Discussion:
Butter
Add Reply
Sheldon Martin
2021-07-29 14:16:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Sheldon posted this in 1999
Subject: Re: Unsalted butter
Date: Saturday, February 27, 1999 9:03 PM
probably a different usage then... in the US I think sweet butter
generally refets to unsalted.
Actually, in the US, sweet butter refers to fruit butters... as in -
Apple
Butter, Cherry Butter, etc. Oftimes these 'sweet butters' have no
butter in them at all...
Where? I've lived on both coasts and the midwest and have never heard
this.tj
This has got to be at least the 7th time in as many years that I've posted
this.
"Butter: Made by churning cream until it reaches a semisolid state,
butter must by U.S. law be at least 80 percent MILK FAT. The remaining
20 percent consists of water and milk solids. The U.S. Department of
Agriculture (USDA) grades butter quality based on flavor, body, texture,
color and salt. Butter packages bear a shield surrounding the letter
grade (and occasionally the numerical score equivalent) indicating the
quality of the contents. The grades, beginning with the finest, are AA
(93 score), A (92 score), B (90 score) and C (89 score). AA and A grades
are those most commonly found at the retail level.
Butter may be artificially colored (with natural ANNATTO); it may also
be salted or unsalted. Unsalted butter is usually labeled as such and
contains absolutely no salt. It's sometimes erroneously referred to as
"sweet" butter — a misnomer because any butter made with sweet instead
of sour cream is sweet butter. Therefore, expect packages labeled "sweet
cream butter" to contain salted butter. Unsalted butter is preferred by
many for everyday eating and baking. Because it contains no salt (which
acts as a preservative), it is more perishable than salted butter and
therefore stored in the freezer section of some markets.
Whipped butter has had air beaten into it, thereby increasing volume and
creating a softer, more spreadable consistency when cold. It comes
in salted and unsalted forms. Light or reduced-calorie butter has about
half the fat of regular butter, possible through the addition of water,
skim milk and gelatin. It shouldn't be substituted for regular butter or
margarine in frying and baking. Storing butter: Because butter absorbs
*flavors* like a sponge, it should be wrapped airtight for storage.
Upon rereading I believe it more accurate to say butter absorbs
*odors*, that's the reason for a covered butter dish.
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt. I actually don't
cook with salt, anyone wants salt I have salt shakers... for the same
reason that I wouldn't want any eatery salting my eggs. Mostly I like
to sprinkle salt on raw veggies, like yesterday I sprinkled kosher
salt on fresh picked kirby cukes from the garden, I quarter them
lengthwise. Once you eat home grown Kirbys you'll never eat cukes
from the market again... I pick them small, 3-4", no seeds, and
naturally no wax, no need to peel Kirbys anyway. Kirbys are the best
cuke to pickle by fermentation. Kirbys are very prolific, from six
plants you'll get more cukes than you can eat, that's one reason I
pickle a bunch, they'll keep a long time refrigerated, I fill gallon
jars, usually 3-4... that's another use for the basement fridge.
I also add carrots in with the cukes, slices or spears, very good
pickled, and the spears fill the spaces between the cukes.
Refrigerate regular butter for up to 1 month, unsalted butter for up to
2 weeks. Both can be frozen for up to 6 months."
from THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition,
by Sharon Tyler Herbst, Barron's Educational Services, Inc.
Sheldon
Cindy Hamilton
2021-07-29 14:37:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Post by Sheldon Martin
I actually don't
cook with salt, anyone wants salt I have salt shakers...
It's not the same. Food is better when the salt penetrates all the way
through it.

