Discussion:
Döner kebab meat
(too old to reply)
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 20:35:54 UTC
Permalink
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.

Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?

Any tips or recipes?

Thank you.
kilikini
2008-08-20 21:08:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.

Seasonings for Lamb:
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 tsps. dried oregano leaves, crushed
1 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. pepper

Cucumber Yogurt Sauce:
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar

Wrap it up in a pita, add some tomatoes, onions or lettuce if you want.

kili
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 21:24:40 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:08:20 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 tsps. dried oregano leaves, crushed
1 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. pepper
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Wrap it up in a pita, add some tomatoes, onions or lettuce if you want.
kili
Many thanks for that, Kili!

How about cooking the lamb? Oven cook or grill (broil)?
kilikini
2008-08-20 21:40:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:08:20 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as
Gyros meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 tsps. dried oregano leaves, crushed
1 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. pepper
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Wrap it up in a pita, add some tomatoes, onions or lettuce if you want.
kili
Many thanks for that, Kili!
How about cooking the lamb? Oven cook or grill (broil)?
Personally, I'd grill it.

kili
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 21:58:24 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:40:11 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:08:20 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as
Gyros meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 tsps. dried oregano leaves, crushed
1 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. pepper
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Wrap it up in a pita, add some tomatoes, onions or lettuce if you want.
kili
Many thanks for that, Kili!
How about cooking the lamb? Oven cook or grill (broil)?
Personally, I'd grill it.
kili
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
kilikini
2008-08-20 22:11:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:40:11 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
How about cooking the lamb? Oven cook or grill (broil)?
Personally, I'd grill it.
kili
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
I'd just grill it. Some recipes call for ground meat, some use strips of
meat. Gogu claims traditional is made with pork, either way, lamb or pork,
I'd grill it. I've just never heard of a pork Gyro before. I've been
schooled!

kili
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 23:35:09 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 18:11:02 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:40:11 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
How about cooking the lamb? Oven cook or grill (broil)?
Personally, I'd grill it.
kili
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
I'd just grill it. Some recipes call for ground meat, some use strips of
meat. Gogu claims traditional is made with pork, either way, lamb or pork,
I'd grill it. I've just never heard of a pork Gyro before. I've been
schooled!
kili
That's what I like about it all, learning something new!
kilikini
2008-08-20 23:44:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 18:11:02 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:40:11 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
How about cooking the lamb? Oven cook or grill (broil)?
Personally, I'd grill it.
kili
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
I'd just grill it. Some recipes call for ground meat, some use
strips of meat. Gogu claims traditional is made with pork, either
way, lamb or pork, I'd grill it. I've just never heard of a pork
Gyro before. I've been schooled!
kili
That's what I like about it all, learning something new!
Me too, Corey.

kili
choro
2008-08-21 02:06:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:40:11 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
How about cooking the lamb? Oven cook or grill (broil)?
Personally, I'd grill it.
kili
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
I'd just grill it. Some recipes call for ground meat, some use strips of
meat. Gogu claims traditional is made with pork, either way, lamb or pork,
I'd grill it. I've just never heard of a pork Gyro before. I've been
schooled!
kili
Of course you haven't heard of gyro made of pork because gyro is a
direct translation of the Turkish word döner which means rotating...
reference to the traditionally horizontally rotating spit which nowadays
is usually rotates in an upright position. I personally prefer to screw
my woman in the horizontal position though the upright position has got
some things going for it, I must say.

Another word for Döner is Çecirme (literally "that which is
turned/turned over/rotated")which has been corrupted to Shawarma in some
Middle Eastern countries.

A dish does not become Greek just by translating the original name for
it into Greek.

