:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
...
Post by Dave Smith
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca.  What recipe do you use?  That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.
yes, all i do is reduce sugar by about 1/4-1/3 and use a
good vanilla.
Post by Dave Smith
It's pretty easy. Mix the tapioca, sugar, milk and eff and let it sit
for about 10 minutes. Then heat it up and bring it to a boil stirring
constantly. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. If you want a lighter
texture you can separate the eggs and beat the whites and then fold them
in quickly when you take it off the heat.
I prefer the pearl tapioca but it is more complicated because you have
to soak the tapioca for a while before cooking, and it takes longer to
cook it up. It is well worth the extra work.
if i ever see it i'll try it sometime because i do like
rice pudding and other lumpy things. :) in the meantime
i'll keep it as simple as possible. i don't do any folding
or separating of eggs and all i do is soak the tapioca for
five minutes like the directions say.

works out fine for me.


songbird
Bruce
2022-01-04 01:20:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by songbird
...
Post by Dave Smith
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca.  What recipe do you use?  That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.
yes, all i do is reduce sugar by about 1/4-1/3 and use a
good vanilla.
Post by Dave Smith
It's pretty easy. Mix the tapioca, sugar, milk and eff and let it sit
for about 10 minutes. Then heat it up and bring it to a boil stirring
constantly. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. If you want a lighter
texture you can separate the eggs and beat the whites and then fold them
in quickly when you take it off the heat.
I prefer the pearl tapioca but it is more complicated because you have
to soak the tapioca for a while before cooking, and it takes longer to
cook it up. It is well worth the extra work.
if i ever see it i'll try it sometime because i do like
rice pudding and other lumpy things. :) in the meantime
i'll keep it as simple as possible. i don't do any folding
or separating of eggs and all i do is soak the tapioca for
five minutes like the directions say.
works out fine for me.
songbird
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Michael Trew
2022-01-04 20:06:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by songbird
....
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Michael Trew
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca. What recipe do you use? That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.
yes, all i do is reduce sugar by about 1/4-1/3 and use a
good vanilla.
I'm always too cheap for real vanilla. The itty bitty bottles cost so
much... a large bottle of artificial vanilla costs less than half of
what the itty bitty bottles go for.

I'm going to take an ancient bottle of vodka that was my grandfathers,
and make home made vanilla extract in it from split dried vanilla beans.
Those beans are also pricy, but for a 1.5 - 2 qt or so of better than
store bought extract (so I've heard), it's worth that cost for sure. It
might even end up costing less than the equivalent amount of fake vanilla.
Jeßus
2022-01-04 20:14:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 15:06:47 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by songbird
....
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Michael Trew
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca. What recipe do you use? That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.
yes, all i do is reduce sugar by about 1/4-1/3 and use a
good vanilla.
I'm always too cheap for real vanilla. The itty bitty bottles cost so
much... a large bottle of artificial vanilla costs less than half of
what the itty bitty bottles go for.
I'm going to take an ancient bottle of vodka that was my grandfathers,
and make home made vanilla extract in it from split dried vanilla beans.
Those beans are also pricy, but for a 1.5 - 2 qt or so of better than
store bought extract (so I've heard), it's worth that cost for sure. It
might even end up costing less than the equivalent amount of fake vanilla.
BTDT, must be 10 years ago now. I still have two 1 litre bottles in
the cupboard, still looks, smells and tastes good. I bought some beans
from New Guinea (after some research). I used to distill spirits, so
the 'vodka' wasn't a problem. An easy process and better than any
bought vanilla extract I've tried. I doubt we'll ever get through it
all at the rate we use it though.
Michael Trew
2022-01-05 18:35:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jeßus
On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 15:06:47 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by songbird
....
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Michael Trew
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca. What recipe do you use? That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.
yes, all i do is reduce sugar by about 1/4-1/3 and use a
good vanilla.
I'm always too cheap for real vanilla. The itty bitty bottles cost so
much... a large bottle of artificial vanilla costs less than half of
what the itty bitty bottles go for.
I'm going to take an ancient bottle of vodka that was my grandfathers,
and make home made vanilla extract in it from split dried vanilla beans.
Those beans are also pricy, but for a 1.5 - 2 qt or so of better than
store bought extract (so I've heard), it's worth that cost for sure. It
might even end up costing less than the equivalent amount of fake vanilla.
BTDT, must be 10 years ago now. I still have two 1 litre bottles in
the cupboard, still looks, smells and tastes good. I bought some beans
from New Guinea (after some research). I used to distill spirits, so
the 'vodka' wasn't a problem. An easy process and better than any
bought vanilla extract I've tried. I doubt we'll ever get through it
all at the rate we use it though.
Thanks, that's what I expected.
Thomas
2022-01-04 23:24:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by songbird
....
Post by Dave Smith
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca. What recipe do you use? That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.
yes, all i do is reduce sugar by about 1/4-1/3 and use a
good vanilla.
I'm always too cheap for real vanilla. The itty bitty bottles cost so
much... a large bottle of artificial vanilla costs less than half of
what the itty bitty bottles go for.
I'm going to take an ancient bottle of vodka that was my grandfathers,
and make home made vanilla extract in it from split dried vanilla beans.
Those beans are also pricy, but for a 1.5 - 2 qt or so of better than
store bought extract (so I've heard), it's worth that cost for sure. It
might even end up costing less than the equivalent amount of fake vanilla.
I tossed 10 beans I split in a 16 oz empty water bottle covered in vodka in March 2021.
Recommendation was a 6 month wait. I started baking and making ice cream a month or so ago.
It is good stuff. 10 bucks for 16 oz. The tiny 1 oz Mccormick was maybe 4 or 5 bucks.
I am 50 bucks to the good.
Dave Smith
2022-01-05 01:10:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Thomas
Post by Michael Trew
I'm going to take an ancient bottle of vodka that was my
grandfathers, and make home made vanilla extract in it from split
dried vanilla beans. Those beans are also pricy, but for a 1.5 -
2 qt or so of better than store bought extract (so I've heard),
it's worth that cost for sure. It might even end up costing less
than the equivalent amount of fake vanilla.
I tossed 10 beans I split in a 16 oz empty water bottle covered in
vodka in March 2021. Recommendation was a 6 month wait. I started
baking and making ice cream a month or so ago. It is good stuff. 10
bucks for 16 oz. The tiny 1 oz Mccormick was maybe 4 or 5 bucks. I
am 50 bucks to the good.
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks. At
those prices, I used to just go crazy with the stuff. These days, I'm
somewhat restrained when using it. That's the breaks.
A local restaurant supply store used to sell bottles of Watkins vanilla
extract for about $12. When prices soared I went there to get some but
they had none in stock. I asked about it and was told they were not
carrying it anymore because they would have had to charge $25 for it. At
the time, that would have been a pretty good price.

