Discussion:
[OT] Smoke!
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Leonard Blaisdell
2021-08-24 02:13:50 UTC
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We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.

leo
Ed Pawlowski
2021-08-24 02:32:35 UTC
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Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
Look at the benefits. If you want to smoke a ham, just poke it with a
long stick and stand it out in the backyard a bit.
Sqwertz
2021-08-24 04:21:54 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
Look at the benefits. If you want to smoke a ham, just poke it with a
long stick and stand it out in the backyard a bit.
It's mostly pines, junipers, firs, and cedars.

I hope they at least have the foresight to replant with just post
oak, hickory, pecan, and alder this time. Obviously those others
are a fire hazard - sheesh.

-sw
Graham
2021-08-24 03:13:37 UTC
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Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-24 03:41:29 UTC
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Post by Graham
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
That looks bad. I wonder how close the fire is. We evacuated a lot of
our stuff when the fire was at 23 km/15 miles and the local fire chief
said "It won't be here tomorrow morning but get ready for it".
Michael Trew
2021-08-25 16:06:53 UTC
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Post by Bruce 3.1
Post by Graham
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
That looks bad. I wonder how close the fire is. We evacuated a lot of
our stuff when the fire was at 23 km/15 miles and the local fire chief
said "It won't be here tomorrow morning but get ready for it".
Where did you take your stuff?
In 2008, we had a 4 month long fire in the Great Dismal Swamp. It wasn't
a raging forest fire but an underground smoldering fire.
Lots of the above-water land has peat moss and that was what was
burning....underground.
Only about 20 miles southwest of me and all summer the winds come from
the southwest. It was a real mess breathing that smoke all summer long.
As it was underground, no way to fight it and put it out.
We got a few close hurricanes in September and all the rain from those
storms finally saturated the ground enough and put out the fire.
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania

Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
i***@webtv.net
2021-08-25 21:39:52 UTC
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Permalink
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at, but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Graham
2021-08-25 21:52:34 UTC
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Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at, but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-25 21:58:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by i***@webtv.net
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at, but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
What I like about Bill Bryson is that he's an American but, having
lived abroad a lot, can look at his own country like a foreigner as
well. That can be very funny.
Gary
2021-08-26 11:56:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by i***@webtv.net
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at, but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)

For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
Michael Trew
2021-08-27 02:31:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at,
but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)
For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
I've never heard of it, but that sounds interesting.
Ed Pawlowski
2021-08-27 03:12:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Graham
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at,
but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)
For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
I've never heard of it, but that sounds interesting.
The entire trail is 2190 miles and I can proudly say I walked a portion
of it. Many people do it in segments over a few years.

I just did one segment, about 100 yards.
Graham
2021-08-27 03:35:30 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Graham
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at,
but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)
For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
I've never heard of it, but that sounds interesting.
The entire trail is 2190 miles and I can proudly say I walked a portion
of it.  Many people do it in segments over a few years.
I just did one segment, about 100 yards.
Across a parking lot? :-)
Ed Pawlowski
2021-08-27 04:16:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Graham
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at,
but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)
For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
I've never heard of it, but that sounds interesting.
The entire trail is 2190 miles and I can proudly say I walked a
portion of it.  Many people do it in segments over a few years.
I just did one segment, about 100 yards.
Across a parking lot? :-)
It was hot that day and I didn't want to dehydrate and endanger myself.
Gary
2021-08-27 12:49:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Graham
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at,
but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)
For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
I've never heard of it, but that sounds interesting.
The entire trail is 2190 miles and I can proudly say I walked a portion
of it. Many people do it in segments over a few years.
I just did one segment, about 100 yards.
LOL. I also walked it about that far...in Harper's Ferry, WV once.

I have a good friend (in Connecticut) that walked "The 100 mile trail"
in Maine. Took him 3 tries.

- first time was with a friend. His friend died out after the 1st day
and he had to help him back to the start.

