Discussion:
I did that "Open a Random Cookbook to a Random Page" again today..,.
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Sqwertz
2021-11-15 22:36:12 UTC
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Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.

This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!

I thought this random cookbook/page flip was especially fitting
since on Saturday night I asked Ed what "ground ham" would be used
for. And on Sunday Cindy replied "Ham Loaf". And on Monday I
opened up this page:

Loading Image...

Now tell me there's no God up there laughing his ass off!

I was busy laughing and mocking the first recipe, that when I
glanced at the title of the second recipe I was literally ROTFLMAO.
WHY OH WHY would you want to FAKE the first recipe, fod God's Sake!

And then I read that second recipe and saw whole hot dogs in a sweet
ground beef loaf and I lost my breath, and then consciousness
laughing so hard.

I'm gonna scan this whole book. It's worse than anything else you've
ever seen. It's so hilarious it must be a cult classic if it's on
it's 38th printing in only 7 years!

-sw
GM
2021-11-15 22:42:00 UTC
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Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
I thought this random cookbook/page flip was especially fitting
since on Saturday night I asked Ed what "ground ham" would be used
for. And on Sunday Cindy replied "Ham Loaf". And on Monday I
https://i.postimg.cc/QdjtJ7GN/Ham-Recipes-from-Pennsylvania.jpg
Now tell me there's no God up there laughing his ass off!
I was busy laughing and mocking the first recipe, that when I
glanced at the title of the second recipe I was literally ROTFLMAO.
WHY OH WHY would you want to FAKE the first recipe, fod God's Sake!
And then I read that second recipe and saw whole hot dogs in a sweet
ground beef loaf and I lost my breath, and then consciousness
laughing so hard.
I'm gonna scan this whole book. It's worse than anything else you've
ever seen. It's so hilarious it must be a cult classic if it's on
it's 38th printing in only 7 years!
Is this one of those "church lady" cookbooks, Steve...???
--
GM
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-16 09:26:41 UTC
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Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.

Cindy Hamilton
Ed Pawlowski
2021-11-16 13:27:13 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
Some are worth a browse and even the occasional idea. You have to skip
over the Kielbasa in Grape Jelly though. Most of us here laugh, but
those meals are served to millions every day.

I avoid church suppers and pot lucks too. If you are lucky, there is a
simple cheese platter to nibble on until you can get away and go out for
dinner.
Michael Trew
2021-11-16 20:57:55 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
Some are worth a browse and even the occasional idea. You have to skip
over the Kielbasa in Grape Jelly though. Most of us here laugh, but
those meals are served to millions every day.
I avoid church suppers and pot lucks too. If you are lucky, there is a
simple cheese platter to nibble on until you can get away and go out for
dinner.
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
Bruce
2021-11-16 21:14:59 UTC
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
Some are worth a browse and even the occasional idea. You have to skip
over the Kielbasa in Grape Jelly though. Most of us here laugh, but
those meals are served to millions every day.
I avoid church suppers and pot lucks too. If you are lucky, there is a
simple cheese platter to nibble on until you can get away and go out for
dinner.
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
The concept of 'church supper'...
Michael Trew
2021-11-17 04:33:40 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
Some are worth a browse and even the occasional idea. You have to skip
over the Kielbasa in Grape Jelly though. Most of us here laugh, but
those meals are served to millions every day.
I avoid church suppers and pot lucks too. If you are lucky, there is a
simple cheese platter to nibble on until you can get away and go out for
dinner.
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
The concept of 'church supper'...
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
Bruce
2021-11-17 04:44:26 UTC
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
The concept of 'church supper'...
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Hank Rogers
2021-11-17 05:07:13 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
The concept of 'church supper'...
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
You'd like churches master. You could sniff all the pews after the
congregation leaves.
GM
2021-11-17 06:19:02 UTC
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Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
The concept of 'church supper'...
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
You'd like churches master. You could sniff all the pews after the
congregation leaves.
Some pews are even upholstered now - sniffing HEAVEN...
--
GM
Jeßus
2021-11-17 07:26:01 UTC
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Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
The concept of 'church supper'...
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
You'd like churches master. You could sniff all the pews after the
congregation leaves.
LOL, I liked that one.
cshenk
2021-11-21 21:57:24 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never
heard >>> of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess
Presbyterians >>> can cook! I'd look forward to that over most
restaurant meals.
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
The concept of 'church supper'...
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!

He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.

BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a
lighter meal.
Bruce
2021-11-21 22:50:36 UTC
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On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:57:24 -0600, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.
Ok, church soup lunch. I didn't know that was a thing.
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a
lighter meal.
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
Ophelia
2021-11-22 21:26:43 UTC
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Post by Bruce
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:57:24 -0600, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.
Ok, church soup lunch. I didn't know that was a thing.
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a===
lighter meal.
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
=====

Back in the day here, it was Breakfast, dinner and tea! Now, it is
brekafast, lunch and dinner:)
Ophelia
2021-11-22 22:09:05 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:57:24 -0600, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.
Ok, church soup lunch. I didn't know that was a thing.
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a===
lighter meal.
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
=====
Back in the day here, it was Breakfast, dinner and tea! Now, it is
brekafast, lunch and dinner:)
And, I'll add, the "drinks hour" before dinner :)
Bruce
2021-11-22 22:31:17 UTC
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Permalink
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 14:09:05 -0800 (PST), Ophelia
Post by Ophelia
Post by Bruce
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:57:24 -0600, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.
Ok, church soup lunch. I didn't know that was a thing.
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a===
lighter meal.
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
=====
Back in the day here, it was Breakfast, dinner and tea! Now, it is
brekafast, lunch and dinner:)
And, I'll add, the "drinks hour" before dinner :)
I thought that was from 5 PM until bed time :)
Ophelia
2021-11-22 22:52:28 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 14:09:05 -0800 (PST), Ophelia
Post by Ophelia
Post by Bruce
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:57:24 -0600, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.
Ok, church soup lunch. I didn't know that was a thing.
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a===
lighter meal.
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
=====
Back in the day here, it was Breakfast, dinner and tea! Now, it is
brekafast, lunch and dinner:)
And, I'll add, the "drinks hour" before dinner :)
I thought that was from 5 PM until bed time :)
lol
Ophelia
2021-11-23 11:11:17 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Bruce
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 14:09:05 -0800 (PST), Ophelia
Post by Ophelia
Post by Bruce
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:57:24 -0600, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.
Ok, church soup lunch. I didn't know that was a thing.
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a===
lighter meal.
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
=====
Back in the day here, it was Breakfast, dinner and tea! Now, it is
brekafast, lunch and dinner:)
And, I'll add, the "drinks hour" before dinner :)
I thought that was from 5 PM until bed time :)
LOL not in our house:)
Bruce
2021-11-22 22:30:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
Post by Bruce
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
=====
Back in the day here, it was Breakfast, dinner and tea! Now, it is
brekafast, lunch and dinner:)
Yes, breakfast, lunch and dinner is how I know it. But I do vaguely
remember the main, cooked dinner of the day to be around noon. I think
that was late 60s.
Hank Rogers
2021-11-22 23:18:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by Ophelia
Post by Bruce
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
=====
Back in the day here, it was Breakfast, dinner and tea! Now, it is
brekafast, lunch and dinner:)
Yes, breakfast, lunch and dinner is how I know it. But I do vaguely
remember the main, cooked dinner of the day to be around noon. I think
that was late 60s.
In uncivilized places, we just call it vittles, any time of day.

Prevents a lot of squabbling over what it should be called.
Ophelia
2021-11-23 11:10:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by Ophelia
Post by Bruce
Yes, I see people in RFC use "supper" for "dinner". In Australia,
certain types of people -like Jebus- call dinner "tea". "Don't disturb
the wife. She's cooking me tea."
=====
Back in the day here, it was Breakfast, dinner and tea! Now, it is
brekafast, lunch and dinner:)
Yes, breakfast, lunch and dinner is how I know it. But I do vaguely
remember the main, cooked dinner of the day to be around noon. I think
that was late 60s.
Yes:))
Michael Trew
2021-11-22 00:41:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.
Very much so! I think Bruce knew this, but he was pushing buttons.
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a
lighter meal.
I did learn about this some time ago. Since I work in the evenings, I
normally eat this way. Light meals or leftovers for supper, but dinner
is in the early afternoon. It's really a more sensible way to eat,
considering that there is no nutritional need for a large meal in the
evening.