I am glad I don't make any ice cream anymore. The recipe that I used to
use called for one vanilla bean simmered in the custard mix plus 3
Tablespoons vanilla extract added. For the cost of vanilla I could get
a gallon of a premium vanilla ice cream.
Ed Pawlowski
2022-01-05 14:29:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Maybe he did in 1964. You can get the good stuff from Tahiti for on
$378 for a quart. Free shipping too, makes it a bargain
https://tinyurl.com/bdd832kh
bob
2022-01-05 14:49:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Maybe he did in 1964. You can get the good stuff from Tahiti for on
$378 for a quart. Free shipping too, makes it a bargain
https://tinyurl.com/bdd832kh
No Costco in 1964. Six dollars must have been for a very small bottle.
Glad I don't use much of the stuff. I probably have enough to last
another 20 years. Also saw yesterday that I have two bottles (for some
reason??) of Angostura bitters. Probably enough to last me 100 years.
Maybe I won't need it then. The small bottle of truffles infused oil
I bought in Paris 10 years ago fell off the shelf and broke. (thats
the breaks) Oh well didn't much like it anyway.
Mike Duffy
2022-01-05 21:37:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bob
Also saw yesterday that I have two bottles
(for some reason??) of Angostura bitters.
If you ever figure it out, be sure to let me know. I have two bottles as
well and cannot figure out how that could have happened.

Perhaps my spice cabinet has an intermittent portal to a parallel
universe, and somewhere else a duplicate of myself is rooting around
looking for a missing bottle.
Arnie
2022-01-05 21:41:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by bob
Also saw yesterday that I have two bottles
(for some reason??) of Angostura bitters.
If you ever figure it out, be sure to let me know. I have two bottles as
well and cannot figure out how that could have happened.
Perhaps my spice cabinet has an intermittent portal to a parallel
universe, and somewhere else a duplicate of myself is rooting around
looking for a missing bottle.
Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Hank Rogers
2022-01-05 22:16:50 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike Duffy
Post by bob
Also saw yesterday that I have two bottles
(for some reason??) of Angostura bitters.
If you ever figure it out, be sure to let me know. I have two bottles as
well and cannot figure out how that could have happened.
Perhaps my spice cabinet has an intermittent portal to a parallel
universe, and somewhere else a duplicate of myself is rooting around
looking for a missing bottle.
The two of yoose would be quantum entangled though. And there would
be a pair of entangled druces simultaneously sniffing both your asses.

When you return, you'll be the same age as when you left.

The druces are time invariant, and will continue to sniff.
Arnie
2022-01-05 22:31:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by bob
Also saw yesterday that I have two bottles
(for some reason??) of Angostura bitters.
If you ever figure it out, be sure to let me know. I have two bottles as
well and cannot figure out how that could have happened.
Perhaps my spice cabinet has an intermittent portal to a parallel
universe, and somewhere else a duplicate of myself is rooting around
looking for a missing bottle.
The two of yoose would be quantum entangled though. And there would
be a pair of entangled druces simultaneously sniffing both your asses.
When you return, you'll be the same age as when you left.
The druces are time invariant, and will continue to sniff.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
bob
2022-01-05 22:27:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by bob
Also saw yesterday that I have two bottles
(for some reason??) of Angostura bitters.
If you ever figure it out, be sure to let me know. I have two bottles as
well and cannot figure out how that could have happened.
Perhaps my spice cabinet has an intermittent portal to a parallel
universe, and somewhere else a duplicate of myself is rooting around
looking for a missing bottle.
The only reason I have it is for a Scotch Old Fashion which I have not
made in a decade even though I like 'em. If I ever find some Scotch I
may have another. There are other reason to use it but I don't
remember what they are.

Scotch is odd for me. I only like the expensive stuff. Most other
liquor middle of the road works fine. Pretty sure that's why I am not
finding any here $$$.
Arnie
2022-01-05 22:30:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bob
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by bob
Also saw yesterday that I have two bottles
(for some reason??) of Angostura bitters.
If you ever figure it out, be sure to let me know. I have two bottles as
well and cannot figure out how that could have happened.
Perhaps my spice cabinet has an intermittent portal to a parallel
universe, and somewhere else a duplicate of myself is rooting around
looking for a missing bottle.
The only reason I have it is for a Scotch Old Fashion which I have not
made in a decade even though I like 'em. If I ever find some Scotch I
may have another. There are other reason to use it but I don't
remember what they are.
Scotch is odd for me. I only like the expensive stuff. Most other
liquor middle of the road works fine. Pretty sure that's why I am not
finding any here $$$.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
dsi1
2022-01-05 22:17:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Maybe he did in 1964. You can get the good stuff from Tahiti for on
$378 for a quart. Free shipping too, makes it a bargain
https://tinyurl.com/bdd832kh
You old guys crack me up. $378/quart for vanilla is for suckers.

