Discussion:
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
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US Janet
2021-11-23 01:09:10 UTC
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Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.

So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.

Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.

Baking Powder Is The Foolproof Approach To The Best Scrambled Eggs
Baking powder is a dry chemical leavening agent. The mixture typically
contains baking soda, cream of tartar (dry acid), and occasionally
cornstarch. A familiar pantry staple, it is commonly used to improve
volume and texture in various baked goods.

Baking powder releases carbon dioxide into batter via an acid-base
reaction, causing bubbles in the batter to expand and leaven the
mixture. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to
eggs alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancakes.

All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.

However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.

How To Add Baking Powder To Scrambled Eggs
The addition of baking powder to scrambled eggs isn’t rocket science,
but thereare some practical tips. It is possible to add too much of
this unconventional additive, which could lead to a chemical
aftertaste.

Thus, it is best to be more conservative about how much you add.
Approximately one-eighth of a teaspoon is all you need to add when
scrambling two large eggs. With just a touch of baking powder, eggs
transform into a mouthwatering diner classic.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/why-you-need-to-start-adding-baking-powder-to-your-scrambled-eggs-asa
Janet US
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-23 01:34:56 UTC
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Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
Baking Powder Is The Foolproof Approach To The Best Scrambled Eggs
Baking powder is a dry chemical leavening agent. The mixture typically
contains baking soda, cream of tartar (dry acid), and occasionally
cornstarch. A familiar pantry staple, it is commonly used to improve
volume and texture in various baked goods.
Baking powder releases carbon dioxide into batter via an acid-base
reaction, causing bubbles in the batter to expand and leaven the
mixture. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to
eggs alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancakes.
All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.
However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.
How To Add Baking Powder To Scrambled Eggs
The addition of baking powder to scrambled eggs isn’t rocket science,
but thereare some practical tips. It is possible to add too much of
this unconventional additive, which could lead to a chemical
aftertaste.
Thus, it is best to be more conservative about how much you add.
Approximately one-eighth of a teaspoon is all you need to add when
scrambling two large eggs. With just a touch of baking powder, eggs
transform into a mouthwatering diner classic.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/why-you-need-to-start-adding-baking-powder-to-your-scrambled-eggs-asa
The best results come not from adding baking powder, but by
separating the eggs, beating the whites with a tiny bit of added
water, and folding in the yolks as soon as the whites begin to
gel from the heat. Both dairy and baking powder alter the taste.
Even without separating the eggs, adding a little water improves
scrambled eggs.

Still, nothing rivals a perfectly basted egg, basted in bacon grease
or clarified butter, and by perfectly basted I mean 100% solid white,
with no browning, and a yolk that is liquid.
Post by US Janet
Janet US
--Bryan
Bruce
2021-11-23 01:51:17 UTC
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
The best results come not from adding baking powder, but by
separating the eggs, beating the whites
I read 'wives', probably because I knew who the author was.
Ophelia
2021-11-23 01:55:17 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
The best results come not from adding baking powder, but by
separating the eggs, beating the whites
I read 'wives', probably because I knew who the author was.
That old Shakespeare classic spiced up a bit as "Beating the Merry Wives of Windsor"?
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-23 02:07:48 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
The best results come not from adding baking powder, but by
separating the eggs, beating the whites
I read 'wives', probably because I knew who the author was.
Whatever other faults you might find in me, I have no desire to ever
harm a woman's body, and never have.

--Bryan
Bruce
2021-11-23 02:13:02 UTC
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 18:07:48 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
The best results come not from adding baking powder, but by
separating the eggs, beating the whites
I read 'wives', probably because I knew who the author was.
Whatever other faults you might find in me, I have no desire to ever
harm a woman's body, and never have.
Congratulations, just John then. I guess that makes you sane.
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-23 09:48:37 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 18:07:48 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
The best results come not from adding baking powder, but by
separating the eggs, beating the whites
I read 'wives', probably because I knew who the author was.
Whatever other faults you might find in me, I have no desire to ever
harm a woman's body, and never have.
Congratulations, just John then. I guess that makes you sane.
It's no wonder the Nazis just marched right in.

--Bryan
Bruce
2021-11-23 10:05:02 UTC
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2021 01:48:37 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 18:07:48 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
The best results come not from adding baking powder, but by
separating the eggs, beating the whites
I read 'wives', probably because I knew who the author was.
Whatever other faults you might find in me, I have no desire to ever
harm a woman's body, and never have.
Congratulations, just John then. I guess that makes you sane.
It's no wonder the Nazis just marched right in.
Good, I pressed a psycho's button. Now he's trying to be mean. And he
fails :)
Hank Rogers
2021-11-23 02:12:52 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
The best results come not from adding baking powder, but by
separating the eggs, beating the whites
I read 'wives', probably because I knew who the author was.
I read 'beating', and thought it was you and your dik beating
minion kuth.
US Janet
2021-11-23 03:11:28 UTC
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
<***@gmail.com> wrote:
snip
Post by US Janet
scrambled eggs.
Still, nothing rivals a perfectly basted egg, basted in bacon grease
or clarified butter, and by perfectly basted I mean 100% solid white,
with no browning, and a yolk that is liquid.
Post by US Janet
Janet US
--Bryan
I agree with that totally
Janet US
Bruce
2021-11-23 03:44:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:34:56 -0800 (PST), Bryan Simmons
snip
Post by US Janet
scrambled eggs.
Still, nothing rivals a perfectly basted egg, basted in bacon grease
or clarified butter, and by perfectly basted I mean 100% solid white,
with no browning, and a yolk that is liquid.
Post by US Janet
Janet US
--Bryan
I agree with that totally
Janet US
Maybe Ted Bundy cooked really nice eggs too.
jmcquown
2021-11-23 01:45:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
Baking Powder Is The Foolproof Approach To The Best Scrambled Eggs
Baking powder is a dry chemical leavening agent. The mixture typically
contains baking soda, cream of tartar (dry acid), and occasionally
cornstarch. A familiar pantry staple, it is commonly used to improve
volume and texture in various baked goods.
Baking powder releases carbon dioxide into batter via an acid-base
reaction, causing bubbles in the batter to expand and leaven the
mixture. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to
eggs alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancakes.
All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.
However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.
How To Add Baking Powder To Scrambled Eggs
The addition of baking powder to scrambled eggs isn’t rocket science,
but thereare some practical tips. It is possible to add too much of
this unconventional additive, which could lead to a chemical
aftertaste.
Thus, it is best to be more conservative about how much you add.
Approximately one-eighth of a teaspoon is all you need to add when
scrambling two large eggs. With just a touch of baking powder, eggs
transform into a mouthwatering diner classic.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/why-you-need-to-start-adding-baking-powder-to-your-scrambled-eggs-asa
Janet US
Interesting, but I've never really had a problem with making nice fluffy
light good tasting scrambled eggs. I know some folks complain
complained about scrambled eggs (or omelets) being cooked too hard or
too dry. IMH, you have to know your stove and your cookware. This
baking soda tip might help some people, though. :)

Jill
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-23 02:58:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
Baking Powder Is The Foolproof Approach To The Best Scrambled Eggs
Baking powder is a dry chemical leavening agent. The mixture typically
contains baking soda, cream of tartar (dry acid), and occasionally
cornstarch. A familiar pantry staple, it is commonly used to improve
volume and texture in various baked goods.
Baking powder releases carbon dioxide into batter via an acid-base
reaction, causing bubbles in the batter to expand and leaven the
mixture. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to
eggs alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancakes.
All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.
However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.
How To Add Baking Powder To Scrambled Eggs
The addition of baking powder to scrambled eggs isn’t rocket science,
but thereare some practical tips. It is possible to add too much of
this unconventional additive, which could lead to a chemical
aftertaste.
Thus, it is best to be more conservative about how much you add.
Approximately one-eighth of a teaspoon is all you need to add when
scrambling two large eggs. With just a touch of baking powder, eggs
transform into a mouthwatering diner classic.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/why-you-need-to-start-adding-baking-powder-to-your-scrambled-eggs-asa
Janet US
Interesting, but I've never really had a problem with making nice fluffy
light good tasting scrambled eggs.  I know some folks complain
complained about scrambled eggs (or omelets) being cooked too hard or
too dry.  IMH, you have to know your stove and your cookware.  This
baking soda tip might help some people, though. :)
Jill
I may try it someday just to see if it does anything. I've played with
mayo with good results but also, just plain eggs and salt works well if
cooked on the slow side and stirred as they cook. I often add cheese.