IIRC, the term "supper" actually stems from "soup", as in, before
refrigeration, left overs, meat bones, etc from the noon dinner were
turned into a soup or otherwise light meal for the evening. My
grandparents regularly use term "supper" for the evening meal, that's
just normal for me. "Dinner" seems to be more common now for the
evening meal.
Bruce
2021-11-22 02:59:22 UTC
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Permalink
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 19:41:04 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by cshenk
He probably means a church soup lunch. Very common in the USA to have a
sort of 'social' (sedate party) after church, often outside but may not
be. Various church go'ers bring soups that are home made. Normally
very good to 'outstanding'.
Very much so! I think Bruce knew this, but he was pushing buttons.
Churches are much bigger in your culture than in mine. I had never
heard of church lunches, church soup and whatever y'all do with your
church, before RFC. I wasn't pushing buttons. Please remember, that
not everybody is American.
Post by Michael Trew
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a
lighter meal.
I did learn about this some time ago. Since I work in the evenings, I
normally eat this way. Light meals or leftovers for supper, but dinner
is in the early afternoon. It's really a more sensible way to eat,
considering that there is no nutritional need for a large meal in the
evening.
So your supper is your dinner and your dinner is your lunch. How
culturally quaint of you.
Michael Trew
2021-11-22 00:42:30 UTC
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Permalink
Post by cshenk
BTW, 'Supper' normally means a light meal while 'Dinner' is a full
meal. Lots of variation in the USA on it but in older times, 'about
noon' was a heavy meal (Dinner) while a later lighter meal (supper)
was eaten towards the evening. Today, the later meal name in
interchangeable depending on what part of the county you are in here
with probably most using 'Lunch' and 'Dinner'. Supper is generally
understood if used, for the evening meal but no longer is always a
lighter meal.
Another interesting note, regardless of how people eat their normal
weekday meals, it's almost entirely uniform in the USA to have
"Christmas Dinner", "Thanksgiving Dinner", or other formal large meal at
noon or early afternoon. I assume this stems from the old style of the
large meal in mid-day (although it aids in people visiting and traveling
to save the daylight hours). My family always started cooking the main
formal dinner early in the day.
Gary
2021-11-22 12:09:13 UTC
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Permalink
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never
heard >>> of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess
Presbyterians >>> can cook! I'd look forward to that over most
restaurant meals.
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
The concept of 'church supper'...
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
Have you gone from "rags to riches?"
cshenk
2021-11-26 23:36:51 UTC
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Post by Gary
Post by cshenk
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:33:40 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:57:55 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never
heard >>> of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess
Presbyterians >>> can cook! I'd look forward to that over most
restaurant meals.
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Bruce
The concept of 'church supper'...
Soup luncheons were always great also. Lots of good home made soup.
As in soup kitchen?
Not sure on his, but believe it or not, here many of the 'soup
kitchens' are very good!
Have you gone from "rags to riches?"
I've helped make the food at soup kitchens. San Antonio, Virginia
Beach and Chesapeake.

Leonard Blaisdell
2021-11-19 01:39:53 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
I'm doing this for you, Michael. I read to the end of the thread and
"nobody" mentioned meatballs in grape jelly. There's been well over a
thousand posts on that subject in the past.
Don't let Michael down. Let's get crackin' folks! ;)
FWIW, I like a couple at a party, not for a meal, and they're not
difficult to make with a crock-pot. I'm sure that kielbasa is even
easier.
GM
2021-11-19 01:49:29 UTC
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Post by Leonard Blaisdell
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
I'm doing this for you, Michael. I read to the end of the thread and
"nobody" mentioned meatballs in grape jelly. There's been well over a
thousand posts on that subject in the past.
Don't let Michael down. Let's get crackin' folks! ;)
FWIW, I like a couple at a party, not for a meal, and they're not
difficult to make with a crock-pot. I'm sure that kielbasa is even
easier.
Ah, meatballs in grape jelly - NANCY YOUNG PLEASE CHECK IN...!!!