Loading Image...
dsi1
2022-01-05 22:03:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!

https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
dsi1
2022-01-05 22:18:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Arnie
2022-01-05 22:30:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Jeßus
2022-01-05 22:45:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Maybe it was artificial vanilla which is made from the ass end of a
beaver. You probably can buy a gallon for 6$. Some say it works in
baking about the same. Odd though that the ass end of a beaver could
taste anything like vanilla.:)
Yes, pretty much what I was assuming - that he's really talking about
artificial vanilla. Big difference IMO.
Dave Smith
2022-01-05 23:31:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jeßus
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Maybe it was artificial vanilla which is made from the ass end of a
beaver. You probably can buy a gallon for 6$. Some say it works in
baking about the same. Odd though that the ass end of a beaver could
taste anything like vanilla.:)
Yes, pretty much what I was assuming - that he's really talking about
artificial vanilla. Big difference IMO.
Artificial vanilla is made in paper plants. I lived for a year in a
small city that had a couple paper plants and I could often smell
vanilla in the air.

I used to used only artificial vanilla until I learned how much better
the real stuff is. It was worth the extra money. Over the last few years
it has got way to expensive. I tend to go along with the suggestion that
if it is being cooked it is hard to tell the difference, so I mix a
little real into the artificial. If is is not cooked I stick with real.
Graham
2022-01-05 23:51:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Jeßus
Post by dsi1
On Wed, 5 Jan 2022 14:03:04 -0800 (PST), dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Maybe it was artificial vanilla which is made from the ass end of a
beaver.  You probably can buy a gallon for 6$.  Some say it works in
baking about the same.  Odd though that the ass end of a beaver could
taste anything like vanilla.:)
Yes, pretty much what I was assuming - that he's really talking about
artificial vanilla. Big difference IMO.
Artificial vanilla is made in paper plants. I lived for a year in a
small city that had a couple paper plants and I could often smell
vanilla in the air.
I used to used only artificial vanilla until I learned how much better
the real stuff is. It was worth the extra money. Over the last few years
it has got way to expensive. I tend to go along with the suggestion that
if it is being cooked it is hard to tell the difference, so I mix a
little  real into the artificial. If is is not cooked I stick with real.
Life is too short to compromise! I use the real stuff.
dsi1
2022-01-05 22:58:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Currently, vanilla extract goes for about $35/pint at the warehouse stores in America. I could probably get it cheaper at a restaurant supply store. Can you show me an example of a proper extract that you use? I don't know what "proper extract" means.
Jeßus
2022-01-05 23:04:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Currently, vanilla extract goes for about $35/pint at the warehouse stores in America. I could probably get it cheaper at a restaurant supply store. Can you show me an example of a proper extract that you use? I don't know what "proper extract" means.
I made a large batch of my own vanilla extract about 10 years ago, and
still have more than a pint left. But this link explains the
difference:

"Pure Vanilla Extract

Vanilla beans are expensive, retailing in some specialty shops for as
much as $2 to $3 each. The price of pure vanilla extract is also high,
but this can vary due to the quality of the beans used to make it. The
best vanilla beans are the products of orchids that grow only in
tropical climates. Beware of "pure" vanilla extract that seems
unusually cheap. If the bargain seems to be too good to be true, it's
probably an adulterated extract or the beans were of poor quality.

Pure vanilla extract must contain 13.35 ounces of vanilla beans per
gallon during extraction. The extract must be 35 percent alcohol to
meet FDA standards.1 These are the minimum requirements. Additional
alcohol content is allowed and results in a deeper, richer flavor.

By FDA definition, a "pure" extract means that the vanilla flavor can
only come from vanilla beans and nothing else.1 This factor draws a
definitive line between pure extract and imitation vanilla, but it
relates only to the vanilla flavor and doesn't necessarily mean that
nothing other than vanilla beans contributed to the overall product.
It's not uncommon to find vanilla extracts that contain a little sugar
or corn syrup, and this is perfectly legal because neither contributes
to that vanilla taste.

Pure vanilla extract that has no added sugar or corn syrup will last
forever, aging like a fine liqueur. The older the extract, the better
it becomes, losing any bitterness even without the help of added
sweeteners.

You can make vanilla extract at home by soaking fresh vanilla beans in
vodka or another neutral-flavored liquor. Simply split the beans,
scrape the gooey seeds into the container, then cover it, pods and
all, with your spirit of choice. It takes about two months for the
extract to mature"

Imitation Vanilla Extract

Imitation vanilla is made from artificial flavorings, which isn't
surprising. What might raise your eyebrows is that most of these
artificial flavorings come from wood byproducts, and those byproducts
can contain chemicals. People with discerning palates usually find
that imitation vanilla products have a harsh quality with a slightly
bitter aftertaste.