- 2nd time was on his own but many storms and rain prevented him from
going too far. (The streams/rivers were too flooded to cross)

- 3rd time was a charm. He did it all alone and sent us many cool pictures.
Dave Smith
2022-01-09 18:06:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 08:23:12 -0800 (PST), bruce bowser
Post by Gary
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Graham
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at,
but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)
For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
I've never heard of it, but that sounds interesting.
The entire trail is 2190 miles and I can proudly say I walked a portion
of it. Many people do it in segments over a few years.
I just did one segment, about 100 yards.
LOL. I also walked it about that far...in Harper's Ferry, WV once.
I have a good friend (in Connecticut) that walked "The 100 mile trail"
in Maine. Took him 3 tries.
- first time was with a friend. His friend died out after the 1st day
and he had to help him back to the start.
- 2nd time was on his own but many storms and rain prevented him from
going too far. (The streams/rivers were too flooded to cross)
--

Can you go into more detail? I don't get it
--
This is NOT a post by Dave Smith
songbird
2022-01-09 19:23:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
... The AT ...
Post by Gary
Post by Graham
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)
For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
i day hiked the entire section through eastern TN.
met a few hikers that were coming through from the
north heading south and they said it was a pretty
tough stretch. in one part i was going at it from
the downhill side one day and stopped about halfway
up the hill and this guy comes along with poles and
backpack and stopped and chatted for a while. then
he went along and i started back up but not too long
after i broke my shoe and that was it for the day.
a few days later i went and parked my car at the
bottom of the section in the road side turnoff and
then walked up the road to the other crossing and
went the downhill route. it still made for a very
long day because when i got down to the road again
i still had to hike back up the road to my car.

between hiking and swimming those few years i was
in great shape.


songbird
Dave Smith
2022-01-09 20:32:07 UTC
Reply
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Post by songbird
... The AT ...
Post by Gary
Post by Graham
Bill Bryson describes the place in "A walk in the woods".
He sure does. I have that book. It's a good one. :)
For others that may not be familiar with it, it's a book about walking
the Appalachian Trail.
i day hiked the entire section through eastern TN.
met a few hikers that were coming through from the
north heading south and they said it was a pretty
tough stretch. in one part i was going at it from
the downhill side one day and stopped about halfway
up the hill and this guy comes along with poles and
backpack and stopped and chatted for a while. then
he went along and i started back up but not too long
after i broke my shoe and that was it for the day.
a few days later i went and parked my car at the
bottom of the section in the road side turnoff and
then walked up the road to the other crossing and
went the downhill route. it still made for a very
long day because when i got down to the road again
i still had to hike back up the road to my car.
between hiking and swimming those few years i was
in great shape.
songbird
Yes. Ghe Ghe Ghe :)))))))))))
--
This is NOT a post by Dave Smith
Michael Trew
2021-08-27 02:31:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years. Some parts of town have plumes
of smoke coming up from the ground. It must be hot there in the summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Some very stubborn people that refuse to leave still live there. The
state tried to enact eminent domain and evict them for years. They
finally settled in court and allowed the now less than one dozen
remaining residents to live out their days in their homes, and the state
gets them through eminent domain after they pass.
I've been there. There's a definite smell when you get close to one of
cracks. It's not a sulphur smell, at least not the place I was at, but one
of hot steam rising like when you iron clothes.