We have a famous saying in Turkish "Çevir de kaz yandi" which literally
means "Rotate it; the goose has got burnt." !
--
choro
*****
gogu
2008-08-21 07:50:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:40:11 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
How about cooking the lamb? Oven cook or grill (broil)?
Personally, I'd grill it.
kili
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
I'd just grill it. Some recipes call for ground meat, some use strips of
meat. Gogu claims traditional is made with pork, either way, lamb or
pork, I'd grill it. I've just never heard of a pork Gyro before. I've
been schooled!
kili
Of course you haven't heard of gyro made of pork because gyro is a direct
translation of the Turkish word döner which means rotating... reference to
the traditionally horizontally rotating spit which nowadays is usually
rotates in an upright position.
I personally prefer to screw my woman in the horizontal position though
the upright position has got some things going for it, I must say.
GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Another word for Döner is Çecirme (literally "that which is turned/turned
over/rotated")which has been corrupted to Shawarma in some Middle Eastern
countries.
A dish does not become Greek just by translating the original name for it
into Greek.
We have a famous saying in Turkish "Çevir de kaz yandi" which literally
means "Rotate it; the goose has got burnt." !
--
choro
*****
Vilco
2008-08-21 13:08:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Another word for Döner is Çecirme (literally "that which is
turned/turned over/rotated")which has been corrupted to Shawarma in
some Middle Eastern countries.
Many thanks Choro, I finally learnt what did "shawarma" or "shoarma"
mean on the ensign of Amsterdam kebab shops. They looked to be
indonesian shops, an ex colony of Holland. Maybe the word "shawarma"
is used also there.
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 13:19:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vilco
Another word for Dφner is Ηecirme (literally "that which is
turned/turned over/rotated")which has been corrupted to Shawarma in
some Middle Eastern countries.
Many thanks Choro, I finally learnt what did "shawarma" or "shoarma"
mean on the ensign of Amsterdam kebab shops. They looked to be
indonesian shops, an ex colony of Holland. Maybe the word "shawarma"
is used also there.
If you think you want to actually "talk" to this Turkish piece of shit whom
EVERYONE in scg considers a slimy, perverted, disgusting troll, please leave
out scg and post to soc.culture.turkish instead, where any "conversation"
regarding this troll belongs!

SCT included and f'up set.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
choro
2008-08-21 13:26:21 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for your response. Glad to know that I have helped somebody
understand the word Shawarma. I always say that you don't know a word until
you have learned its etymology.

Actually I made a typing error in my previous posting and mis-spelt Çevirme
as Çecirme -- typing c instead of v in the second syllable.

However, I did spell it or rather the root word "Çevir" correctly in the
last para when I quoted that old Turkish saying.
--
choro
*****
Post by Vilco
Post by choro
Another word for Döner is Çecirme (literally "that which is
turned/turned over/rotated")which has been corrupted to Shawarma in
some Middle Eastern countries.
Many thanks Choro, I finally learnt what did "shawarma" or "shoarma"
mean on the ensign of Amsterdam kebab shops. They looked to be
indonesian shops, an ex colony of Holland. Maybe the word "shawarma"
is used also there.
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
Dave Smith
2008-08-21 01:27:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
That is what most of the online recipes suggest. I have done it several
times and it is delicious.
choro
2008-08-21 02:20:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Corey Richardson
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
That is what most of the online recipes suggest. I have done it several
times and it is delicious.
You should never ever roast or grill meat and then re-grill it after
cooling it down. Meat is always at its tenderest, juiciest when eaten as
soon as it has been grilled. Large roasted joints should be allowed to
cool a bit, yes. That's what they call resting the joint. But small
individual size portions are best eaten as soon as they are cooked.

Meat loaf? What is THAT! 'Orrible stuff!!! That's one way to destroy
good meat or rather mince.

But home-made burgers which really are nothing more than flattened
köfte? Now you are talking!!!

Incidentally, köfte doesn't become Greek either just by changing its
spelling and writing it as 'kioftedes' with the obligatory -des ending
to make it Greek. Have you tried "Shish köfte" on those wide skewers
with the minced lamb prepared with all the right spices and herbs? YUMMY!