Teflon pan with a good coating of butter and moderate heat seems more
critical than additives.
jmcquown
2021-11-23 03:10:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
Baking Powder Is The Foolproof Approach To The Best Scrambled Eggs
Baking powder is a dry chemical leavening agent. The mixture typically
contains baking soda, cream of tartar (dry acid), and occasionally
cornstarch. A familiar pantry staple, it is commonly used to improve
volume and texture in various baked goods.
Baking powder releases carbon dioxide into batter via an acid-base
reaction, causing bubbles in the batter to expand and leaven the
mixture. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to
eggs alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancakes.
All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.
However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.
How To Add Baking Powder To Scrambled Eggs
The addition of baking powder to scrambled eggs isn’t rocket science,
but thereare some practical tips. It is possible to add too much of
this unconventional additive, which could lead to a chemical
aftertaste.
Thus, it is best to be more conservative about how much you add.
Approximately one-eighth of a teaspoon is all you need to add when
scrambling two large eggs. With just a touch of baking powder, eggs
transform into a mouthwatering diner classic.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/why-you-need-to-start-adding-baking-powder-to-your-scrambled-eggs-asa
Janet US
Interesting, but I've never really had a problem with making nice
fluffy light good tasting scrambled eggs.  I know some folks complain
complained about scrambled eggs (or omelets) being cooked too hard or
too dry.  IMH, you have to know your stove and your cookware.  This
baking soda tip might help some people, though. :)
Jill
I may try it someday just to see if it does anything.  I've played with
mayo with good results but also, just plain eggs and salt works well if
cooked on the slow side and stirred as they cook.  I often add cheese.
Teflon pan with a good coating of butter and moderate heat seems more
critical than additives.
Yep, a good non-stick pan with butter and moderate heat works well for
me. I never did try the adding mayo thing. I had good intentions when
it came up but frankly I forgot all about it. Ooops! I do add
different types of cheeses, but not always. I season with S&P towards
the end of cooking the eggs. Constantly taking it on and off the heat
like Ramsay does, no. I cook eggs on low heat and keep stirring with
the non-stick spatula and remove from the heat when the eggs are still
quite soft. I have never added creme fraiche or sour cream to scrambled
eggs, not even to an egg casserole. I know I've never added baking soda
but can't discount the suggestion.

Jill
US Janet
2021-11-23 03:14:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by jmcquown
Post by US Janet
snip
https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/why-you-need-to-start-adding-baking-powder-to-your-scrambled-eggs-asa
Janet US
Interesting, but I've never really had a problem with making nice fluffy
light good tasting scrambled eggs. I know some folks complain
complained about scrambled eggs (or omelets) being cooked too hard or
too dry. IMH, you have to know your stove and your cookware. This
baking soda tip might help some people, though. :)
Jill
I thought it would be interesting for discussion
Janet US
jmcquown
2021-11-23 03:15:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Post by jmcquown
Post by US Janet
snip
https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/why-you-need-to-start-adding-baking-powder-to-your-scrambled-eggs-asa
Janet US
Interesting, but I've never really had a problem with making nice fluffy
light good tasting scrambled eggs. I know some folks complain
complained about scrambled eggs (or omelets) being cooked too hard or
too dry. IMH, you have to know your stove and your cookware. This
baking soda tip might help some people, though. :)
Jill
I thought it would be interesting for discussion
Janet US
It is, thanks!

Jill
Mike Duffy
2021-11-23 03:29:17 UTC
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I thought it would be interesting for discussion Janet US
It was. I have suggested to use baking soda, which I experimented with in
the past. I figured if it left any taste, it would be pretty much pure
sodium (salty). I should try some eggs side by side (baking soda & baking
powder) to verify which is better.

For sure, you can do as Bryan says, but that seems like a of work
compared to whisking in some powder.

Incidentally, it occurs to me that one might be able to use a
'SodaStream' (tm) to diffuse CO2 directly into eggs, but that could end
up with a class II mess in the kitchen. But at least it would not be as
dangerous as the superheated / exploding eggs I documented previously.
Dave Smith
2021-11-23 03:53:54 UTC
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Janet US
Post by US Janet
Post by jmcquown
Interesting, but I've never really had a problem with making nice fluffy
light good tasting scrambled eggs. I know some folks complain
complained about scrambled eggs (or omelets) being cooked too hard or
too dry. IMH, you have to know your stove and your cookware. This
baking soda tip might help some people, though. :)
Jill
I thought it would be interesting for discussion
There are a lot of factors involved in the way scrambled eggs turn. It
can be using milk, water, cream, sour cream, no added liquid or fat, the
type of pan, the heat of the fan, the amount and type of fat you use,
how vigorously you beat the eggs, whether or not you stir them
immediately, if you stir them slowly or vigorously and how much you cook
them.

People can be pretty particular about how they like their eggs.
I like mine wet. I start off heating up a pan and while it's heating I
whip up the eggs in a bowl with a little salt and pepper. I add a little
butter and let it brown a bit then the eggs go it and wait a bit before
stirring and just sort of fold then a couple times until there real
liquid is gone and then get them off before they get dry.

Most times I add some hot sauce to the eggs... after they have been
beaten. Then I toss some torn spinach into the browned butter for about
10 seconds before adding the eggs.
Mike Duffy
2021-11-23 14:24:51 UTC
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Post by Dave Smith
There are a lot of factors involved in the way scrambled eggs turn. It
can be using milk, water, cream, sour cream, no added liquid or fat, the
type of pan, the heat of the fan, the amount and type of fat you use,
how vigorously you beat the eggs, whether or not you stir them
immediately, if you stir them slowly or vigorously and how much you cook
them.
Bryan has you beat for being overly complicated. He separates the yolks
and performs different stuff as above on the components before mixing
them back together.

But no matter what complications you wish to perform, you cannot make
them fluff up as much as by adding a couple grams of baking powder or
baking soda. I believe that was the point Janet US was trying to make.

For sure, that will affect taste, but so will all the above noted rituals.

I am planning to perform a side-by-side comparison (BP vs. BS) presently,
so stay tuned.
Dave Smith
2021-11-23 15:21:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Dave Smith
There are a lot of factors involved in the way scrambled eggs turn. It
can be using milk, water, cream, sour cream, no added liquid or fat, the
type of pan, the heat of the fan, the amount and type of fat you use,
how vigorously you beat the eggs, whether or not you stir them
immediately, if you stir them slowly or vigorously and how much you cook
them.
Bryan has you beat for being overly complicated. He separates the yolks
and performs different stuff as above on the components before mixing
them back together.
But no matter what complications you wish to perform, you cannot make
them fluff up as much as by adding a couple grams of baking powder or
baking soda. I believe that was the point Janet US was trying to make.
For sure, that will affect taste, but so will all the above noted rituals.
I am planning to perform a side-by-side comparison (BP vs. BS) presently,
so stay tuned.
Why on Earth would anyone even want fluffy scrambled eggs? If I wanted
fluffy I would so a souffle or just eat meringue topping.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-23 15:33:02 UTC
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Post by Mike Duffy
But no matter what complications you wish to perform, you cannot make
them fluff up as much as by adding a couple grams of baking powder or
baking soda. I believe that was the point Janet US was trying to make.
For sure, that will affect taste, but so will all the above noted rituals.
I am planning to perform a side-by-side comparison (BP vs. BS) presently,
so stay tuned.
 Why on Earth would anyone even want fluffy scrambled eggs? If I wanted
fluffy I would so a souffle or just eat meringue topping.
Perhaps it comes down to definition. I want them a light texture but
not meringue light. I often add cheese so that increases the density a bit

I have them scrambled a couple of times a week so will give it a try
just to see what happens.
Mike Duffy
2021-11-23 18:34:13 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Perhaps it comes down to definition. I want them a light texture but
not meringue light. I often add cheese so that increases the density a bit
I have them scrambled a couple of times a week so will give it a try
just to see what happens.
I just tried a side-by-side test. I used 2 ramekins, which I lined with
margarine and put an egg in each. I used about 2 cc of baking powder in
one, and 2 cc of baking soda in the other. Then I cooked them in the same
microwave oven to ensure identical cooking energy over the two samples.