If you're tempted to substitute imitation vanilla for pure vanilla
extract in a recipe, you will need twice as much imitation vanilla
flavoring to match the strength of pure vanilla extract, but this
comes with a risk. Imitation vanilla is typically made with synthetic
vanillin extracted from wood pulp, so you forgo the gentle vanilla
hint that you'd get with the real deal when you opt for imitation. In
other words, pure vanilla extract packs more into less. This might be
okay if the focus of the recipe isn't its vanilla flavoring;
otherwise, you'll probably want to spend more for pure vanilla
extract."
Arnie
2022-01-05 23:12:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jeßus
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Currently, vanilla extract goes for about $35/pint at the warehouse stores in America. I could probably get it cheaper at a restaurant supply store. Can you show me an example of a proper extract that you use? I don't know what "proper extract" means.
I made a large batch of my own vanilla extract about 10 years ago, and
still have more than a pint left. But this link explains the
"Pure Vanilla Extract
Vanilla beans are expensive, retailing in some specialty shops for as
much as $2 to $3 each. The price of pure vanilla extract is also high,
but this can vary due to the quality of the beans used to make it. The
best vanilla beans are the products of orchids that grow only in
tropical climates. Beware of "pure" vanilla extract that seems
unusually cheap. If the bargain seems to be too good to be true, it's
probably an adulterated extract or the beans were of poor quality.
Pure vanilla extract must contain 13.35 ounces of vanilla beans per
gallon during extraction. The extract must be 35 percent alcohol to
meet FDA standards.1 These are the minimum requirements. Additional
alcohol content is allowed and results in a deeper, richer flavor.
By FDA definition, a "pure" extract means that the vanilla flavor can
only come from vanilla beans and nothing else.1 This factor draws a
definitive line between pure extract and imitation vanilla, but it
relates only to the vanilla flavor and doesn't necessarily mean that
nothing other than vanilla beans contributed to the overall product.
It's not uncommon to find vanilla extracts that contain a little sugar
or corn syrup, and this is perfectly legal because neither contributes
to that vanilla taste.
Pure vanilla extract that has no added sugar or corn syrup will last
forever, aging like a fine liqueur. The older the extract, the better
it becomes, losing any bitterness even without the help of added
sweeteners.
You can make vanilla extract at home by soaking fresh vanilla beans in
vodka or another neutral-flavored liquor. Simply split the beans,
scrape the gooey seeds into the container, then cover it, pods and
all, with your spirit of choice. It takes about two months for the
extract to mature"
Imitation Vanilla Extract
Imitation vanilla is made from artificial flavorings, which isn't
surprising. What might raise your eyebrows is that most of these
artificial flavorings come from wood byproducts, and those byproducts
can contain chemicals. People with discerning palates usually find
that imitation vanilla products have a harsh quality with a slightly
bitter aftertaste.
If you're tempted to substitute imitation vanilla for pure vanilla
extract in a recipe, you will need twice as much imitation vanilla
flavoring to match the strength of pure vanilla extract, but this
comes with a risk. Imitation vanilla is typically made with synthetic
vanillin extracted from wood pulp, so you forgo the gentle vanilla
hint that you'd get with the real deal when you opt for imitation. In
other words, pure vanilla extract packs more into less. This might be
okay if the focus of the recipe isn't its vanilla flavoring;
otherwise, you'll probably want to spend more for pure vanilla
extract."
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
dsi1
2022-01-05 23:16:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jeßus
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Currently, vanilla extract goes for about $35/pint at the warehouse stores in America. I could probably get it cheaper at a restaurant supply store. Can you show me an example of a proper extract that you use? I don't know what "proper extract" means.
I made a large batch of my own vanilla extract about 10 years ago, and
still have more than a pint left. But this link explains the
"Pure Vanilla Extract
Vanilla beans are expensive, retailing in some specialty shops for as
much as $2 to $3 each. The price of pure vanilla extract is also high,
but this can vary due to the quality of the beans used to make it. The
best vanilla beans are the products of orchids that grow only in
tropical climates. Beware of "pure" vanilla extract that seems
unusually cheap. If the bargain seems to be too good to be true, it's
probably an adulterated extract or the beans were of poor quality.
Pure vanilla extract must contain 13.35 ounces of vanilla beans per
gallon during extraction. The extract must be 35 percent alcohol to
meet FDA standards.1 These are the minimum requirements. Additional
alcohol content is allowed and results in a deeper, richer flavor.
By FDA definition, a "pure" extract means that the vanilla flavor can
only come from vanilla beans and nothing else.1 This factor draws a
definitive line between pure extract and imitation vanilla, but it
relates only to the vanilla flavor and doesn't necessarily mean that
nothing other than vanilla beans contributed to the overall product.
It's not uncommon to find vanilla extracts that contain a little sugar
or corn syrup, and this is perfectly legal because neither contributes
to that vanilla taste.
Pure vanilla extract that has no added sugar or corn syrup will last
forever, aging like a fine liqueur. The older the extract, the better
it becomes, losing any bitterness even without the help of added
sweeteners.
You can make vanilla extract at home by soaking fresh vanilla beans in
vodka or another neutral-flavored liquor. Simply split the beans,
scrape the gooey seeds into the container, then cover it, pods and
all, with your spirit of choice. It takes about two months for the
extract to mature"
Imitation Vanilla Extract
Imitation vanilla is made from artificial flavorings, which isn't
surprising. What might raise your eyebrows is that most of these
artificial flavorings come from wood byproducts, and those byproducts
can contain chemicals. People with discerning palates usually find
that imitation vanilla products have a harsh quality with a slightly
bitter aftertaste.
If you're tempted to substitute imitation vanilla for pure vanilla
extract in a recipe, you will need twice as much imitation vanilla
flavoring to match the strength of pure vanilla extract, but this
comes with a risk. Imitation vanilla is typically made with synthetic
vanillin extracted from wood pulp, so you forgo the gentle vanilla
hint that you'd get with the real deal when you opt for imitation. In
other words, pure vanilla extract packs more into less. This might be
okay if the focus of the recipe isn't its vanilla flavoring;
otherwise, you'll probably want to spend more for pure vanilla
extract."
It sounds like you don't have any experience buying or using a "proper extract." I thought so.
I did buy a quart of imitation vanilla, it sat for a while and I would occasionally sniff it to build up some courage to use it. In the end, I dumped the product because I needed that container for some vanilla beans and vodka.
Jeßus
2022-01-05 23:22:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Jeßus
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Currently, vanilla extract goes for about $35/pint at the warehouse stores in America. I could probably get it cheaper at a restaurant supply store. Can you show me an example of a proper extract that you use? I don't know what "proper extract" means.
I made a large batch of my own vanilla extract about 10 years ago, and
still have more than a pint left. But this link explains the
"Pure Vanilla Extract
Vanilla beans are expensive, retailing in some specialty shops for as
much as $2 to $3 each. The price of pure vanilla extract is also high,
but this can vary due to the quality of the beans used to make it. The
best vanilla beans are the products of orchids that grow only in
tropical climates. Beware of "pure" vanilla extract that seems
unusually cheap. If the bargain seems to be too good to be true, it's
probably an adulterated extract or the beans were of poor quality.
Pure vanilla extract must contain 13.35 ounces of vanilla beans per
gallon during extraction. The extract must be 35 percent alcohol to
meet FDA standards.1 These are the minimum requirements. Additional
alcohol content is allowed and results in a deeper, richer flavor.
By FDA definition, a "pure" extract means that the vanilla flavor can
only come from vanilla beans and nothing else.1 This factor draws a
definitive line between pure extract and imitation vanilla, but it
relates only to the vanilla flavor and doesn't necessarily mean that
nothing other than vanilla beans contributed to the overall product.
It's not uncommon to find vanilla extracts that contain a little sugar
or corn syrup, and this is perfectly legal because neither contributes
to that vanilla taste.
Pure vanilla extract that has no added sugar or corn syrup will last
forever, aging like a fine liqueur. The older the extract, the better
it becomes, losing any bitterness even without the help of added
sweeteners.
You can make vanilla extract at home by soaking fresh vanilla beans in
vodka or another neutral-flavored liquor. Simply split the beans,
scrape the gooey seeds into the container, then cover it, pods and
all, with your spirit of choice. It takes about two months for the
extract to mature"
Imitation Vanilla Extract
Imitation vanilla is made from artificial flavorings, which isn't
surprising. What might raise your eyebrows is that most of these
artificial flavorings come from wood byproducts, and those byproducts
can contain chemicals. People with discerning palates usually find
that imitation vanilla products have a harsh quality with a slightly
bitter aftertaste.
If you're tempted to substitute imitation vanilla for pure vanilla
extract in a recipe, you will need twice as much imitation vanilla
flavoring to match the strength of pure vanilla extract, but this
comes with a risk. Imitation vanilla is typically made with synthetic
vanillin extracted from wood pulp, so you forgo the gentle vanilla
hint that you'd get with the real deal when you opt for imitation. In
other words, pure vanilla extract packs more into less. This might be
okay if the focus of the recipe isn't its vanilla flavoring;
otherwise, you'll probably want to spend more for pure vanilla
extract."
It sounds like you don't have any experience buying or using a "proper extract." I thought so.
That's right, I bothered to make my own vanilla extract, because I
never bought or used vanilla extract previously. Makes perfect sense.