Have you ever tried the other version, the Sheftali kebab (Sheftalia in
Greek) -- köfte mince wrapped up in a special thin fatty membrane from
the lamb's belly and grilled over charcoal? DOUBLE YUMMY!
--
choro
*****
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 11:25:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Corey Richardson
I think so too. I was considering cooking the lamb like a meat loaf,
allowing to cool and then cooling and grilling it. Good or bad idea?
That is what most of the online recipes suggest. I have done it several
times and it is delicious.
You should never ever roast or grill meat and then re-grill it after
<snip the usual endless blather>

Still spreading your stench in European newsgroups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
Vilco
2008-08-21 13:13:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
But home-made burgers which really are nothing more than flattened
köfte? Now you are talking!!!
They call it "Kofta" in the moroccan-run kebab shops here (norhtern
Italy).
Post by choro
Have you tried "Shish köfte" on those wide skewers
with the minced lamb prepared with all the right spices and herbs? YUMMY!
I've seen the word "shish" in many occasions, usually associated with
kebab: IIRC that should be the kabab lamb meat on wooden sticks, isn't
it? So you have doner which is the one ade on the spinning stick ans
shish which is the one you make on wooden sticksm, am I right?

BTW - in Italy some kabab place is starting to use "piadina" instead
of the usual doner-kabab bread, and it goes wonderfully ;)
Moreover piadina, as many other italian flat breads, derives straight
from turkish "pita": nothing new under the sun
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 13:22:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vilco
Post by choro
But home-made burgers which really are nothing more than flattened
kφfte? Now you are talking!!!
They call it "Kofta" in the moroccan-run kebab shops here (norhtern
Italy).
Post by choro
Have you tried "Shish kφfte" on those wide skewers
with the minced lamb prepared with all the right spices and herbs? YUMMY!
I've seen the word "shish" in many occasions, usually associated with
kebab: IIRC that should be the kabab lamb meat on wooden sticks, isn't
it? So you have doner which is the one ade on the spinning stick ans
shish which is the one you make on wooden sticksm, am I right?
BTW - in Italy some kabab place is starting to use "piadina" instead
of the usual doner-kabab bread, and it goes wonderfully ;)
Moreover piadina, as many other italian flat breads, derives straight
from turkish "pita": nothing new under the sun
Any "conversation" with this Turkish swine belong in soc.culture.turkish!

So LEAVE OUT soc.culture.greek, NEXT TIME, Vilco!

SCT included and f'up set!
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
choro
2008-08-21 14:07:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vilco
Post by choro
But home-made burgers which really are nothing more than flattened
köfte? Now you are talking!!!
They call it "Kofta" in the moroccan-run kebab shops here (norhtern
Italy).
Quite often Arabs use the letter a, Turks use the letter e. Thus köfte
becomes köfta and since the Turkish letter ö (the double dotted o) sound
does not exist in some other languges like Arabic, Greek etc it is
conveniently represented by the undotted o. Germans use oe diphthong but I
believe the actually DO have a letter for that sound.
Post by Vilco
Post by choro
Have you tried "Shish köfte" on those wide skewers
with the minced lamb prepared with all the right spices and herbs? YUMMY!
I've seen the word "shish" in many occasions, usually associated with
kebab: IIRC that should be the kabab lamb meat on wooden sticks, isn't
it? So you have doner which is the one ade on the spinning stick ans
shish which is the one you make on wooden sticksm, am I right?
Shish, nowadays usually made of stainless steel, is THE proper skewer to
use. Its advantage over wooden skewers is that metal is a good conductor of
heat and therefore heats the meat from the inside as well. Moreover metal
skewers last a lifetime or more whereas wooden skewers that you discard
after use are NOT an ecologically sound alternative.
Post by Vilco
BTW - in Italy some kabab place is starting to use "piadina" instead
of the usual doner-kabab bread, and it goes wonderfully ;)
Moreover piadina, as many other italian flat breads, derives straight
from turkish "pita": nothing new under the sun
Thanks for the info. This is the first time I hear the word "piadina". I'll
look into it when I get the time and the opportunity as I believe in finding
the etymology of words. You are most probably right; there is nothing new
under the sun.