The BP seems to be better for several reasons:

(1) It is much easier to see where the BP has been mixed. The BS just
disappears, and it is difficult to know how much more mixing is required
to distribute it evenly. But the BP yields an immediate white paste,
which makes unendowed regions 'clearly' evident.

(2) Each ramekin was 1/4 full with one egg. The BP egg fluffed up
quicker, and in practice I cut power when it created an overburden (above
the ramekin edge) which threatened to topple. This was repeated 3 or 4
times until I judged that the entire structure was strong enough to hold
together for 'flipping' with a tablespoon, to ensure even cooking. The BS
egg was overturned at the same time. The BS egg never attained the same
height as the BP; usually it was about 75%.

The max height of the BP egg was about 2X the ramekin height, or roughly
an 8X gain in total volume during cooking because the ramekins started at
about 1/4 full. Quiescent volume (after cooling) returned to about 2X
original in both cases.

(3) After cooking, the BS egg had a few darkish regions, reminiscent of
the purplish tone on the outside surface of overdone hard-boiled yolks. I
suspect it was simply that the BS egg was not mixed as thoroughly as the
BP egg; see note (1).


I suspect that the highest volume gain could be achieved by slowly
cooking (either via MW or traditional conduction) instead of full on MW
staggered on & off to avoid overflowing the cooking vessel. That way, the
matrix would be solidified at full extension. Perhaps adding flour could
provide such a mechanism via gluten chains, but I don't want to go too
deep into the rabbit-hole of bread-making.

As Ed said, maybe cheese could be the answer as well.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-23 18:59:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Duffy
Perhaps it comes down to definition. I want them a light texture but
not meringue light. I often add cheese so that increases the density a
bit
I have them scrambled a couple of times a week so will give it a try
just to see what happens.
I just tried a side-by-side test. I used 2 ramekins, which I lined with
margarine and put an egg in each. I used about 2 cc of baking powder in
one, and 2 cc of baking soda in the other. Then I cooked them in the same
microwave oven to ensure identical cooking energy over the two samples.
The only reason we need is that the pH of an egg is between 6.0 and 7.6.
That's not nearly acidic enough to make baking soda work.

Baking powder contains an acid and a base. When it gets wet (and warm),
the acid and base react to form carbon dioxide.

The result was a foregone conclusion.

Cindy Hamilton
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-23 19:01:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Duffy
Perhaps it comes down to definition. I want them a light texture but
not meringue light. I often add cheese so that increases the density a
bit
I have them scrambled a couple of times a week so will give it a try
just to see what happens.
I just tried a side-by-side test. I used 2 ramekins, which I lined with
margarine and put an egg in each. I used about 2 cc of baking powder in
one, and 2 cc of baking soda in the other. Then I cooked them in the same
microwave oven to ensure identical cooking energy over the two samples.
You cooked eggs in a microwave. Nothing else really matters.
This is food, not 9th grade science lab, and you cooked eggs
in a microwave.

--Bryan
US Janet
2021-11-23 19:23:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 23 Nov 2021 18:34:13 -0000 (UTC), Mike Duffy
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Perhaps it comes down to definition. I want them a light texture but
not meringue light. I often add cheese so that increases the density a bit
I have them scrambled a couple of times a week so will give it a try
just to see what happens.
I just tried a side-by-side test. I used 2 ramekins, which I lined with
margarine and put an egg in each. I used about 2 cc of baking powder in
one, and 2 cc of baking soda in the other. Then I cooked them in the same
microwave oven to ensure identical cooking energy over the two samples.
(1) It is much easier to see where the BP has been mixed. The BS just
disappears, and it is difficult to know how much more mixing is required
to distribute it evenly. But the BP yields an immediate white paste,
which makes unendowed regions 'clearly' evident.
(2) Each ramekin was 1/4 full with one egg. The BP egg fluffed up
quicker, and in practice I cut power when it created an overburden (above
the ramekin edge) which threatened to topple. This was repeated 3 or 4
times until I judged that the entire structure was strong enough to hold
together for 'flipping' with a tablespoon, to ensure even cooking. The BS
egg was overturned at the same time. The BS egg never attained the same
height as the BP; usually it was about 75%.
The max height of the BP egg was about 2X the ramekin height, or roughly
an 8X gain in total volume during cooking because the ramekins started at
about 1/4 full. Quiescent volume (after cooling) returned to about 2X
original in both cases.
(3) After cooking, the BS egg had a few darkish regions, reminiscent of
the purplish tone on the outside surface of overdone hard-boiled yolks. I
suspect it was simply that the BS egg was not mixed as thoroughly as the
BP egg; see note (1).
I suspect that the highest volume gain could be achieved by slowly
cooking (either via MW or traditional conduction) instead of full on MW
staggered on & off to avoid overflowing the cooking vessel. That way, the
matrix would be solidified at full extension. Perhaps adding flour could
provide such a mechanism via gluten chains, but I don't want to go too
deep into the rabbit-hole of bread-making.
As Ed said, maybe cheese could be the answer as well.
That experiment has no relation to what the recommendation was in
several articles
Janet US
jmcquown
2021-11-23 02:04:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
(snippage)

This isn't from Hell's Kitchen but it's Gordon Ramsay's fussy method for
making scrambled eggs. On and off the heat rather constantly.



Fun to watch but no, I don't keep creme fraiche or sour cream on hand
and wouldn't go out of my way to buy it just to scramble some eggs. It
does look tasty served on that toast, though. :)

Jill
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-23 02:14:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
(snippage)
This isn't from Hell's Kitchen but it's Gordon Ramsay's fussy method for
making scrambled eggs. On and off the heat rather constantly.
http://youtu.be/VhJFyyukAzA
Fun to watch but no, I don't keep creme fraiche or sour cream on hand
and wouldn't go out of my way to buy it just to scramble some eggs. It
does look tasty served on that toast, though. :)
Mexican sour cream is essentially creme fraiche.
https://www.lalafoods.com/english/products/lala-crema-mexicana/lala-mexican-style-sour-cream/

I wouldn't put it *in* eggs, but it's great *on* lots of things.
Post by jmcquown
Jill
--Bryan
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-23 09:42:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly.
Sure, if I wanted big, fluffy curds. But I want my scrambled
eggs to be flat. The result I'm after is also called "folded scrambled eggs".

Cindy Hamilton
Dave Smith
2021-11-23 14:57:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly.
Sure, if I wanted big, fluffy curds. But I want my scrambled
eggs to be flat. The result I'm after is also called "folded scrambled eggs".
Yep, that is how they are best, provided they are not cooked so long
they dry out. Get a dozen people together and ask them what makes the
perfect scrambled eggs and you will get a dozen different answers.
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-23 12:29:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Post by US Janet
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
Baking Powder Is The Foolproof Approach To The Best Scrambled Eggs
Baking powder is a dry chemical leavening agent. The mixture typically
contains baking soda, cream of tartar (dry acid), and occasionally
cornstarch. A familiar pantry staple, it is commonly used to improve
volume and texture in various baked goods.
Baking powder releases carbon dioxide into batter via an acid-base
reaction, causing bubbles in the batter to expand and leaven the
mixture. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to
eggs alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancakes.
All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.
However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.
How To Add Baking Powder To Scrambled Eggs
The addition of baking powder to scrambled eggs isn’t rocket science,
but thereare some practical tips. It is possible to add too much of
this unconventional additive, which could lead to a chemical
aftertaste.
Thus, it is best to be more conservative about how much you add.
Approximately one-eighth of a teaspoon is all you need to add when
scrambling two large eggs. With just a touch of baking powder, eggs
transform into a mouthwatering diner classic.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/why-you-need-to-start-adding-baking-powder-to-your-scrambled-eggs-asa
Janet US
Dave Smith
2021-11-23 15:17:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.
However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.
Not the way I like them.
songbird
2021-11-23 23:53:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
***@webtv.net wrote:
...
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
microwave does it just fine and you don't even have to
stand there and watch them at all once you know how long
for how many.


songbird
Hank Rogers
2021-11-24 00:00:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on
medium low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are
curated special shit)

No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a
while I might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.

It's just a plate of eggs.