I'm glad to know I'll never be invited to eat your cooking.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce 3.1
2021-07-29 18:58:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:37:54 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Old people need more salt.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-07-29 19:11:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:37:54 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Old people need more salt.
Perhaps. My blood pressure tends to be low, so I don't
really worry about how much sodium I ingest.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2021-07-30 05:08:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:37:54 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
dsi1
2021-07-30 05:23:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:37:54 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
Old folks start having problems with eating spicy food. It causes them some pain in their guts. My Korean mother-in-law was raised on spicy foods and garlic. Towards the end of her life, she mostly ate oatmeal and papaya. My job was to cook the oatmeal in the morning. I added a good amount of sugar to her batch.
Bruce 3.1
2021-07-30 05:56:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 22:23:10 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.1
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
Old folks start having problems with eating spicy food. It causes them some pain in their guts. My Korean mother-in-law was raised on spicy foods and garlic. Towards the end of her life, she mostly ate oatmeal and papaya. My job was to cook the oatmeal in the morning. I added a good amount of sugar to her batch.
You're an American after all :)
Cindy Hamilton
2021-07-30 09:17:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 22:23:10 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.1
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
Old folks start having problems with eating spicy food. It causes them some pain in their guts. My Korean mother-in-law was raised on spicy foods and garlic. Towards the end of her life, she mostly ate oatmeal and papaya. My job was to cook the oatmeal in the morning. I added a good amount of sugar to her batch.
You're an American after all :)
Do you have that on some sort of script that posts every time the string
"sugar" appears in a post?

His mother-in-law was Korean. Presumably if she didn't want sugar in
her oatmeal, she would have said so.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce 3.1
2021-07-30 09:32:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Jul 2021 02:17:41 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 22:23:10 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.1
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
Old folks start having problems with eating spicy food. It causes them some pain in their guts. My Korean mother-in-law was raised on spicy foods and garlic. Towards the end of her life, she mostly ate oatmeal and papaya. My job was to cook the oatmeal in the morning. I added a good amount of sugar to her batch.
You're an American after all :)
Do you have that on some sort of script that posts every time the string "sugar" appears in a post?
lol
His mother-in-law was Korean.
But dsi1, who prepared the slop, is American.
Presumably if she didn't want sugar in her oatmeal, she would have said so.
Maybe she was gone with the fairies and couldn't object anymore.
dsi1
2021-07-30 17:41:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 22:23:10 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.1
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
Old folks start having problems with eating spicy food. It causes them some pain in their guts. My Korean mother-in-law was raised on spicy foods and garlic. Towards the end of her life, she mostly ate oatmeal and papaya. My job was to cook the oatmeal in the morning. I added a good amount of sugar to her batch.
You're an American after all :)
That's an ignorant thing to say. You've never taken care of the young or the elderly. Yoose must be da kine.
Bruce 3.1
2021-07-30 19:43:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Jul 2021 10:41:22 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 22:23:10 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.1
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
Old folks start having problems with eating spicy food. It causes them some pain in their guts. My Korean mother-in-law was raised on spicy foods and garlic. Towards the end of her life, she mostly ate oatmeal and papaya. My job was to cook the oatmeal in the morning. I added a good amount of sugar to her batch.
You're an American after all :)
That's an ignorant thing to say. You've never taken care of the young or the elderly. Yoose must be da kine.
Sorry, I don't speak Mexican.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-07-30 09:15:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:37:54 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
He was being sarcastic.

I've always been a salt fiend. Always eaten the salt out of the bottom
of the pretzel bag.

Cindy Hamilton
jmcquown
2021-07-30 13:19:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:37:54 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
He was being sarcastic.
I've always been a salt fiend. Always eaten the salt out of the bottom
of the pretzel bag.
Cindy Hamilton
I eat the salt from the bottom of the pretzel bag, too. When I was a
kid I used to pour salt into my hand and eat it. My mother was
concerned and asked the pediatrician about it. He said it's not a
problem, some people crave salt because their bodies are saying you need
a little more sodium. I've always had low blood pressure so the sodium
thing doesn't concern me. I don't add more salt to salted butter, but I
cook with unsalted butter, either. And some food does require salt
added during cooking. Sprinkling salt from a shaker after it is cooked
just doesn't cut it.