Italian pizza for example is nothing but just the Italian version of the
Lahmacun (pronounced Lahmajoun). And Italian pasta is, of course, derived
from the Chinese noodles. Spaghetti for example is nothing more than thicker
than usual Chinese noodles. I like to pull people's legs and sometimes tell
them that Spaghetti Bolognese was Nero's favorite dish!! :-)

Most do not get the joke as they don't even know that tomatoes are a crop
imported from the Americas and therefore couldn't have existed in ancient
Rome. Still, I must say that I DO love the Italian cuisine. But why oh why
are Italian preserved meats and Parma Ham so expensive in the UK? Just had
a bite of Parmesan cheese. Lovely. Enjoying the taste it leaves in the
mouth.

Why on earth people buy it ready grated beats me as grating exposes it to
the air which robs the Parmesan of its delicate flavors.

As for Yogurts, I never use yogurt unless I have kept it in the fridge for
at least one month so that the fermenting process has time to multiply the
good bacteria and turn the yogurt slightly sour. And being a Turk I should
know about yogurt which is a Turkish soft cheese, in my humble opinion. It
therefore benefits from 'aging'. And any yogurt that doesn't pass the test,
I never buy again because I know it is NOT true yogurt. Believe it or not
but I have had yogurt that I have aged in the fridge for SIX months. And it
was delicious!

If a yogurt is not a true yogurt, the aluminum seal at the top of the tub
will puff up because of the gases caused by aging. Discard it and never buy
that brand again!
--
choro
*****
Post by Vilco
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
Waldo Centini
2008-08-20 21:27:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
Döner and Shwarma are lamb as well.

At least [being Islamic] they can never be pork.
--
*** Waldo ***
Moderation is for monks.
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 21:36:14 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 23:27:16 +0200, Waldo Centini
Post by Waldo Centini
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
Döner and Shwarma are lamb as well.
At least [being Islamic] they can never be pork.
They're allowed to *sell* food with pork in it though aren't they?
Waldo Centini
2008-08-20 21:42:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by Waldo Centini
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
Döner and Shwarma are lamb as well.
At least [being Islamic] they can never be pork.
They're allowed to *sell* food with pork in it though aren't they?
An Islamic trader is allowed to sell food which contains prok, but not
prepare it.
--
*** Waldo ***
A boy gets to be a man when a man is needed.
Waldo Centini
2008-08-20 21:43:43 UTC
Permalink
prok
Pork, that is.
--
*** Waldo ***
A likely impossibility is always preferable to an unconvincing
possibility.
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 21:46:38 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 23:42:09 +0200, Waldo Centini
Post by Waldo Centini
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by Waldo Centini
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
Döner and Shwarma are lamb as well.
At least [being Islamic] they can never be pork.
They're allowed to *sell* food with pork in it though aren't they?
An Islamic trader is allowed to sell food which contains prok, but not
prepare it.
Is that prepare it, or cook it?

My local fast-food joint is ran by Pakistani Muslims and their menu is
Halal but they'll put bacon on burgers and serve pork hot-dogs.
Vilco
2008-08-21 13:21:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
My local fast-food joint is ran by Pakistani Muslims and their menu is
Halal but they'll put bacon on burgers and serve pork hot-dogs.
Maybe they watered down theyr religiousness? Here in Italy many kabab
shops refuse to sell alcoholic beverages for religious reasons, while
other care less about religion and do sell them. In some shops who
don't sell alcohol you can bring your own beer, while in others you
can not, probably to defend the "purity" of the place for muslims to
eat in it.
After learning this, I always ask for a beer and, if they say they
don't sell it, always ask if I can bring in my own beer while they're
readiyng my kabab, just to abide offending someone's religious
beliefs. And even when they tell me I can bring a beer there, I drink
it only outside and let the beer out on the sidewalk before entering
to get my kebab and pay for it, then get back out and catch up my
beer. I've seen it makes them feel better, probably the ones who let
you bring a beer in are doing it to be kind to you but at the same
time are worrying about what theyr muslim customers will think of it.
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
choro
2008-08-21 14:17:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vilco
Post by Corey Richardson
My local fast-food joint is ran by Pakistani Muslims and their menu
is
Post by Corey Richardson
Halal but they'll put bacon on burgers and serve pork hot-dogs.
Maybe they watered down theyr religiousness? Here in Italy many kabab
shops refuse to sell alcoholic beverages for religious reasons, while
other care less about religion and do sell them. In some shops who
don't sell alcohol you can bring your own beer, while in others you
can not, probably to defend the "purity" of the place for muslims to
eat in it.
After learning this, I always ask for a beer and, if they say they
don't sell it, always ask if I can bring in my own beer while they're
readiyng my kabab, just to abide offending someone's religious
beliefs. And even when they tell me I can bring a beer there, I drink
it only outside and let the beer out on the sidewalk before entering
to get my kebab and pay for it, then get back out and catch up my
beer. I've seen it makes them feel better, probably the ones who let
you bring a beer in are doing it to be kind to you but at the same
time are worrying about what theyr muslim customers will think of it.
Ask for a cup and pour your beer into the cup. Also you could take your beer
or wine or whatever in, in a plain brown paper bag or a plastic shopping
bag if you do not want to offend the hypocritical 'pious' or the law. But
somehow I don't this this practise is against the law. I think the law in
the UK only covers the selling of alcoholic drinks rather that the
consumption (drinking).