I'd love to see it. Unfortunately, I read in the news last year that
they covered over "Graffiti highway". They blamed "COVID"... "Y'all
can't gather here"... in reality, they wanted any excuse to keep people
away.
bruce bowser
2021-08-25 21:54:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
Post by Graham
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
That looks bad. I wonder how close the fire is. We evacuated a lot of
our stuff when the fire was at 23 km/15 miles and the local fire chief
said "It won't be here tomorrow morning but get ready for it".
Where did you take your stuff?
In 2008, we had a 4 month long fire in the Great Dismal Swamp. It wasn't
a raging forest fire but an underground smoldering fire.
Lots of the above-water land has peat moss and that was what was
burning....underground.
Only about 20 miles southwest of me and all summer the winds come from
the southwest. It was a real mess breathing that smoke all summer long.
As it was underground, no way to fight it and put it out.
We got a few close hurricanes in September and all the rain from those
storms finally saturated the ground enough and put out the fire.
Something like that is going on in Centralia, PA since at least 1962. A
dump fire (purposefully lit) caught an abandoned unsealed underground
coal mine on fire. The town is still on fire underground, and estimated
that it could be for hundreds of years.
And if that wasn't Pennsylvania's worst, guess what? The uranium under the Susquehanna at 3 mile island is still burning (barely) out of control.
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-25 18:59:52 UTC
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Post by Bruce 3.1
That looks bad. I wonder how close the fire is. We evacuated a lot of
our stuff when the fire was at 23 km/15 miles and the local fire chief
said "It won't be here tomorrow morning but get ready for it".
Where did you take your stuff?
To my parents-in-law. It turned out that the fire never got closer
than those 23 kms/15 miles. The wind direction saved us.
In 2008, we had a 4 month long fire in the Great Dismal Swamp. It wasn't
a raging forest fire but an underground smoldering fire.
Lots of the above-water land has peat moss and that was what was
burning....underground.
Only about 20 miles southwest of me and all summer the winds come from
the southwest. It was a real mess breathing that smoke all summer long.
As it was underground, no way to fight it and put it out.
We got a few close hurricanes in September and all the rain from those
storms finally saturated the ground enough and put out the fire.
One natural disaster ending another.
GM
2021-08-24 04:12:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
Wow a post from Graham that doesn't blame Trump...!!!
--
GM
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-24 04:20:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 21:12:28 -0700 (PDT), GM
Post by GM
Post by Graham
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
Wow a post from Graham that doesn't blame Trump...!!!
Trump contributed to all those fires.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-08-24 09:31:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 21:12:28 -0700 (PDT), GM
Post by Graham
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
Wow a post from Graham that doesn't blame Trump...!!!
Trump contributed to all those fires.
If only he had raked the forests. Lazy bastard.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-24 11:07:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 02:31:14 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 21:12:28 -0700 (PDT), GM
Post by Graham
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
Wow a post from Graham that doesn't blame Trump...!!!
Trump contributed to all those fires.
If only he had raked the forests. Lazy bastard.
He didn't give a shit about the environment.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-08-25 19:27:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 02:31:14 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 21:12:28 -0700 (PDT), GM
Post by Graham
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
Wow a post from Graham that doesn't blame Trump...!!!
Trump contributed to all those fires.
If only he had raked the forests. Lazy bastard.
He didn't give a shit about the environment.
I was being sarcastic. His response to wildfires in California in 2018:

“You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the forests, it’s very important,” Trump said amid the charred ruins of Paradise — his first stop on the tour.

Trump went on to explain that the president of Finland, whom he met on an overseas trip a week earlier, told him about raking the forest floors. “He called it a forest nation,” Trump said, “and they spent a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t have any problem.”

He didn't even bother to find out that the California fires were not in forests, but
were brush fires. Typical of him. Anything outside his own experience
pretty much doesn't exist.

Of course, Finland is nothing like California, as the Finns were quick to
point out on social media.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-25 19:47:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Aug 2021 12:27:41 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 02:31:14 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
If only he had raked the forests. Lazy bastard.
He didn't give a shit about the environment.
“You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the forests, it’s very important,” Trump said amid the charred ruins of Paradise — his first stop on the tour.
Trump went on to explain that the president of Finland, whom he met on an overseas trip a week earlier, told him about raking the forest floors. “He called it a forest nation,” Trump said, “and they spent a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t have any problem.”
He didn't even bother to find out that the California fires were not in forests, but
were brush fires. Typical of him. Anything outside his own experience
pretty much doesn't exist.
Of course, Finland is nothing like California, as the Finns were quick to
point out on social media.
Trump's ignorance was embarrassing but also entertaining :)
Graham
2021-08-25 21:42:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Wed, 25 Aug 2021 12:27:41 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 02:31:14 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
If only he had raked the forests. Lazy bastard.
He didn't give a shit about the environment.
“You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the forests, it’s very important,” Trump said amid the charred ruins of Paradise — his first stop on the tour.
Trump went on to explain that the president of Finland, whom he met on an overseas trip a week earlier, told him about raking the forest floors. “He called it a forest nation,” Trump said, “and they spent a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t have any problem.”
He didn't even bother to find out that the California fires were not in forests, but
were brush fires. Typical of him. Anything outside his own experience
pretty much doesn't exist.
Of course, Finland is nothing like California, as the Finns were quick to
point out on social media.
Trump's ignorance was embarrassing but also entertaining :)
Only if you like cringe comedy!
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-25 21:55:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Wed, 25 Aug 2021 12:27:41 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
“You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the forests, it’s very important,” Trump said amid the charred ruins of Paradise — his first stop on the tour.
Trump went on to explain that the president of Finland, whom he met on an overseas trip a week earlier, told him about raking the forest floors. “He called it a forest nation,” Trump said, “and they spent a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t have any problem.”
He didn't even bother to find out that the California fires were not in forests, but
were brush fires. Typical of him. Anything outside his own experience
pretty much doesn't exist.
Of course, Finland is nothing like California, as the Finns were quick to
point out on social media.
Trump's ignorance was embarrassing but also entertaining :)
Only if you like cringe comedy!
Yes. I loved it when he was ad libbing. He never had the faintest clue
what he was talking about, but that didn't stop him :)
Graham
2021-08-25 22:09:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
Post by Graham
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Wed, 25 Aug 2021 12:27:41 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
“You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the forests, it’s very important,” Trump said amid the charred ruins of Paradise — his first stop on the tour.
Trump went on to explain that the president of Finland, whom he met on an overseas trip a week earlier, told him about raking the forest floors. “He called it a forest nation,” Trump said, “and they spent a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t have any problem.”
He didn't even bother to find out that the California fires were not in forests, but
were brush fires. Typical of him. Anything outside his own experience
pretty much doesn't exist.
Of course, Finland is nothing like California, as the Finns were quick to
point out on social media.
Trump's ignorance was embarrassing but also entertaining :)
Only if you like cringe comedy!
Yes. I loved it when he was ad libbing. He never had the faintest clue
what he was talking about, but that didn't stop him :)
SPECTATOR US:
By Roger Kimball

President Ice Cream’s Afghan meltdown

There is quite a lot of that Yes-No, Did-Didn’t, whiplashing these days

"'You have to hand it to the Taliban (or, if you are Joe Biden, the ‘Tally-bahn’): they are
both a persistent and an infernally clever lot.

As to their persistence, recall that George W. Bush assured us that, ‘thanks to our
military, our allies, and the brave fighters of Afghanistan…the Taliban regime is
coming to an end.’ That was in December 2001.

As of August 2021, they control the country and are as I write issuing ultimatums
to the President of the United States: everybody out by September 11, no, make that
August 31 — otherwise, there will be ‘consequences’.

There does seem to be a communications breakdown about radical elements in Afghanistan.

A few days ago, President Ice Cream said that al-Qaeda was ‘gone’ from Afghanistan, ergo
(he did not say ‘ergo’) we had no reasons to be there, getting al-Qaeda after the terrorist
attacks of 9/11 having been the original rationale for going into that godforsaken
country in the first place.

Alas, just a few hours later that day, the Pentagon spokesman John ‘no imminent threat’ Kirby
acknowledged that ‘al-Qaeda is a presence as well as Isis’ throughout Afghanistan.

There is quite a lot of that Yes-No, Did-Didn’t, whiplashing these days. Jen Psaki, the
President’s press secretary, told us that no Americans were ‘stranded’ in Afghanistan,
adding for good moralistic measure that it was ‘irresponsible’ to suggest such a thing.

Many observers close to the situation have a different assessment of what will happen; said
one, ‘it is unavoidable that Americans, Green Card holders and those who worked with us will be
left behind’. Hard cheese on those folks, but, as always, the Babylon Bee distributes solace,
explaining that ‘Americans Trapped By Taliban With No Rescue Plan Happy To Hear
They Are Not Stranded’.