I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens
laying brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was
needed to cook up a mess of those brown eggs either.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-24 01:03:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on medium
low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are curated
special shit)
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a while I
might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
It's just a plate of eggs.
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens laying
brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was needed to cook
up a mess of those brown eggs either.
There was a radio ad for brown eggs years ago. They sang a little jingle:
Brown eggs are local eggs and local eggs are fresh.
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-24 02:08:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on
medium low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are
curated special shit)
Same here, non-stick pan, butter, low flame on a 100% evil fossil fuel
gas stove. Pepper after the eggs are plated.
Post by Hank Rogers
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a
while I might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
Sometimes I'll add a smidge of grated cheese. Cheese that's too small
amount for anything else. But if I do spinach and scrambled eggs then
it's parmesan cheese.
Post by Hank Rogers
It's just a plate of eggs.
Yep.
Post by Hank Rogers
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens
laying brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was
needed to cook up a mess of those brown eggs either.
No hens here, but it's the same method I've used since Columbus landed.
Bruce
2021-11-24 02:15:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on
medium low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are
curated special shit)
Same here, non-stick pan, butter, low flame on a 100% evil fossil fuel
gas stove. Pepper after the eggs are plated.
Post by Hank Rogers
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a
while I might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
Sometimes I'll add a smidge of grated cheese. Cheese that's too small
amount for anything else. But if I do spinach and scrambled eggs then
it's parmesan cheese.
Post by Hank Rogers
It's just a plate of eggs.
Yep.
Post by Hank Rogers
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens
laying brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was
needed to cook up a mess of those brown eggs either.
No hens here, but it's the same method I've used since Columbus landed.
Are you saying your ancestors were European???
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-24 02:23:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
I've used since Columbus landed.
Are you saying your ancestors were European???
Of course. Not a single one was from Mars.
Bruce
2021-11-24 02:25:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by i***@webtv.net
I've used since Columbus landed.
Are you saying your ancestors were European???
Of course. Not a single one was from Mars.
Are you familiar with the Hobbits and Gollum?
Hank Rogers
2021-11-24 05:11:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on
medium low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are
curated special shit)
Same here, non-stick pan, butter, low flame on a 100% evil fossil fuel
gas stove. Pepper after the eggs are plated.
Post by Hank Rogers
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a
while I might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
Sometimes I'll add a smidge of grated cheese. Cheese that's too small
amount for anything else. But if I do spinach and scrambled eggs then
it's parmesan cheese.
Post by Hank Rogers
It's just a plate of eggs.
Yep.
Post by Hank Rogers
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens
laying brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was
needed to cook up a mess of those brown eggs either.
No hens here, but it's the same method I've used since Columbus landed.
Are you saying your ancestors were European???
Are you saying they weren't?

Or are you just sniffing?
US Janet
2021-11-24 03:29:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on
medium low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are
curated special shit)
Same here, non-stick pan, butter, low flame on a 100% evil fossil fuel
gas stove. Pepper after the eggs are plated.
Post by Hank Rogers
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a
while I might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
Sometimes I'll add a smidge of grated cheese. Cheese that's too small
amount for anything else. But if I do spinach and scrambled eggs then
it's parmesan cheese.
Post by Hank Rogers
It's just a plate of eggs.
Yep.
Post by Hank Rogers
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens
laying brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was
needed to cook up a mess of those brown eggs either.
No hens here, but it's the same method I've used since Columbus landed.
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-24 13:57:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on
medium low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are
curated special shit)
Same here, non-stick pan, butter, low flame on a 100% evil fossil fuel
gas stove. Pepper after the eggs are plated.
Post by Hank Rogers
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a
while I might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
Sometimes I'll add a smidge of grated cheese. Cheese that's too small
amount for anything else. But if I do spinach and scrambled eggs then
it's parmesan cheese.
Post by Hank Rogers
It's just a plate of eggs.
Yep.
Post by Hank Rogers
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens
laying brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was
needed to cook up a mess of those brown eggs either.
No hens here, but it's the same method I've used since Columbus landed.
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-24 19:00:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on
medium low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are
curated special shit)
Same here, non-stick pan, butter, low flame on a 100% evil fossil fuel
gas stove. Pepper after the eggs are plated.
Post by Hank Rogers
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a
while I might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
Sometimes I'll add a smidge of grated cheese. Cheese that's too small
amount for anything else. But if I do spinach and scrambled eggs then
it's parmesan cheese.
Post by Hank Rogers
It's just a plate of eggs.
Yep.
Post by Hank Rogers
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens
laying brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was
needed to cook up a mess of those brown eggs either.
No hens here, but it's the same method I've used since Columbus landed.
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
But yoose brains are scrambled, Popeye.
jmcquown
2021-11-24 19:21:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on
medium low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are
curated special shit)
Same here, non-stick pan, butter, low flame on a 100% evil fossil fuel
gas stove. Pepper after the eggs are plated.
Post by Hank Rogers
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a
while I might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
Sometimes I'll add a smidge of grated cheese. Cheese that's too small
amount for anything else. But if I do spinach and scrambled eggs then
it's parmesan cheese.
Post by Hank Rogers
It's just a plate of eggs.
Yep.
Post by Hank Rogers
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens
laying brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was
needed to cook up a mess of those brown eggs either.
No hens here, but it's the same method I've used since Columbus landed.
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
You scramble the eggs before you put them in the not buttered pan.

Jill
US Janet
2021-11-24 21:13:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
snip.
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
You scramble the eggs before you put them in the not buttered pan.
Jill
Actually, I was saying that the only time I put cheese in eggs was an
omelet (also quiche and stuff like that)
Never found a reason for them in scrambled.
Janet US
jmcquown
2021-11-24 21:24:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
snip.
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
You scramble the eggs before you put them in the not buttered pan.
Jill
Actually, I was saying that the only time I put cheese in eggs was an
omelet (also quiche and stuff like that)
Never found a reason for them in scrambled.
Janet US
Yes, I know what you were saying. But you do have to *scramble* the
eggs to make an omelet. :) I add a bit of cheese to the eggs I've
scrambled to make an omelet. Sometimes bacon, sometimes spinach. The
type of cheese varies.

Jill
Hank Rogers
2021-11-24 22:00:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Post by jmcquown
On Tue, 23 Nov 2021 20:29:15 -0700, US Janet
snip.
Post by jmcquown
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet.  Bacon, green onion,
diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
You scramble the eggs before you put them in the not buttered pan.
Jill
Actually, I was saying that the only time I put cheese in eggs was an
omelet (also quiche and stuff like that)
Never found a reason for them in scrambled.
Janet US
Yes, I know what you were saying.  But you do have to *scramble*
the eggs to make an omelet. :)  I add a bit of cheese to the eggs
I've scrambled to make an omelet.  Sometimes bacon, sometimes
spinach.  The type of cheese varies.
Jill
Sounds good to me, but then it wouldn't be a Popeye omelet, which
is arguably the finest in the universe.
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-25 15:49:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
snip.
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
You scramble the eggs before you put them in the not buttered pan.
Jill
Those would be beaten eggs (raw)... as for an omelet or scrambled.
"not buttered pan"? I think you meant HOT buttered pan.
Post by US Janet
Actually, I was saying that the only time I put cheese in eggs was an
omelet (also quiche and stuff like that)
Never found a reason for them in scrambled.
Janet US
I sometimes add grated cheese to beaten eggs for scrambled.
jmcquown
2021-11-25 15:59:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
snip.
Post by jmcquown
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
You scramble the eggs before you put them in the not buttered pan.
Jill
Those would be beaten eggs (raw)... as for an omelet or scrambled.
"not buttered pan"? I think you meant HOT buttered pan.
Yes, a typo. HOT buttered pan. As for the term scramble, semantics. I
consider beating eggs with a fork or whisk to be akin to scrambling the
egg in a bowl first. Continue stirring or pushing around the eggs in
the buttered pan to make "scrambled" eggs.
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
Actually, I was saying that the only time I put cheese in eggs was an
omelet (also quiche and stuff like that)
Never found a reason for them in scrambled.
Janet US
I sometimes add grated cheese to beaten eggs for scrambled.
Sometimes I do, most times I don't. I'm more likely to add cheese and
other ingredients if I'm making an omelet.