The Turkish and Kurdish doner places in London do not have such qualms. The
only reason that they don't sell beer, is that they have to get a licence to
sell alcohol and that is a long and expensive process at least in the UK.

Turks actually consume a lot of alcoholic drinks. I was surprised when I
found out that Efes, the popular Pilner beer of Turkey, has an annual
capacity to produce 8 billion, yes billion with a b, litres of Efes beer.

Raki, the Turkish version of the Greek Ouzo or the French Pernod, for
example is very popular amongst Turks.
--
choro
*****
Post by Vilco
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
amandaF
2008-08-21 13:50:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 23:42:09 +0200, Waldo Centini
Post by Waldo Centini
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by Waldo Centini
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
Döner and Shwarma are lamb as well.
At least [being Islamic] they can never be pork.
They're allowed to *sell* food with pork in it though aren't they?
An Islamic trader is allowed to sell food which contains prok, but not
prepare it.
Is that prepare it, or cook it?
My local fast-food joint is ran by Pakistani Muslims and their menu is
Halal but they'll put bacon on burgers and serve pork hot-dogs.
How can they call they menu halal and sell bacon and pork? may be I
need to check into the strict meaning of halal.
choro
2008-08-21 14:26:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 23:42:09 +0200, Waldo Centini
Post by Waldo Centini
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by Waldo Centini
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
Döner and Shwarma are lamb as well.
At least [being Islamic] they can never be pork.
They're allowed to *sell* food with pork in it though aren't they?
An Islamic trader is allowed to sell food which contains prok, but not
prepare it.
Is that prepare it, or cook it?
My local fast-food joint is ran by Pakistani Muslims and their menu is
Halal but they'll put bacon on burgers and serve pork hot-dogs.
# How can they call they menu halal and sell bacon and pork? may be I
# need to check into the strict meaning of halal.

Halal means that the animal is slaughtered according to religious rules. The
blood of the animal must be drained which is only possible when the animal
is slaughtered. Thus Jewish Kosher meat is, in my humble opinion, 'halal'
whereas Halal meat is not Kosher because for the very simple reason that the
Kosher authorities have not taken their cut!!! You can argue that it is a
rule that guarantees the product but you could also argue that it is a mafia
style tax on food consumption. Well, that's how I see it.

Of course neither a HALAL place nor Indeed a Kosher restaurant can sell or
even keep pork on the premises. Not only that, but you cannot even use the
same knives to cut pork and halal or kosher meats or foods. That is a strict
rule both with Jews as well as Moslems.

Eating or drinking of blood is taboo both with Judaism and Islam. Moreover,
strict Jews will not even touch milk or dairy products if they eat meat.
That is not kosher!
--
choro
*****
na'drangheta
2008-08-20 21:45:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...

"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork, not
lamb!