;-)
--
GM
Michael Trew
2021-11-19 07:00:47 UTC
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Post by Leonard Blaisdell
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never heard
of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess Presbyterians
can cook! I'd look forward to that over most restaurant meals.
I'm doing this for you, Michael. I read to the end of the thread and
"nobody" mentioned meatballs in grape jelly. There's been well over a
thousand posts on that subject in the past.
Don't let Michael down. Let's get crackin' folks! ;)
FWIW, I like a couple at a party, not for a meal, and they're not
difficult to make with a crock-pot. I'm sure that kielbasa is even
easier.
LOL let me know how it turns out
cshenk
2021-11-21 22:04:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
Post by Michael Trew
I've never been to a bad church supper, and have certainly never
heard of kielbasa in jelly... ick. I don't know, but I guess
Presbyterians can cook! I'd look forward to that over most
restaurant meals.
I'm doing this for you, Michael. I read to the end of the thread and
"nobody" mentioned meatballs in grape jelly. There's been well over a
thousand posts on that subject in the past.
Don't let Michael down. Let's get crackin' folks! ;)
FWIW, I like a couple at a party, not for a meal, and they're not
difficult to make with a crock-pot. I'm sure that kielbasa is even
easier.
Smile, it works mixed with another sauce for meatball/sausage balls in
a crockpot. Not sure on Kielbasa. I'd tend more to mustard bases there.
Michael Trew
2021-11-16 20:58:39 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
Some are worth a browse and even the occasional idea. You have to skip
over the Kielbasa in Grape Jelly though. Most of us here laugh, but
those meals are served to millions every day.
Kielbasa in grape jelly? I've never seen grape jelly and before I
moved to Australia, I'd never heard of kielbasa.
You wouldn't like kielbasa, it's dead animal. Tastes great to me with
sauerkraut!
Bruce
2021-11-16 21:14:00 UTC
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 15:58:39 -0500, Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
Some are worth a browse and even the occasional idea. You have to skip
over the Kielbasa in Grape Jelly though. Most of us here laugh, but
those meals are served to millions every day.
Kielbasa in grape jelly? I've never seen grape jelly and before I
moved to Australia, I'd never heard of kielbasa.
You wouldn't like kielbasa, it's dead animal. Tastes great to me with
sauerkraut!
I know, it's some kind of sausage, I believe.
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-16 22:07:05 UTC
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Permalink
You wouldn't like kielbasa, it's dead animal. Tastes great to me with
sauerkraut!
And turnip greens, too. I usually do a bit of browning before tossing
the slices in with the greens.
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-16 21:44:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
Some are worth a browse and even the occasional idea. You have to skip
over the Kielbasa in Grape Jelly though. Most of us here laugh, but
those meals are served to millions every day.
I avoid church suppers and pot lucks too. If you are lucky, there is a
simple cheese platter to nibble on until you can get away and go out for
dinner.
I figure it's a beatitudes thing. Like the shittier you eat in this life,
the better you'll eat in the afterlife.

*Blessed are those who eat the shitty food at the church potluck,
for the finest delicacies shall be laid out for them in Heaven.*
I bet Jesus even said something of the sort, and Matthew just
failed to write it down. There's only so fast you can take notes
with a quill on a papyrus scroll.

--Bryan
Gary
2021-11-16 14:19:38 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
I have a few regional church cookbooks. These are mostly old family
recipes. Don't ignore them...at least give them all a look.

These are where you'll find the old "gramma's recipes" that so many
remember and love.

:)
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-16 15:31:24 UTC
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Post by Gary
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
Cindy Hamilton
I have a few regional church cookbooks. These are mostly old family
recipes. Don't ignore them...at least give them all a look.
These are where you'll find the old "gramma's recipes" that so many
remember and love.
:)
No. Just no. I don't remember and love any old family recipes. I don't
eat those kinds of things. I want bright, light, clean, fresh flavors.
Not stodgy old family recipes.

I've been taking a look at this one recently:
<https://www.seriouseats.com/yam-woon-sen-glass-noodle-salad-5206676>

Cindy Hamilton
Jeßus
2021-11-16 17:18:59 UTC
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 01:26:41 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
I've only ever sought out, bought and kept one set of cookbooks and
that's Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking.
Jeßus
2021-11-17 21:11:58 UTC
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 09:58:40 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Jeßus
On Tue, 16 Nov 2021 01:26:41 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sqwertz
Apparently I've got The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly on my cookbook
shelves.
This particular cookbook is full of so many disgusting things it's
fucking hilarious!
We have my mother-in-law's church cookbook on the shelf, simply
because my husband is sentimental. We certainly never open it.
I've only ever sought out, bought and kept one set of cookbooks and
that's Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking.
Good choice. I'm not interested in French cooking; I had to learn
everything I know about the mother sauces "on the street". My
Hollandaise still isn't anything to brag about.
Going back 10-14 years ago, I used to cook a lot of recipes out of
those books. Did a lot of 'serious' time consuming cooking with my
then-girlfriend. These days, my wife does 95% of the cooking, at least
now my time is freed up to do more work around the property.
I mostly look for recipes online these days. I can't recall if my most
recent cookbook purchase was Bittman's How to Cook Everything
or if it was Roden's The New Book of Middle Eastern Food.
Yep, online is all I need these days.
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