Well, that’s what we used to call black humor in a satirical paper. For the people actually on
the ground, there is not a lot of humor. According to NBC,

‘Staffers reported being jostled, hit, spat on and cursed at by Taliban fighters at checkpoints
near the airport, it said, adding that criminals were taking advantage of the chaos while the
US military tried to maintain order “in an extremely physical situation”. Some staff members
reported that they were almost separated from their children, while others collapsed in a crush
of people and had to be taken to hospitals with injuries, the cable said. Others said they had
collapsed on the road because of heat exhaustion, it said. “It would be better to die under
the Taliban’s bullet” than face the crowds again, a staff member was quoted as saying in the cable.’

Everyone is feeling the strain. Our secretary of state, Anthony ‘Winkin and Blinkin’, for example,
could not remember who the departed president of Afghanistan was, confusing former
president Hamid Karzai with President Ashraf ‘Skedaddle’ Ghani. Here’s how to tell the
difference, President Ghani, who is now swanning around the United Arab Emirates, is
the one who left with $169 million of your tax dollars stuffed into bags, though to be
fair no one has counted the lucre Karzai may have appropriated in his 14 years in office.

No, like the poor according to the Gospel, it looks like we’ll have the Taliban (and maybe al-Qaeda
and Isis) always with us. It’s a good thing, then, isn’t it (is it?) that the organization seems
to be burnishing its image. Joe Biden likes ice cream. It turns out that the Taliban does too,
and we have the pictures to prove it. (I wonder what the Pashto word for ‘troll’ is?).

We have also just learned that Sharia loving group wants to take a bigger role on the
international stage, helping, for instance, to tackle the burning issue of climate change.
And you’ll be pleased to hear that the fancy-head-gear chaps can multitask, battling climate
change even as they execute wayward citizens and hustle women back into burqas.
Of course, it’s not only fancy head gear that the Taliban has to conjure these days.
Thanks to the generosity — never call it scandalous incompetence — of the US government,
we have bequeathed the Taliban hundreds of millions of dollars worth of grade-A military
hardware, making them ‘the most armed militant group today’ (actually, the most armed
in history). A partial inventory of our largess, not to say stupidity, includes 23 A-29 combat
aircraft. ($22.25 million a pop), three C-130 transport planes ($14 million each), and 33 H-60
Blackhawk helicopters ($6 million each). Then there are the 170 armored Humvees ($41.5 million),
thousand upon thousands of rockets and grenades and nearly a million rounds
of .50 caliber ammunition.

Why doesn’t Joe Biden just tell them to give all that stuff back, or else? Because Joe Biden
is not former Navy SEAL Jocko Willink. I wish he were, and I wish he’d say what Jocko says here..."

https://www.instagram.com/tv/CS7wqiBJG6Z/?utm_source=ig_embed&ig_rid=13d4bdc6-792d-4c6e-ada9-cf9809941ce7

</>

By Roger Kimball

Roger Kimball is the editor and publisher of The New Criterion, publisher of Encounter Books
and a contributing editor of The Spectator.
jmcquown
2021-08-26 00:06:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Wed, 25 Aug 2021 12:27:41 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 02:31:14 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
If only he had raked the forests. Lazy bastard.
He didn't give a shit about the environment.
“You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the
forests, it’s very important,” Trump said amid the charred ruins of
Paradise — his first stop on the tour.
Trump went on to explain that the president of Finland, whom he met
on an overseas trip a week earlier, told him about raking the forest
floors. “He called it a forest nation,” Trump said, “and they spent a
lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t
have any problem.”
He didn't even bother to find out that the California fires were not in forests, but
were brush fires.  Typical of him.  Anything outside his own experience
pretty much doesn't exist.
Of course, Finland is nothing like California, as the Finns were quick to
point out on social media.
Trump's ignorance was embarrassing but also entertaining :)
Only if you like cringe comedy!
Bruce loves any reason to bash the US so why not give him Trump? I
think Trump should establish a campaign office and stop in Australia, to
help build his claims of worldwide support. Maybe build a desert type
resort with some swimming pools and a golf course. Get a bunch of his
cronies to go there on his campaign stop near where Bruce lives. You
know, to spruce up the economy. Hire some locals. *They* could have
MUZAK piped in playing 'Waltzing Matilda'. Or "Men at Work" 'Who Can it
Be Now." *That* would be entertaining! :)