Jill
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-25 01:36:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only add cheese if I'm doing an omelet. Bacon, green onion, diced
tomatoes and shredded cheese.
Janet US
An omelet is not scrambled.
No where, absolutely no where did she state she was scrambling eggs. She
said she only added cheese if she was making an o.m.e.l.e.t.
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-24 13:51:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
You probably never scrambled more than two eggs and fed no more than
yourself. When feeding a family the double boiler is easiest and the
eggs are all cooked at the same time... how do you think
restaurants/hotels cook scrambled eggs? And with a double boiler
there's no constant stirring and nothing over cooks or burns. No need
for a dedicated double boiler, people who know how to cook don't own a
toys R us double boiler... it's done with a stainless steel round
bottomed mixing bowl placed in a pot of boiling water, melt a stick of
butter and add a dozen or more beaten eggs, occasional stirring with a
rubber spatula. Eggs begin to set up quickly... takes no more than
ten minutes to PERFECTLY scramble a dozen eggs... likely takes you
more than ten minutes to crack and beat a dozen eggs, and time to pick
out the egg shells. No way do I believe your wise ass can do more in
a kitchen than use a bread toaster and prepare a bowl of flakie
wakies, maybe.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-24 14:07:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
You probably never scrambled more than two eggs and fed no more than
yourself. When feeding a family the double boiler is easiest and the
eggs are all cooked at the same time... how do you think
restaurants/hotels cook scrambled eggs?
Who cares? I'm not sure I've ever cooked more than two scrambled eggs
at once. If I have, it's been more than 30 years ago.

My family is two people, and each of us prefers his/her eggs cooked a
different way.

Cindy Hamilton
jmcquown
2021-11-24 19:28:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
You probably never scrambled more than two eggs and fed no more than
yourself. When feeding a family the double boiler is easiest and the
eggs are all cooked at the same time... how do you think
restaurants/hotels cook scrambled eggs?
Who cares? I'm not sure I've ever cooked more than two scrambled eggs
at once. If I have, it's been more than 30 years ago.
My family is two people, and each of us prefers his/her eggs cooked a
different way.
Cindy Hamilton
I cannot think of the last time I ordered scrambled eggs at a hotel, if
ever. Oh wait, I do remember! It was at the restaurant in the hotel
where we stayed (for several weeks) until Dad found us a rental house in
Bangkok. That was in 1969. That was the first time I ever saw
scrambled eggs served on top of a piece of toasted bread. Did they use
a double boiler? I have NO idea. I don't know if they added baking
powder, either. ;)

Jill
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-25 01:33:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
You probably never scrambled more than two eggs and fed no more than
yourself. When feeding a family the double boiler is easiest and the
eggs are all cooked at the same time... how do you think
restaurants/hotels cook scrambled eggs?
You're so full of shit your eyes are brown. Nobody wanting to get breakfast
on the table for a hungry family ever uses a double boiler to scramble eggs.

No restaurants cooks their eggs in a double boiler either. Beside, you won't
set foot in a restaurant so now I know you haven't a clue of what you are
talking about. But how in hell did you come up with this fairy tale??
Post by Sheldon Martin
And with a double boiler
there's no constant stirring and nothing over cooks or burns. No need
for a dedicated double boiler, people who know how to cook don't own a
toys R us double boiler... it's done with a stainless steel round
bottomed mixing bowl placed in a pot of boiling water, melt a stick of
butter and add a dozen or more beaten eggs, occasional stirring with a
rubber spatula. Eggs begin to set up quickly... takes no more than
ten minutes to PERFECTLY scramble a dozen eggs...
I wish you'd learn to keep your lies straight. You've said in the past that
perfectly scrambled eggs in a double boiler takes 30 minutes of constant
stirring. Now those magic eggs only take ten minutes according to you.
Post by Sheldon Martin
No way do I believe your wise ass can do more in
a kitchen than use a bread toaster and prepare a bowl of flakie
wakies, maybe.
Just because you cooked tubs of slop on a boat years, and years, and
years ago doesn't make you an expert on cooking eggs or anything else
in the kitchen.
jmcquown
2021-11-25 14:15:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Just because you cooked tubs of slop on a boat years, and years, and
years ago doesn't make you an expert on cooking eggs or anything else
in the kitchen.
I'd be willing to bet he didn't use a double boiler when cooking eggs
for the troops on that ship. Besides, how many times has he mentioned
he cooks a dozen eggs with potatoes to make a frittata? (For just him
and his wife.) No way does he do that using a double boiler.

Jill
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-25 17:20:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by i***@webtv.net
Just because you cooked tubs of slop on a boat years, and years, and
years ago doesn't make you an expert on cooking eggs or anything else
in the kitchen.
I'd be willing to bet he didn't use a double boiler when cooking eggs
for the troops on that ship. Besides, how many times has he mentioned
he cooks a dozen eggs with potatoes to make a frittata? (For just him
and his wife.) No way does he do that using a double boiler.
Jill
Thank you.
jmcquown
2021-11-25 17:47:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by jmcquown
Post by i***@webtv.net
Just because you cooked tubs of slop on a boat years, and years, and
years ago doesn't make you an expert on cooking eggs or anything else
in the kitchen.
I'd be willing to bet he didn't use a double boiler when cooking eggs
for the troops on that ship. Besides, how many times has he mentioned
he cooks a dozen eggs with potatoes to make a frittata? (For just him
and his wife.) No way does he do that using a double boiler.
Jill
Thank you.
Even if I felt the need to cook a dozen scrambled eggs, I don't have a
double boiler large enough to accomodate it. I cook 2-3 eggs at a time.
I'm not going to boil water and put an insert over the pan (I do have
one, very old Revere Ware pans came with a double boiler thing) to cook
scrambled eggs. It's too much trouble. The scrambled eggs I make are
very tasty and much less fuss and bother. I boil water for pasta, not
for scrambled eggs.

Jill
Michael Trew
2021-11-24 17:38:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
Oh baloney. That's what those dials and knobs are for on your stove;
to regulate the temperature. Besides, who in their right mind wants
to stand stir a damn pot of eggs for 30 minutes only to be gobbled
down in 3 minutes???
Nobody, that's who.
I just use a non stick pan, butter, and a 100% electric stove on medium
low power. Often a sprinkle of pepper and salt (neither are curated
special shit)
No french words either (sorry grayham), no other ingredients used,
nothing fancy either. It works every *goddamn* time. Once in a while I
might use a splash of cream, but mostly not.
It's just a plate of eggs.
I used the same procedure years ago, when I had a few dozen hens laying
brown eggs. More than we could eat. Nothing special was needed to cook
up a mess of those brown eggs either.
If you have that many chickens/eggs, it might be better to hard boil
them in lots then refrigerate. I was glad to install a gas stove; I
don't miss the electric cook to for certain.
Michael Trew
2021-11-24 17:36:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
I'd never considered that. You're probably right, but on top of waiting
for the water to boil, that's far too much hassle.

I just beat the eggs in a bowl with a fork, and cook in a greased
skillet over medium/low heat, flipping or stirring, until soft and set.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-24 18:49:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
The best method for cooking scrambled eggs is in a double boiler,
holds the perfect stable temperature.
I'd never considered that.  You're probably right, but on top of waiting
for the water to boil, that's far too much hassle.
I just beat the eggs in a bowl with a fork, and cook in a greased
skillet over medium/low heat, flipping or stirring, until soft and set.
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.

As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
US Janet
2021-11-24 21:16:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Nov 2021 13:49:14 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <***@snet.xxx> wrote:

snip
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
thanks for the report. Now we know.
Janet US
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-25 17:46:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
snip
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
for fewer eggs use a smaller ss bowl. Nothing to clean from pot used
to boil water. Cleaning your small ss bowl is simple, no stuck egg...
not much effort washing a rubber spatula either. Aboard ship I cooked
for nearly 400... I scrambled eggs in a steam jacketed kettle (80
quarts), stirred with an aluminum canoe paddle. I'd make 2-3 batches
for the steam table.
Actually for two eggs I'd not bother with scrambled, a small omelet is
easier/faster. Aboard ship we had no pots/pans, no stove either,
instead we cooked in steam jacketed kettles and we used a flat
top/griddle. At sea the ship never stopped rock'n and rolli'n, pots
and pans would fly off a stovetop. In heavy seas we had a SS fence
that fit the flat top, filled in the edges to seal leaks with a paste
made from salt and oil.
To keep pans from sliding in the oven we used empty cans slightly
flattened. SS food trays were kept from sliding off the tables by
placing them on wet towels. Took a while getting used to living on
something that never stopped moving in all directions, and often
violently. I was lucky, I was one of the few who never got seasick.
Quite a few would ride out a storm with their arms and legs wrapped
around a commode. War ships don't seek a route to avoid storms, they
head directly into storms in case anyone needs help.
Dreadnaughts/Destroyers are the Navy's greyhounds, very fast and
maneuverable. The definition of a war ship is A Floating Platform For
Guns.
Post by US Janet
thanks for the report. Now we know.
Janet US
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-25 19:11:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce
2021-11-25 19:53:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 11:11:33 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Sheldon can't reply for a while. He's doing the dishes.
Michael Trew
2021-11-26 05:29:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-26 10:18:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.

Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.

We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2021-11-26 17:17:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.
Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.
We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.
Cindy Hamilton
Three times? It must be a smaller model. Most of the ones that I've
seen are a full 30-inch wide one, and they hold a lot of pans.

Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-26 18:24:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.  I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron.  I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.

My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.

I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.

https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
Bruce
2021-11-26 18:27:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.  I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron.  I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Teflon kills birds if their cages are too close.
Bruce
2021-11-26 21:22:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.  I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron.  I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Teflon kills birds if their cages are too close.
That has mostly been eliminated but other dangers for birds lurk in the
kitchen
It has not been mostly eliminated. It's still the case. Manufacturers
of non-stick pans lie about what they're using to create the
non-stick. Don't use non-stick pans other than ceramic. Unless you
don't have a bird in the kitchen. Then you're free to poison yourself
:)
Bruce
2021-11-27 10:15:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:02:31 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce
Post by Michael Trew
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Teflon kills birds if their cages are too close.
Which might be a concern for the 2.8% of people who own birds.
Or less. But it's also bad for us.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-27 18:56:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:02:31 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce
Post by Michael Trew
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Teflon kills birds if their cages are too close.
Which might be a concern for the 2.8% of people who own birds.
Or less. But it's also bad for us.
If we all plaster our asses with teflon master, what will happen to
you?
jmcquown
2021-11-27 14:00:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by Michael Trew
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Teflon kills birds if their cages are too close.
Which might be a concern for the 2.8% of people who own birds.
Cindy Hamilton
I had pet birds. I didn't keep their cage in the kitchen.

Jill
Michael Trew
2021-11-27 01:22:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Michael Trew
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.

I have a few old Farberware pots, and lots of copper bottom Reverware
stainless steel. Many from before 1968; good stuff.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-27 10:03:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.
It's toxic only if you overheat it like a moron.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce
2021-11-27 10:17:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:03:45 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.
It's toxic only if you overheat it like a moron.
You don't have to overheat it like a moron. People always hate to find
fault with something they've done for many years. "Can't be true!" "Is
not true!" "Go away!"
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-27 13:28:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:03:45 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.
It's toxic only if you overheat it like a moron.
You don't have to overheat it like a moron. People always hate to find
fault with something they've done for many years. "Can't be true!" "Is
not true!" "Go away!"
Making toast and frying eggs is harmful if you breath enough of the fumes.
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-27 15:51:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:03:45 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.
It's toxic only if you overheat it like a moron.
Cindy Hamilton
I'm not concerned about toxicity, if over heated whatever I'm baking
will be burnt.
jmcquown
2021-11-27 16:07:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:03:45 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.
It's toxic only if you overheat it like a moron.
Cindy Hamilton
I'm not concerned about toxicity, if over heated whatever I'm baking
will be burnt.
Did you mean "making" as opposed to "baking"? Turn down the heat on the
stove; the type of cookware is not an excuse for burning anything.

Jill
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-27 16:55:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Bruce
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:03:45 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.
It's toxic only if you overheat it like a moron.
Cindy Hamilton
I'm not concerned about toxicity, if over heated whatever I'm baking
will be burnt.
Did you mean "making" as opposed to "baking"? Turn down the heat on the
stove; the type of cookware is not an excuse for burning anything.
Jill
The only non-stick coated kitchenware I own is bakeware. I own no
non-stick coated cookware. And I don't burn anything, I use lower
temperatures than most. I don't cook like the TV chefs, all smoke and
fire, showmanship, with the insides raw. We both like baked goods
well done (high brown), but I don't rush things.
jmcquown
2021-11-27 17:03:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by jmcquown
Post by Bruce
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:03:45 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.
It's toxic only if you overheat it like a moron.
Cindy Hamilton
I'm not concerned about toxicity, if over heated whatever I'm baking
will be burnt.
Did you mean "making" as opposed to "baking"? Turn down the heat on the
stove; the type of cookware is not an excuse for burning anything.
Jill
The only non-stick coated kitchenware I own is bakeware. I own no
non-stick coated cookware. And I don't burn anything, I use lower
temperatures than most. I don't cook like the TV chefs, all smoke and
fire, showmanship, with the insides raw. We both like baked goods
well done (high brown), but I don't rush things.
You're the one who mentioned burnt when baking. I don't use nonstick
bakeware. Never burn any thing stovetop or baked (but no nonstick
baking pans).

Jill
Michael Trew
2021-11-27 17:53:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The only non-stick coated kitchenware I own is bakeware. I own no
non-stick coated cookware. And I don't burn anything, I use lower
temperatures than most. I don't cook like the TV chefs, all smoke and
fire, showmanship, with the insides raw. We both like baked goods
well done (high brown), but I don't rush things.
You're the one who mentioned burnt when baking. I don't use nonstick
bakeware. Never burn any thing stovetop or baked (but no nonstick baking
pans).
Jill
I was given a couple of the "insulated" shiny aluminum cookie sheets;
the flat ones with a layer of air between the front and back of the sheet.

I also have a few standard flat ones with a rim all the way around.
They have a coating baked onto them similar to old cast iron skillets.
I'm sure all of the above, given to me by family, are well older than I.
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-27 18:18:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
We both like baked goods well done
Who's we?

https://imgur.com/a/BTxhlbh You and her?

I question both of your tastes, blowhard.
Michael Trew
2021-11-27 17:51:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped. I have an
enamel pan that's semi-non stick, and otherwise, I'll just use cast
iron. I've considered those copper as-seen-on-TV pans, but I figure
they'll end up like teflon pans.
Tefon is not like the original, plus many better coatings have been
devised and work well.
My Woll pan has a "diamond reinforced" top coating and looks perfect
after years of frequent use. Made in Germany, it is a high quality,
thick and even heating pan.
I've had some cheap pans and they may be OK for some things but end up
in the trash but good ones last many years, like my 55 year old Faberware.
https://tinyurl.com/mryfppen
I know that teflon is toxic, so I try to avoid that. I don't own any
"non stick" skillets.
It's toxic only if you overheat it like a moron.
Cindy Hamilton
I don't know what extent "over heating" consists of. "Boiled dry" on a
high flame for a few minutes? Once the oil reaches its smoke point?
Can you only cook up to medium heat? I'd rather not chance it.
Stainless steel pots will last forever, they don't need to be chucked out.
Mike Duffy
2021-11-27 20:04:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
I don't know what extent "over heating" consists of. "Boiled dry"
Yes Michael. If you put an aluminum teapot on 'High' and all the water
boils out, the aluminum will melt. I'd call that 'over-heating'.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-27 21:13:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Michael Trew
I don't know what extent "over heating" consists of. "Boiled dry"
Yes Michael. If you put an aluminum teapot on 'High' and all the water
boils out, the aluminum will melt. I'd call that 'over-heating'.
Teflon is a problem above about 500F/260C. Normal cooking never gets
near that but carelessness can.
Dave Smith
2021-11-27 21:44:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Duffy
I don't know what extent "over heating" consists of.  "Boiled dry"
Yes Michael. If you put an aluminum teapot on 'High' and all the water
boils out, the aluminum will melt. I'd call that 'over-heating'.
Teflon is a problem above about 500F/260C.  Normal cooking never gets
near that but carelessness can.
Tell that to my wife. She uses the smoke detector as a kitchen timer.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-27 10:00:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.
Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.
We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.
Cindy Hamilton
Three times? It must be a smaller model. Most of the ones that I've
seen are a full 30-inch wide one, and they hold a lot of pans.
A standard dishwasher is 24 inches wide. Mine is a standard
dishwasher.