It's OK. I thought I'd just try to accept your question on face value
for a change. No real harm done, at least I didn't get called "pal".
Arnie
2022-01-05 23:24:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Jeßus
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Currently, vanilla extract goes for about $35/pint at the warehouse stores in America. I could probably get it cheaper at a restaurant supply store. Can you show me an example of a proper extract that you use? I don't know what "proper extract" means.
I made a large batch of my own vanilla extract about 10 years ago, and
still have more than a pint left. But this link explains the
"Pure Vanilla Extract
Vanilla beans are expensive, retailing in some specialty shops for as
much as $2 to $3 each. The price of pure vanilla extract is also high,
but this can vary due to the quality of the beans used to make it. The
best vanilla beans are the products of orchids that grow only in
tropical climates. Beware of "pure" vanilla extract that seems
unusually cheap. If the bargain seems to be too good to be true, it's
probably an adulterated extract or the beans were of poor quality.
Pure vanilla extract must contain 13.35 ounces of vanilla beans per
gallon during extraction. The extract must be 35 percent alcohol to
meet FDA standards.1 These are the minimum requirements. Additional
alcohol content is allowed and results in a deeper, richer flavor.
By FDA definition, a "pure" extract means that the vanilla flavor can
only come from vanilla beans and nothing else.1 This factor draws a
definitive line between pure extract and imitation vanilla, but it
relates only to the vanilla flavor and doesn't necessarily mean that
nothing other than vanilla beans contributed to the overall product.
It's not uncommon to find vanilla extracts that contain a little sugar
or corn syrup, and this is perfectly legal because neither contributes
to that vanilla taste.
Pure vanilla extract that has no added sugar or corn syrup will last
forever, aging like a fine liqueur. The older the extract, the better
it becomes, losing any bitterness even without the help of added
sweeteners.
You can make vanilla extract at home by soaking fresh vanilla beans in
vodka or another neutral-flavored liquor. Simply split the beans,
scrape the gooey seeds into the container, then cover it, pods and
all, with your spirit of choice. It takes about two months for the
extract to mature"
Imitation Vanilla Extract
Imitation vanilla is made from artificial flavorings, which isn't
surprising. What might raise your eyebrows is that most of these
artificial flavorings come from wood byproducts, and those byproducts
can contain chemicals. People with discerning palates usually find
that imitation vanilla products have a harsh quality with a slightly
bitter aftertaste.
If you're tempted to substitute imitation vanilla for pure vanilla
extract in a recipe, you will need twice as much imitation vanilla
flavoring to match the strength of pure vanilla extract, but this
comes with a risk. Imitation vanilla is typically made with synthetic
vanillin extracted from wood pulp, so you forgo the gentle vanilla
hint that you'd get with the real deal when you opt for imitation. In
other words, pure vanilla extract packs more into less. This might be
okay if the focus of the recipe isn't its vanilla flavoring;
otherwise, you'll probably want to spend more for pure vanilla
extract."
It sounds like you don't have any experience buying or using a "proper extract." I thought so.
I did buy a quart of imitation vanilla, it sat for a while and I would occasionally sniff it to build up some courage to use it. In the end, I dumped the product because I needed that container for some vanilla beans and vodka.
This is my frogger.
Arnie
2022-01-05 23:12:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Currently, vanilla extract goes for about $35/pint at the warehouse stores in America. I could probably get it cheaper at a restaurant supply store. Can you show me an example of a proper extract that you use? I don't know what "proper extract" means.
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Arnie
2022-01-05 23:05:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Maybe it was artificial vanilla which is made from the ass end of a
beaver. You probably can buy a gallon for 6$. Some say it works in
baking about the same. Odd though that the ass end of a beaver could
taste anything like vanilla.:)
Well, to a meat eater... I'm not surprised. Y'all eat lots of ass.
dsi1
2022-01-05 23:09:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Maybe it was artificial vanilla which is made from the ass end of a
beaver. You probably can buy a gallon for 6$. Some say it works in
baking about the same. Odd though that the ass end of a beaver could
taste anything like vanilla.:)
My guess is that you guys are kind of clueless about a lot of things and just like to talk out of your ass. I have bought a quart of imitation vanilla for dirt cheap but never used it. My guess is you have some experience with imitation vanilla or the ass end of a beaver - but yoose don't have to brag about it.
Arnie
2022-01-05 23:12:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Maybe it was artificial vanilla which is made from the ass end of a
beaver. You probably can buy a gallon for 6$. Some say it works in
baking about the same. Odd though that the ass end of a beaver could
taste anything like vanilla.:)
My guess is that you guys are kind of clueless about a lot of things and just like to talk out of your ass. I have bought a quart of imitation vanilla for dirt cheap but never used it. My guess is you have some experience with imitation vanilla or the ass end of a beaver - but yoose don't have to brag about it.
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Arnie
2022-01-05 23:11:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Arnie
2022-01-05 23:11:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by dsi1
I used to buy pints of vanilla extract at Costco for 6 bucks.
Ummm...no.
Okay, it was $6.99 for a pint - cut me a break, man!
https://groups.google.com/g/rec.food.cooking/c/ZWQrTsNMgyA/m/XLxBQKUhhVQJ
No way you could buy a pint of proper extract for 6 of *any* currency,
anywhere.
You think therefore it is.
Can you show me an example? Vanilla beans ain't cheap (although prices
vary depending on quality). I just can't see how real extract can be
sold retail that cheaply.
Maybe it was artificial vanilla which is made from the ass end of a
beaver. You probably can buy a gallon for 6$. Some say it works in
baking about the same. Odd though that the ass end of a beaver could
taste anything like vanilla.:)
Dit is mijn kikker. Ghe Ghe Ghe.
songbird
2022-01-05 23:21:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
dsi1 wrote:
...
Post by dsi1
You think therefore it is.
we used to have friends who'd get it from Mexico for us
by the fifth. we're still working on the last bottle.
when it runs out i'll be heartbroken because nothing else
tastes as good to me.