Jill
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-26 00:13:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by jmcquown
Post by Graham
Post by Bruce 3.1
Trump's ignorance was embarrassing but also entertaining :)
Only if you like cringe comedy!
Bruce loves any reason to bash the US so why not give him Trump? I
think Trump should establish a campaign office and stop in Australia, to
help build his claims of worldwide support. Maybe build a desert type
resort with some swimming pools and a golf course. Get a bunch of his
cronies to go there on his campaign stop near where Bruce lives. You
know, to spruce up the economy. Hire some locals. *They* could have
MUZAK piped in playing 'Waltzing Matilda'. Or "Men at Work" 'Who Can it
Be Now." *That* would be entertaining! :)
Sounds like a plan to me! The more I hear from Trump's views on life,
the universe and everything else, the better! I could be Trump's local
driver. I don't often forget to drive on the left side of the road
anymore!
Michael Trew
2021-08-27 02:32:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Wed, 25 Aug 2021 12:27:41 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Tue, 24 Aug 2021 02:31:14 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
If only he had raked the forests. Lazy bastard.
He didn't give a shit about the environment.
“You’ve got to take care of the floors. You know the floors of the
forests, it’s very important,” Trump said amid the charred ruins of
Paradise — his first stop on the tour.
Trump went on to explain that the president of Finland, whom he met
on an overseas trip a week earlier, told him about raking the forest
floors. “He called it a forest nation,” Trump said, “and they spent a
lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things, and they don’t
have any problem.”
He didn't even bother to find out that the California fires were not in forests, but
were brush fires. Typical of him. Anything outside his own experience
pretty much doesn't exist.
Of course, Finland is nothing like California, as the Finns were quick to
point out on social media.
Trump's ignorance was embarrassing but also entertaining :)
Only if you like cringe comedy!
That's RFC... lol
Gary
2021-08-25 12:42:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 21:12:28 -0700 (PDT), GM
Post by GM
Post by Graham
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
Wow a post from Graham that doesn't blame Trump...!!!
Trump contributed to all those fires.
And now, so has Biden.
Silly to blame any president for the annual west coast mess.
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-25 19:03:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Bruce 3.1
On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 21:12:28 -0700 (PDT), GM
Post by GM
Post by Graham
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
Wow a post from Graham that doesn't blame Trump...!!!
Trump contributed to all those fires.
And now, so has Biden.
Silly to blame any president for the annual west coast mess.
Trump didn't care for the environment. Not one bit. Typical
right-winger. Only $$$ matter. That dense attitude's going to cost us
all dearly in the longer term, and not just financially.
John Kuthe
2021-08-25 22:36:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
This was the view from my son's house in BC at 3:30, 4:00 and 4:15 pm a
week ago. Obviously on evacuation alert.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/zV9tD9k
THAT is a sign to GTFO! Fast!

A-FIRE is a-coming


John Kuthe, RN, BSN...
Bruce 3.1
2021-08-24 03:33:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 24 Aug 2021 02:13:50 GMT, Leonard Blaisdell
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
Terrible. I remember how it was here a year and a half ago or however
long it is. Bad for people with breathing problems.
Leonard Blaisdell
2021-08-24 04:34:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.1
Terrible. I remember how it was here a year and a half ago or however
long it is. Bad for people with breathing problems.
A year and a half sounds good. I remember the "Hell in Australia" fires.
Michael Trew
2021-08-24 04:58:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
leo
How sad.. the smoke was so bad at one point, it was hazy here. I saw a
picture of NYC hazy from western fires not long ago. It has cleared up
here.
bruce bowser
2021-08-25 21:51:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Leonard Blaisdell
We have occasionally had smoky skies for a month. There are many
California fires and the general wind is a west wind. The second largest
in California history is about thirty miles north as the crow flies.
Yesterday and today have been particularly bad. There hasn't been a sign
of the Sun. My Apple Watch gives 79 degrees and smoky right now.
Since the sun has disappeared for a couple of days, I mowed the lawn. It
doesn't smell that bad, but there's a haze looking down the street.
Think of the mild smell of a neighbor's barbecue, only slightly less,
without the meat. Many have lost their homes. Some have lost their
town.
When has California *not* been like that?
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