The first time we ran it on Thursday, some of the dishes were
from Wednesday night's supper. Once after lunch, which was
the big "Thanksgiving dinner"; once after supper, which included
the dishes generated from making carrot cake.
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.
Amazingly, that is under the owner's control. When mine start getting
beat up, I replace them. The old ones go in the recycle bin.

Cindy Hamilton
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-27 13:56:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:00:49 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.
Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.
We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.
Cindy Hamilton
Three times? It must be a smaller model. Most of the ones that I've
seen are a full 30-inch wide one, and they hold a lot of pans.
A standard dishwasher is 24 inches wide. Mine is a standard
dishwasher.
The first time we ran it on Thursday, some of the dishes were
from Wednesday night's supper. Once after lunch, which was
the big "Thanksgiving dinner"; once after supper, which included
the dishes generated from making carrot cake.
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.
Amazingly, that is under the owner's control. When mine start getting
beat up, I replace them. The old ones go in the recycle bin.
Cindy Hamilton
The last time we ran our dishwasher was for last years New Years
dishes because we had company. Mostly it's only the two of us so I
hand wash the dinner dishes, the rest of the day we each hand wash
what we use, which isn't much, it's no big deal to hand wash a cup or
a glass. Quality glassware is washed by hand, the dish washing
compounds cloud good glassware... quality dinnerware will also cloud
from dishwashing compounds. Before I go to bed each night I hand wash
my Crystal Palace glass. Dishwashers are for dreck dishes as are used
at eateries. I've been hand washing dishes all my life, I don't mind
and I'm ten times faster than an automatic dishwasher and I do a
better more sanitary job. The only reason we have an automatic
dishwasher is because there was one here when we bought this house and
we soon discovered it didn't work so we had a new top of the line
Maytag installed. This was some thirty years ago and I doubt it gets
used more than 2-3 times a year, mostly for plastic storage
containers, the dishwasher does a better job of removing the oily film
than I can by hand. I lived most of my life without an automatic
dishwasher, both our parents didn't have one... actually this is the
first house I've lived in with an automatic dishwasher, and I'd not
miss it. I wash as I go, when I've served food there's nothing needs
washing but two place settings, takes me less than ten minutes by
hand. The truth be told people who save up dirty dishes in their
dishwasher disgust me, their dishwasher stinks from that filthy dirty
habit... and that stench travels everywhere throughout their house....
I can tell immediately when entering their house that there are filthy
dishes in their dishwasher. They become so immune to that stench that
they don't notice.... they rather live like animals then exert the
little effort to handwash a few dishes. I think those who rely
totally on a dishwasher are not mentally balanced.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-27 14:16:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:00:49 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.
Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.
We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.
Cindy Hamilton
Three times? It must be a smaller model. Most of the ones that I've
seen are a full 30-inch wide one, and they hold a lot of pans.
A standard dishwasher is 24 inches wide. Mine is a standard
dishwasher.
The first time we ran it on Thursday, some of the dishes were
from Wednesday night's supper. Once after lunch, which was
the big "Thanksgiving dinner"; once after supper, which included
the dishes generated from making carrot cake.
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.
Amazingly, that is under the owner's control. When mine start getting
beat up, I replace them. The old ones go in the recycle bin.
Cindy Hamilton
The last time we ran our dishwasher was for last years New Years
dishes because we had company. Mostly it's only the two of us so I
hand wash the dinner dishes, the rest of the day we each hand wash
what we use, which isn't much, it's no big deal to hand wash a cup or
a glass. Quality glassware is washed by hand, the dish washing
compounds cloud good glassware... quality dinnerware will also cloud
from dishwashing compounds. Before I go to bed each night I hand wash
my Crystal Palace glass. Dishwashers are for dreck dishes as are used
at eateries. I've been hand washing dishes all my life, I don't mind
and I'm ten times faster than an automatic dishwasher and I do a
better more sanitary job. The only reason we have an automatic
dishwasher is because there was one here when we bought this house and
we soon discovered it didn't work so we had a new top of the line
Maytag installed. This was some thirty years ago and I doubt it gets
used more than 2-3 times a year, mostly for plastic storage
containers, the dishwasher does a better job of removing the oily film
than I can by hand. I lived most of my life without an automatic
dishwasher, both our parents didn't have one... actually this is the
first house I've lived in with an automatic dishwasher, and I'd not
miss it. I wash as I go, when I've served food there's nothing needs
washing but two place settings, takes me less than ten minutes by
hand. The truth be told people who save up dirty dishes in their
dishwasher disgust me, their dishwasher stinks from that filthy dirty
habit... and that stench travels everywhere throughout their house....
I can tell immediately when entering their house that there are filthy
dishes in their dishwasher. They become so immune to that stench that
they don't notice.... they rather live like animals then exert the
little effort to handwash a few dishes. I think those who rely
totally on a dishwasher are not mentally balanced.
I do _so_ love reading your sermons. Keep up the Good Work.

Cindy Hamilton
Sheldon Martin
2021-11-27 15:45:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:00:49 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.
Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.
We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.
Cindy Hamilton
Three times? It must be a smaller model. Most of the ones that I've
seen are a full 30-inch wide one, and they hold a lot of pans.
A standard dishwasher is 24 inches wide. Mine is a standard
dishwasher.
The first time we ran it on Thursday, some of the dishes were
from Wednesday night's supper. Once after lunch, which was
the big "Thanksgiving dinner"; once after supper, which included
the dishes generated from making carrot cake.
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.
Amazingly, that is under the owner's control. When mine start getting
beat up, I replace them. The old ones go in the recycle bin.
Cindy Hamilton
Why amazingly? I'll do you one better, I don't own any non-stick pots
& pans. People who know how to cook have no need for non-stick
cookware. Why anyone needs a non-stick pot or pan is beyond my
belief, yet I've seen people cooking soup and boiling pasta, or
boiling veggies with a non-stick pot.
Restaurant kitchens have no non-stick cookware. I've never seen a
Chinese restaurant using non-stick woks. How long do you think a
coating would last on a pan used for stir frying?
I do have a gingerbread house mold set of cast iron with a non-stick
coating, all the intricate pieces would be prone to breakage upon
removal otherwise. My Nordicware is cast aluminum with a non-stick
coating, again the designs are too intricate for removal otherwise.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-27 18:06:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:00:49 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.
Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.
We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.
Cindy Hamilton
Three times? It must be a smaller model. Most of the ones that I've
seen are a full 30-inch wide one, and they hold a lot of pans.
A standard dishwasher is 24 inches wide. Mine is a standard
dishwasher.
The first time we ran it on Thursday, some of the dishes were
from Wednesday night's supper. Once after lunch, which was
the big "Thanksgiving dinner"; once after supper, which included
the dishes generated from making carrot cake.
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.
Amazingly, that is under the owner's control. When mine start getting
beat up, I replace them. The old ones go in the recycle bin.
Cindy Hamilton
Why amazingly?
Michael seemed to indicate that "chipped" is the default state of teflon
cookware.
Post by Sheldon Martin
I'll do you one better, I don't own any non-stick pots
& pans. People who know how to cook have no need for non-stick
cookware.
Need? No. I don't need anything more than a stick over a campfire.
It's nice to have the tools one likes to use.