In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam prohibits
the consumption of pork.

rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Post by kilikini
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 tsps. dried oregano leaves, crushed
1 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. pepper
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Wrap it up in a pita, add some tomatoes, onions or lettuce if you want.
kili
kilikini
2008-08-20 21:55:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from
pork, not lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam
prohibits the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat is
always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people are
from?

Tarpon Springs is a city in Pinellas County, Florida, United States. The
population was 21,003 at the 2000 census. According to the U.S. Census
Bureau's 2004 estimates, the city had a population of 22,554. Tarpon Springs
is notable for having the highest percentage of Greek-Americans of any city
in the U.S.

Tarpon Springs Florida, home of the historic Sponge Docks.
The Sponge Industry helped build a Greek Community that is now famous not
only for the worlds finest sponges, but for some of the finest Greek
Restaurants, Markets, and Bakeries in the Country. What you will find at the
Tarpon Springs Sponge Docks: Greek Restaurants, Bakeries, Natural Sponges,
Sponge Diving, Tours, Sightseeing Cruises, Unique Greek and Florida
Souvenirs, lots of Shopping, Jewelry, Art galleries, Aquarium, Hand Rolled
Cigars, and Live Entertainment (Bouzoukia).

kili
gogu
2008-08-20 22:01:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by kilikini
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from
pork, not lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam
prohibits the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.

rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 22:04:38 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:01:53 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from
pork, not lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam
prohibits the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
rgrds
Do you have a recipe for it that you can replicate at home, please?
gogu
2008-08-20 22:11:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:01:53 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from
pork, not lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam
prohibits the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
rgrds
Do you have a recipe for it that you can replicate at home, please?
Unfortunately I don't...
Even if I had shares for some years in a restaurant where we were serving
gyros...
The only thing I remember is that we were placing the meet in several layers
and between them the condiments and a pasta of crushed onion with some olive
oil and vinegar.
We were leaving it to "season" for about 12 hours (overnight).


rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
gogu
2008-08-20 22:23:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:01:53 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
rgrds
Do you have a recipe for it that you can replicate at home, please?
I just found a recipe for home made gyros but it's in...Greek!

------------
http://www.sintagespareas.gr/sintages/pita-giros-xoirino-apo-spiti.html


???? - ????? ??????? ??? ?????!

?????????

?????? ?? ???? ???? ??'???; ????? ??? ?????????? ???? ????? ?? ??? ????????
????? ???; ???? ?????? ??? ?? ?????.



?????????


???????? ??????? 4 ?????
a.. 400 ?? ??????? ????? ???????
b.. 2 ????????
c.. 1 ????????
d.. ???? ???????? ??????????? ????????
e.. ???????? ??????? ?? ?? ?????? ???
f.. 2 ???????? ??????
g.. 1 ???????? ????
h.. ??????, ??????, ??????, ?????, ??????
i.. 3 ??????? ???????
j.. ???? ???????
k.. ????? ??? ????????
l.. ?????????
???????

1.. ?????? ?? ??????? ?? ???? ?????? ?????????? ??? ?? ?????? ?? ???? ????
?? ?? ???? ??? 2 ????????? ????????? ??? 1 ??? ??????? ???? ?? ??? ??
?????????.
2.. ?????? ?? ??????? ?? ????? ??? ?? ???????? ?? ??????????? ??????
??????? ??? ?? ??????? ???? ????. ??????? ?? ?????? ??? ?? ??????? ???
???????? ???? ?? ?? ???????? ??? ?????????? ??? ?????? ?? ?????? ????????.
3.. ???? ??? ??? ???, ?????????? ???? ?? ??? ?????????, ?? ???????? ???
???? ??? ??? ???? ????? ??????? ?? ????? ???? ?? ?? ???????? ??? ??? ??
?????? ???? ?????? ????? ?? ??????????? ?????????? ??? ??????? 1???? ???,
????????????? ????? ?? ??? ????????. ?? ?? ??????? ???? ?? ???? ??? ?????
?????? ?????. ?? ????? ??? ??????? ?????????? ???? ????????? ?????.
4.. ????? ?? ?????, ????? ?????????? ??? ?????? ??? ??????? ??
???????????? ??? ??? ??????????.
5.. ???? ?????????? ?? ??? ??????? ???????? ??? ??? ???? ??? ?????? ???
?????? ??? ??????? ???? 1 ????? ??? ???? ?????? ???? ?? ?????????.
6.. ?????????? ???? ?????????? ?? ??? ????? ?? ????? ?? ???? ??? ?????
???? ?? ????? ??? ?????.
7.. ???????? ??? ????, ?????? ???? ??? ?????????? ??????, ?????, ???????,
???????? ??? ??????? ??? ???? ??????? ??? ???? ??? ???????????!