sadly times have changed.


songbird
dsi1
2022-01-05 23:46:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by songbird
...
Post by dsi1
You think therefore it is.
we used to have friends who'd get it from Mexico for us
by the fifth. we're still working on the last bottle.
when it runs out i'll be heartbroken because nothing else
tastes as good to me.
sadly times have changed.
songbird
Times have changed. So much so that people can't believe the simplest of things about the past. My step-mom showed me jar filled with saffron for Sweden. I couldn't believe it!
dsi1
2022-01-06 00:56:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
A friend from Texas brought be a half litre of Mexican vanilla extract.
I loved it but my wife hated it. We ended up giving it to her cousin, a
true foodie who loved it. Looking back, I wish I had kept it and she
could simply not eat the things I used it in.
That sounds like a plan to me. Well, it would have been a good plan anyway.
Here's a picture of a pint of vanilla. My daughter's making a sweet potato pie so it was brought out. That's an old bottle! She also has a jar of vanilla bean paste.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/8ih9WzvVB2ELM2xK9

Graham
2022-01-05 16:15:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I'm always too cheap for real vanilla.  The itty bitty bottles cost so
much... a large bottle of artificial vanilla costs less than half of
what the itty bitty bottles go for.
I tried the imitation once. Twice as much but not near as good.
I rarely make desert food though so even a tiny bottle of extract lasts
me for years. For those rare times, the real stuff *IS* much better and
worth the extra cost.
If I did deserts all the time, I would try the make your own but that
can be pretty expensive to start with.
FSVO "fairly expensive", but not mine.
I make my own vanilla essence using 2 vanilla pods to a small glass
bottle with metal screw cap, and the tail-end of whatever alcohol
bottle was nearly finished. I've made vanilla essence with left-over
sherry, brandy, and vodka.(In UK, salted "cooking alcohol" does not
exist. I use the ends of bottles of good, drinkable alcohol we (almost)
drunk)
The one-serve 5cl glass alcohol/spirits bottle size, served on
aircraft or in hotel room-bars are perfect. I save the empties.
2 vanilla beans. Use a knife to split them lengthways (leave seeds
inside) and feed them into the clean empty bottle. If the beans are too
long, just cut them and stuff them in to fit. Fill the bottle to the
neck with booze and seal.
Put the bottle in a cool dark place. Up-end it and shake it once a
month for 6 months to distribute the vanilla into the alcohol. I write
a reminder on the household diary on the first of every month.
At the end of 6 months the result is a vanilla essence so concentrated
and powerful you're never likely to use more than a teaspoonful in any
recipe, and many need less. This quantity usually lasts our use for a
year.
Every 6 months or so I start a new batch. A bottle of home-made
vanilla essence is a great little gift for friends who cook.
Janet UK
I make mine with vodka using the pods after the seeds have been
extracted for a recipe. However, I do use a somewhat larger bottle.
Bruce 7
2022-01-05 18:41:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I'm always too cheap for real vanilla.  The itty bitty bottles cost so
much... a large bottle of artificial vanilla costs less than half of
what the itty bitty bottles go for.
I tried the imitation once. Twice as much but not near as good.
I rarely make desert food though so even a tiny bottle of extract lasts
me for years. For those rare times, the real stuff *IS* much better and
worth the extra cost.
If I did deserts all the time, I would try the make your own but that
can be pretty expensive to start with.
FSVO "fairly expensive", but not mine.
I make my own vanilla essence using 2 vanilla pods to a small glass
bottle with metal screw cap, and the tail-end of whatever alcohol
bottle was nearly finished. I've made vanilla essence with left-over
sherry, brandy, and vodka.(In UK, salted "cooking alcohol" does not
exist. I use the ends of bottles of good, drinkable alcohol we (almost)
drunk)
The one-serve 5cl glass alcohol/spirits bottle size, served on
aircraft or in hotel room-bars are perfect. I save the empties.
2 vanilla beans. Use a knife to split them lengthways (leave seeds
inside) and feed them into the clean empty bottle. If the beans are too
long, just cut them and stuff them in to fit. Fill the bottle to the
neck with booze and seal.
Put the bottle in a cool dark place. Up-end it and shake it once a
month for 6 months to distribute the vanilla into the alcohol. I write
a reminder on the household diary on the first of every month.
At the end of 6 months the result is a vanilla essence so concentrated
and powerful you're never likely to use more than a teaspoonful in any
recipe, and many need less. This quantity usually lasts our use for a
year.
Every 6 months or so I start a new batch. A bottle of home-made
vanilla essence is a great little gift for friends who cook.
Janet UK
Ghe Ghe Ghe