Cindy Hamilton
dsi1
2021-11-27 21:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:00:49 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.
Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.
We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.
Cindy Hamilton
Three times? It must be a smaller model. Most of the ones that I've
seen are a full 30-inch wide one, and they hold a lot of pans.
A standard dishwasher is 24 inches wide. Mine is a standard
dishwasher.
The first time we ran it on Thursday, some of the dishes were
from Wednesday night's supper. Once after lunch, which was
the big "Thanksgiving dinner"; once after supper, which included
the dishes generated from making carrot cake.
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.
Amazingly, that is under the owner's control. When mine start getting
beat up, I replace them. The old ones go in the recycle bin.
Cindy Hamilton
Why amazingly? I'll do you one better, I don't own any non-stick pots
& pans. People who know how to cook have no need for non-stick
cookware. Why anyone needs a non-stick pot or pan is beyond my
belief, yet I've seen people cooking soup and boiling pasta, or
boiling veggies with a non-stick pot.
Restaurant kitchens have no non-stick cookware. I've never seen a
Chinese restaurant using non-stick woks. How long do you think a
coating would last on a pan used for stir frying?
I do have a gingerbread house mold set of cast iron with a non-stick
coating, all the intricate pieces would be prone to breakage upon
removal otherwise. My Nordicware is cast aluminum with a non-stick
coating, again the designs are too intricate for removal otherwise.
Chinese woks are indeed non-stick. My wok is the easiest of pans to clean. The coating is more durable than any coated non-stick pan I've ever had. You can use metal tools with a wok. The main drawback to a wok is you have to be liberal with the oil. These days, I'm using cheap Korean maifan pans on a cheap butane burner. It's awesome!
GM
2021-11-27 22:54:42 UTC
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Post by dsi1
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 27 Nov 2021 02:00:49 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
snip
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
As you do, gentle heat, stir, done. I can see the double boiler if you
are making a dozen or so as it takes less attention but for two eggs,
I'm not going to make the extra effort.
Really no extra effort, actually less effort, clean up is easier...
Dishwasher. Quite the modern invention. While I'm here reading your
latest pontification, the dishes are being washed.
Cindy Hamilton
I've never seen a dishwasher that would get caked on stuff off of
skillets. Caked/baked always had to be hand washed... at that point, it
makes me wonder why load a dishwasher unless, for instance, Thanksgiving
crowd.
Teflon.
Yes, I occasionally have to soak/scrub something, like the roasting pan
in which I cooked yesterday's turkey. It's too big for the dishwasher
anyhow. I'm not going to forego a dishwasher just because I have to
scrub something by hand once a month.
We ran the dishwasher three times yesterday, for the two of us. That's
unusual; normally it's once a day.
Cindy Hamilton
Three times? It must be a smaller model. Most of the ones that I've
seen are a full 30-inch wide one, and they hold a lot of pans.
A standard dishwasher is 24 inches wide. Mine is a standard
dishwasher.
The first time we ran it on Thursday, some of the dishes were
from Wednesday night's supper. Once after lunch, which was
the big "Thanksgiving dinner"; once after supper, which included
the dishes generated from making carrot cake.
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.
Amazingly, that is under the owner's control. When mine start getting
beat up, I replace them. The old ones go in the recycle bin.
Cindy Hamilton
Why amazingly? I'll do you one better, I don't own any non-stick pots
& pans. People who know how to cook have no need for non-stick
cookware. Why anyone needs a non-stick pot or pan is beyond my
belief, yet I've seen people cooking soup and boiling pasta, or
boiling veggies with a non-stick pot.
Restaurant kitchens have no non-stick cookware. I've never seen a
Chinese restaurant using non-stick woks. How long do you think a
coating would last on a pan used for stir frying?
I do have a gingerbread house mold set of cast iron with a non-stick
coating, all the intricate pieces would be prone to breakage upon
removal otherwise. My Nordicware is cast aluminum with a non-stick
coating, again the designs are too intricate for removal otherwise.
Chinese woks are indeed non-stick. My wok is the easiest of pans to clean. The coating is more durable than any coated non-stick pan I've ever had. You can use metal tools with a wok. The main drawback to a wok is you have to be liberal with the oil. These days, I'm using cheap Korean maifan pans on a cheap butane burner. It's awesome!
Why did you not bother to trim your post?

The fact that you are a "lazy trimmer" reflects poorly on you - in future strive to do better, please...
--
GM
Michael Trew
2021-11-27 17:49:05 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Michael Trew
Teflon wigs me out, I've seen too much of that chipped.
Amazingly, that is under the owner's control. When mine start getting
beat up, I replace them. The old ones go in the recycle bin.
Cindy Hamilton
Even before they chip, you aren't at all concerned about heating teflon
pans red hot and some of that leaching into your food? The give off
toxic gas when heated to a certain level. I've also read about the
"forever chemicals" that go into making them.
Mike Duffy
2021-11-24 22:05:02 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
But were they fluffy? I take it there was no 'off' taste.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-25 00:12:27 UTC
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Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Made my eggs with baking powder this morning. IMO, not worth the walk
to the pantry to get an extra ingredient.
But were they fluffy? I take it there was no 'off' taste.
Taste not affected at all. The fluffiness did not seem to be a lot
different. Perhaps if I added more? Maybe another try at some point
but certainly did no harm.
heyjoe
2021-11-23 15:48:16 UTC
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Post by US Janet
https://www.msn.com/
Sorry, but until Guy Crosby, America's Test Kitchen, Serious Eats or
some other reputable cooking source advocates baking powder in
scrambled eggs, I'll pass - thank you very much.

I expected the cite to be The Babylon Bee.
--
"I jotted down three names: Julia Child, Mr. Wizard and Monty Python"
A. Brown
bruce bowser
2021-11-24 23:04:25 UTC
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Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
Baking Powder Is The Foolproof Approach To The Best Scrambled Eggs
Baking powder is a dry chemical leavening agent. The mixture typically
contains baking soda, cream of tartar (dry acid), and occasionally
cornstarch. A familiar pantry staple, it is commonly used to improve
volume and texture in various baked goods.
Baking powder releases carbon dioxide into batter via an acid-base
reaction, causing bubbles in the batter to expand and leaven the
mixture. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to
eggs alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancakes.
All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.
However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.
How To Add Baking Powder To Scrambled Eggs
The addition of baking powder to scrambled eggs isn’t rocket science,
but thereare some practical tips. It is possible to add too much of
this unconventional additive, which could lead to a chemical
aftertaste.
No.
Sh!t.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-24 23:50:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by US Janet
Why You Need To Start Adding Baking Powder To Your Scrambled Eggs ASAP
Scrambled eggs may be considered a humble dish by most diners, but
surprisingly many home cooks struggle to perfect it. Fans of the
quintessential diner breakfast know that a hard scramble technique
ensures big, fluffy curds when done correctly. But, following a
certain method doesn’t always produce the results you want when it
comes to eggs.
So, if you want those dreamy, voluptuous curds, switching up your game
is key. Yet spending time pining over higher heat, more or less dairy,
and beating techniques are likely to drive a person insane.
Fortunately, you don’t have to settle for a mediocre scramble. There
is a foolproof way to prepare fluffy, tender scrambled eggs using a
pantry staple.
Thanks to a quick hack involving baking powder, you can make the best
scrambled eggs. In addition, this quick and easy method won’t make you
feel like you’re preparing scrambled eggs in Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s
Kitchen.
Baking Powder Is The Foolproof Approach To The Best Scrambled Eggs
Baking powder is a dry chemical leavening agent. The mixture typically
contains baking soda, cream of tartar (dry acid), and occasionally
cornstarch. A familiar pantry staple, it is commonly used to improve
volume and texture in various baked goods.
Baking powder releases carbon dioxide into batter via an acid-base
reaction, causing bubbles in the batter to expand and leaven the
mixture. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to
eggs alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancakes.
All you need to do to activate baking powder is add a liquid, such as
eggs. In fact, while it may seem strange to add baking powder to eggs
alone, it works in the same way as it would in pancake batter.
Therefore, baking powder will also add a fluffy and light consistency
to your scrambled eggs, guaranteed.
However, prior to adding baking powder to your favorite scrambled eggs
recipe, you should follow these tips to achieve the best results.
How To Add Baking Powder To Scrambled Eggs
The addition of baking powder to scrambled eggs isn’t rocket science,
but thereare some practical tips. It is possible to add too much of
this unconventional additive, which could lead to a chemical
aftertaste.
No.
Sh!t.
I experimented with this several years ago. It can tenderize meats,
but if not careful, you'll get a metallic taste. And your grub will
be slimy as hell.

Perhaps eggs can be transformed to something magical with a
sprinkle of leavening?

Ed tried it and reported negative results.

Folks should report their baking/soda/ powder eggs in this thread.

RFC test kitchen.
Mike Duffy
2021-11-25 04:30:21 UTC
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Post by Hank Rogers
Folks should report their baking/soda/ powder eggs in this thread.
I did, but was a bit verbose. In summary, BP is better than BS. Cook
slowly (the usual advice); not quickly with a microwave as my tests were
more to validate BS vs. BP using identical cook settings.

Quantity was ~ 1 cc per egg. This could be cut to about 1/4 cc because I
ended up with 8x expansion which shrunk on termination of power to ~ 2x.

(Ideally, you want the expansion to be 'fixed' by final cooking.)
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