???? ??????? ?????

1.??? ??????? ?? ?????? ?? ????????? ?? ????????? ???????? ?? ??? ??????
??????? ?? ?? ???????:????????? ??????? ????? ??????

2.???? ??? ????? ???? ??????? ??? ?? ????????? ??? ????? ??? ???? ????????
??? 1 ??????? ??????????? ?? ??? ?????? ???????.

3.??? ????? ???? ???????, ?? ??? ?????? ?? ?????????? ????? ????????? ??? ??
??? ???????? ????????? 1/2 ????? ??????? ?????! ???? ?????!!

4.?????? ? ??? ??? ?? ?????? ??? ???? ??? ????????? ??? ?? ?????? ???. ???
???? ???????? ???? ?????? ??? ???????? ??? ?? ??????? ???? ????????.

--------------------
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 23:36:17 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:23:29 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:01:53 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
rgrds
Do you have a recipe for it that you can replicate at home, please?
I just found a recipe for home made gyros but it's in...Greek!
------------
http://www.sintagespareas.gr/sintages/pita-giros-xoirino-apo-spiti.html
???? - ????? ??????? ??? ?????!
Unfortunately, that just came out as question marks for me :(
gogu
2008-08-20 23:55:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:23:29 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
Do you have a recipe for it that you can replicate at home, please?
I just found a recipe for home made gyros but it's in...Greek!
------------
http://www.sintagespareas.gr/sintages/pita-giros-xoirino-apo-spiti.html
???? - ????? ??????? ??? ?????!
Unfortunately, that just came out as question marks for me :(
Yep...
But you can always look up at the link provided.
And of course ask a Greek friend to translate it;-)

rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
tvor
2008-08-21 13:42:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:23:29 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:01:53 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
rgrds
Do you have a recipe for it that you can replicate at home, please?
I just found a recipe for home made gyros but it's in...Greek!
------------
http://www.sintagespareas.gr/sintages/pita-giros-xoirino-apo-spiti.html
???? - ????? ??????? ??? ?????!
Unfortunately, that just came out as question marks for me :(
try this:
http://www2.worldlingo.com/en/products_services/worldlingo_translator.html

I came up with the following translation:

400 [gr] pork without [kokkala]
2 tomatoes
1 onion
half [flytzana] [psilokommeno] parsley
Yoghurt depending on [goysto] your
2 cloves garlic
1 cup [xydi]
cumin, [rigani], thyme, salt, pepper
3 big potatoes
few paprika
pies for skewer
olive oil
Directives

Cut pork in very small [mpoykitses] and you put him in [mpol] with the
[xydi] and 2 spoonfuls olive oil for 1 hour roughly with the all spices.
Cut the tomato in slices and the onion in elongated thin bands and you leave
him in the end. The garlic and rub him you throw in the yoghurt with the
parsley and [xanabazete] in the refrigerator he remains frozen.
Afterwards from one hour, you add oil in a saucepan, it covers [pato] her
and when it burns you throw his meat with [marinada] and in mediocrely to
low fire him you cook covered for roughly 1[misi] hour, mixing often it does
not stick. You will remove him when it has a beautiful [rodino] colour. If
you see and are stuck you still add little olive oil.
Until it is cooked, you you clean and you cut the potatoes in [mpastoynakia]
and [tiganizete].
when it burns you throw his meat with [marinada] and in mediocrely to low
fire him you cook covered for roughly 1[misi] hour, mixing often it does not
stick. You will remove him when it has a beautiful [rodino] colour. If you
see and are stuck you still add little olive oil.
Until it is cooked, you you clean and you cut the potatoes in [mpastoynakia]
and [tiganizete].
when you finish with the potatoes you take a pie him you put in the frying
pan and you leave only 1 thin from each side in order that [afratepsei].
Attend when you finish with the pies the meat already it has been cooked so
that they are all hot.
Take a pie, you put above as long as [giaoyrtaki] you want, meat, tomato,
onion and potatoes and few paprika from above and [aplambanete]!