This is my frogger.
Bruce 9
2022-01-05 19:32:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 15:06:47 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by songbird
....
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Michael Trew
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca. What recipe do you use? That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.
yes, all i do is reduce sugar by about 1/4-1/3 and use a
good vanilla.
I'm always too cheap for real vanilla. The itty bitty bottles cost so
much... a large bottle of artificial vanilla costs less than half of
what the itty bitty bottles go for.
I'm going to take an ancient bottle of vodka that was my grandfathers,
and make home made vanilla extract in it from split dried vanilla beans.
Those beans are also pricy, but for a 1.5 - 2 qt or so of better than
store bought extract (so I've heard), it's worth that cost for sure. It
might even end up costing less than the equivalent amount of fake vanilla.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Bruce 4
2022-01-04 20:06:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 12:12:46 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
Post by Michael Trew
Post by songbird
Post by Gary
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
tapioca pudding is a more recent
thing that i enjoy (instead of sweeter and heavier puddings i like
it in the hot part of the summer the best). now that it has
gotten colder out i no longer have a craving for this. hmmm...
funny... :)
songbird
Ooh, I've never had homemade tapioca. What recipe do you use? That
sounds good!
Get a box of Minit Tapioca and use the recipe on the box.
It's pretty easy. Mix the tapioca, sugar, milk and eff and let it sit
for about 10 minutes. Then heat it up and bring it to a boil stirring
constantly. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. If you want a lighter
texture you can separate the eggs and beat the whites and then fold them
in quickly when you take it off the heat.
I prefer the pearl tapioca but it is more complicated because you have
to soak the tapioca for a while before cooking, and it takes longer to
cook it up. It is well worth the extra work.
Thanks, I'll have to look into that. I've had store bought prepared
tapioca, which is OK, but I feel like either of those options would be
better.
Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
songbird
2022-01-03 22:38:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Dave Smith wrote:
...
I have never understood why so many people dislike tapioca pudding. I
can see that they might find it a little bland, but it's not like there
is any strong or tart flavour to turn people off. I have always liked
it. It's very hard to find pearl tapioca these days so I have to settle
for minute.
minute is all i can find here, but i don't do the shopping
so what we get is fine with me. i have the recipe all dialed
in for our microwave so it's pretty easy to make.

i like it as a lower calorie and less sweet version of
canned vanilla or canned tapioca puddings, both of which
i do like as a change of pace, but now that i can make my
own it's pretty unlikely i'll buy any more. good vanilla
is the ingredient i notice the most.


songbird
Bruce
2022-01-04 01:20:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by songbird
...
I have never understood why so many people dislike tapioca pudding. I
can see that they might find it a little bland, but it's not like there
is any strong or tart flavour to turn people off. I have always liked
it. It's very hard to find pearl tapioca these days so I have to settle
for minute.
minute is all i can find here, but i don't do the shopping
so what we get is fine with me. i have the recipe all dialed
in for our microwave so it's pretty easy to make.
i like it as a lower calorie and less sweet version of
canned vanilla or canned tapioca puddings, both of which
i do like as a change of pace, but now that i can make my
own it's pretty unlikely i'll buy any more. good vanilla
is the ingredient i notice the most.
songbird
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Bruce
2022-01-02 17:58:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only boil
2-4 eggs at a time.  I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I wouldn't
want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't have any
other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
That's a very original way to use eggs.
Bruce
2022-01-02 18:41:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
That's a very original way to use eggs.
What, no whining about killing baby chickens?
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Bruce
2022-01-02 19:06:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
That's a very original way to use eggs.
What, no whining about killing baby chickens?
Well, they would have been tortured factory chickens of course, but
I'm getting used to the total lack of empathy among North Americans.
Bryan Simmons
2022-01-02 21:18:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
That's a very original way to use eggs.
What, no whining about killing baby chickens?
Even though eggs for sale are unfertilized, an old friend who had
briefly worked in an egg processing plant called them "chicken
abortions."