Jill
bruce bowser
2021-07-30 17:01:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:37:54 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
He was being sarcastic.
I've always been a salt fiend. Always eaten the salt out of the bottom
of the pretzel bag.
Cindy Hamilton
I eat the salt from the bottom of the pretzel bag, too. When I was a
kid I used to pour salt into my hand and eat it. My mother was
concerned and asked the pediatrician about it. He said it's not a
problem, some people crave salt because their bodies are saying you need
a little more sodium. I've always had low blood pressure so the sodium
thing doesn't concern me. I don't add more salt to salted butter, but I
cook with unsalted butter, either. And some food does require salt
added during cooking. Sprinkling salt from a shaker after it is cooked
just doesn't cut it.
If you are very, very careful, then adding a pinch of salt to ice cream, cheese cake, other kinds of cake is also tasty
dsi1
2021-07-30 17:45:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:37:54 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant. I find it simple
enough to sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt on butter when desired...
the larger crystals on the surface give a bigger burst of saltiness
with less salt than using butter that contains salt.
How nice for you. I buy salted butter and then sprinkle on more salt.
Old people need more salt.
I've heard that - something about losing taste as you age. Isn't
Sheldon older than Cindy? It sounds like a taste ordeal. I don't mean
an issue with taste, but in this case, but personal taste. I like the
salted butter personally, but any more salt would be too much.
He was being sarcastic.
I've always been a salt fiend. Always eaten the salt out of the bottom
of the pretzel bag.
Cindy Hamilton
I eat the salt from the bottom of the pretzel bag, too. When I was a
kid I used to pour salt into my hand and eat it. My mother was
concerned and asked the pediatrician about it. He said it's not a
problem, some people crave salt because their bodies are saying you need
a little more sodium. I've always had low blood pressure so the sodium
thing doesn't concern me. I don't add more salt to salted butter, but I
cook with unsalted butter, either. And some food does require salt
added during cooking. Sprinkling salt from a shaker after it is cooked
just doesn't cut it.
If you are very, very careful, then adding a pinch of salt to ice cream, cheese cake, other kinds of cake is also tasty
I can't think of anything that you'd cook without any salt. You need salt for your taste buds to function.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-07-30 17:58:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
I can't think of anything that you'd cook without any salt. You need salt
for your taste buds to function.
No, you don't. Do you put salt on any fresh fruit that you might eat?

In the absence of salt, you can still taste sweet, sour, and bitter. Sugar,
citric acid, and unsweetened cocoa can be used to verify this.

Cindy Hamilton
dsi1
2021-07-30 18:11:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
I can't think of anything that you'd cook without any salt. You need salt
for your taste buds to function.
No, you don't. Do you put salt on any fresh fruit that you might eat?
In the absence of salt, you can still taste sweet, sour, and bitter. Sugar,
citric acid, and unsweetened cocoa can be used to verify this.
Cindy Hamilton
If I cooked the fruit, I'd add some salt. There are a lot of people that would cook something without any salt. I ain't one of them. OTOH, there's probably something that I'd cook without salt but I'd need a while to think of what that might be.
Dave Smith
2021-07-30 18:37:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by dsi1
I can't think of anything that you'd cook without any salt. You need salt
for your taste buds to function.
No, you don't. Do you put salt on any fresh fruit that you might eat?
When I was a kid we used to sprinkle a little salt on cantaloupe.
Post by Cindy Hamilton
In the absence of salt, you can still taste sweet, sour, and bitter. Sugar,
citric acid, and unsweetened cocoa can be used to verify this.
Of course you can. There are different taste receptors for those
characteristics.
Bruce 3.1
2021-07-30 19:51:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Jul 2021 14:32:22 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by dsi1
Post by bruce bowser
If you are very, very careful, then adding a pinch of salt to ice cream, cheese cake, other kinds of cake is also tasty
I can't think of anything that you'd cook without any salt. You need salt for your taste buds to function.
I cook a lot of things without salt because I was put on a reduced
sodium diet. I use lots of herbs and spices to make up for the lack of
salt.
If you lose a leg, you may use a wooden leg instead. But you don't go
recommending wooden legs to people with two legs.

Michael Trew
2021-07-30 05:05:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
I only buy unsalted butter, since there are no regulations about how
much salt butter can contain I find most brands contain too much salt
for my taste, nor is the amount of salt consistant.
I usually buy the salted variety since it keep it in a butter bell type
dish at room temperature on the counter; it keeps longer that way out of
the fridge with salt. Good enough for toast, and works OK with most
baking as long as you omit the salt in the recipe for cookies or whatever.
Loading...