--Bryan
Michael Trew
2022-01-02 23:36:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only
boil 2-4 eggs at a time. I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I
wouldn't want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't
have any other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
If I found them for that price, I'd probably do the same, and eat eggs
more often. The price on eggs varies, but for a Large Dozen, it's
typically $1.50, and easily $2+ for an 18 count.
Sheldon Martin
2022-01-03 02:06:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 18:36:36 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only
boil 2-4 eggs at a time. I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I
wouldn't want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't
have any other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
If I found them for that price, I'd probably do the same, and eat eggs
more often. The price on eggs varies, but for a Large Dozen, it's
typically $1.50, and easily $2+ for an 18 count.
Here an 18 count of large is usually $1.20, I buy 2 cartons, lasts 2
weeks. Sometimes they have peewee eggs on sale, a dozen for 49¢, two
equal one large. There are several chicken/egg farms here. Egg
shells go into our composting bucket.
Michael Trew
2022-01-03 17:11:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 18:36:36 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only
boil 2-4 eggs at a time. I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I
wouldn't want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't
have any other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
If I found them for that price, I'd probably do the same, and eat eggs
more often. The price on eggs varies, but for a Large Dozen, it's
typically $1.50, and easily $2+ for an 18 count.
Here an 18 count of large is usually $1.20, I buy 2 cartons, lasts 2
weeks. Sometimes they have peewee eggs on sale, a dozen for 49¢, two
equal one large. There are several chicken/egg farms here. Egg
shells go into our composting bucket.
That must be supply/demand. It wasn't long ago that they cost a dollar
per dozen. The price swings, but it's gradually gone up. Maybe
backyard chickens next year... lol
Ed Pawlowski
2022-01-03 17:44:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 18:36:36 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only
boil 2-4 eggs at a time.  I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I
wouldn't want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't
have any other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
If I found them for that price, I'd probably do the same, and eat eggs
more often.  The price on eggs varies, but for a Large Dozen, it's
typically $1.50, and easily $2+ for an 18 count.
Here an 18 count of large is usually $1.20, I buy 2 cartons, lasts 2
weeks.  Sometimes they have peewee eggs on sale, a dozen for 49¢, two
equal one large.  There are several chicken/egg farms here.  Egg
shells go into our composting bucket.
That must be supply/demand.  It wasn't long ago that they cost a dollar
per dozen.  The price swings, but it's gradually gone up.  Maybe
backyard chickens next year... lol
Cheapest I see these days is $1.75 to $2.00. A year ago they were much
cheaper. Still a good value compared to other protein.
Bruce 1
2022-01-04 04:10:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 18:36:36 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only
boil 2-4 eggs at a time.  I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I
wouldn't want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't
have any other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
If I found them for that price, I'd probably do the same, and eat eggs
more often.  The price on eggs varies, but for a Large Dozen, it's
typically $1.50, and easily $2+ for an 18 count.
Here an 18 count of large is usually $1.20, I buy 2 cartons, lasts 2
weeks.  Sometimes they have peewee eggs on sale, a dozen for 49¢, two
equal one large.  There are several chicken/egg farms here.  Egg
shells go into our composting bucket.
That must be supply/demand.  It wasn't long ago that they cost a dollar
per dozen.  The price swings, but it's gradually gone up.  Maybe
backyard chickens next year... lol
Cheapest I see these days is $1.75 to $2.00. A year ago they were much
cheaper. Still a good value compared to other protein.
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe. This is my frogger. Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
Bruce 3
2022-01-04 18:07:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 12:11:32 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 18:36:36 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Unless I'm making deviled eggs for a holiday or Easter eggs, I only
boil 2-4 eggs at a time. I only buy a dozen eggs at once, and I
wouldn't want them all hard or soft boiled, because then I wouldn't
have any other eggs to cook, for a recipe, etc.
I buy a tray of 30 large eggs for $1.99 every 4-5 weeks or so. I cook
them in various ways plus keep some handy for recipes that call for an egg.
If I found them for that price, I'd probably do the same, and eat eggs
more often. The price on eggs varies, but for a Large Dozen, it's
typically $1.50, and easily $2+ for an 18 count.
Here an 18 count of large is usually $1.20, I buy 2 cartons, lasts 2
weeks. Sometimes they have peewee eggs on sale, a dozen for 49¢, two
equal one large. There are several chicken/egg farms here. Egg
shells go into our composting bucket.
That must be supply/demand. It wasn't long ago that they cost a dollar
per dozen. The price swings, but it's gradually gone up. Maybe
backyard chickens next year... lol
Uhm, Ghe Ghe Ghe.
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 19:23:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:30:42 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I have a 1-quart that I use for making browned butter and a few other
things in small quantity.
Cindy Hamilton
Yes, it's nice for that, melting butter, etc. I find it hard to believe
that Sheldon really has no other use for a 1 qt saucepan, other than as
a scoop. I'd hate to have to wash out a huge pot just for something
small like that.
How is a 2 qt pot too small for melting butter?
You mean too large?
and I have large hands, I find it easier to wash a 2 qt pot than a 1
qt pot.
If I need to melt a stick or a half of a stick of butter for a recipe,
such as the shortbread cookies that Cindy posted, I wouldn't want to
deal with a larger pot.

A one quart pot is perfect to make a quick gravy or sauce for something,
if I'm only cooking for one or two, and not making a large meal or
casserole.
Michael Trew
2022-01-01 01:28:44 UTC
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Some of the ceramic lined pans have stayed nice, but some haven't. Overall, I figure they were mostly a mistake. I bought a new set of stainless steel ones today.
https://www.t-falusa.com/Cookware/Pots-%26-Pans/Expert-Clad-Tri-Ply-10-Pc-Cookware-set-/p/2100119646
--Bryan
Doesn't give the price. Looks nice but it's small for a Dutch oven.
Clearance. 70% off.
Looks like it was $69 or so, hard to see from the photo. If that was
the before price, that's a good deal!
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