Few secrets still
1.[Tis] potatoes if you want to rescue the [tiganisma] you can make him
according to the recipe: Pancakes potatoes without compunctions
2.[Tote] the pies simply spread with olive oil and you cook in the
[tostiera] for 1 [leptaki] being careful they do not become hard.
3.[Se] the meat when it is cooked, if you do not want to add [extra]
[elaioladi] in order to it does not stick you add 1/2 mug red wine! Other
Perfume!!
4.[Fysika] [sos] that you will put in your tour it depends from [goysta]
your. I simply I added little garlic in the yoghurt in order to it reminds
few [tzatziki].
choro
2008-08-21 14:37:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by tvor
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:23:29 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:01:53 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
rgrds
Do you have a recipe for it that you can replicate at home, please?
I just found a recipe for home made gyros but it's in...Greek!
------------
http://www.sintagespareas.gr/sintages/pita-giros-xoirino-apo-spiti.html
???? - ????? ??????? ??? ?????!
Unfortunately, that just came out as question marks for me :(
http://www2.worldlingo.com/en/products_services/worldlingo_translator.html
400 [gr] pork without [kokkala]
2 tomatoes
1 onion
half [flytzana] [psilokommeno] parsley
Yoghurt depending on [goysto] your
2 cloves garlic
1 cup [xydi]
cumin, [rigani], thyme, salt, pepper
3 big potatoes
few paprika
pies for skewer
olive oil
Directives
Cut pork in very small [mpoykitses] and you put him in [mpol] with the
[xydi] and 2 spoonfuls olive oil for 1 hour roughly with the all spices.
Cut the tomato in slices and the onion in elongated thin bands and you
leave him in the end. The garlic and rub him you throw in the yoghurt with
the parsley and [xanabazete] in the refrigerator he remains frozen.
Afterwards from one hour, you add oil in a saucepan, it covers [pato] her
and when it burns you throw his meat with [marinada] and in mediocrely to
low fire him you cook covered for roughly 1[misi] hour, mixing often it
does not stick. You will remove him when it has a beautiful [rodino]
colour. If you see and are stuck you still add little olive oil.
Until it is cooked, you you clean and you cut the potatoes in
[mpastoynakia] and [tiganizete].
when it burns you throw his meat with [marinada] and in mediocrely to low
fire him you cook covered for roughly 1[misi] hour, mixing often it does
not stick. You will remove him when it has a beautiful [rodino] colour. If
you see and are stuck you still add little olive oil.
Until it is cooked, you you clean and you cut the potatoes in
[mpastoynakia] and [tiganizete].
when you finish with the potatoes you take a pie him you put in the frying
pan and you leave only 1 thin from each side in order that [afratepsei].
Attend when you finish with the pies the meat already it has been cooked
so that they are all hot.
Take a pie, you put above as long as [giaoyrtaki] you want, meat, tomato,
onion and potatoes and few paprika from above and [aplambanete]!
Few secrets still
1.[Tis] potatoes if you want to rescue the [tiganisma] you can make him
according to the recipe: Pancakes potatoes without compunctions
2.[Tote] the pies simply spread with olive oil and you cook in the
[tostiera] for 1 [leptaki] being careful they do not become hard.
3.[Se] the meat when it is cooked, if you do not want to add [extra]
[elaioladi] in order to it does not stick you add 1/2 mug red wine! Other
Perfume!!
4.[Fysika] [sos] that you will put in your tour it depends from [goysta]
your. I simply I added little garlic in the yoghurt in order to it reminds
few [tzatziki].
Judging by the diminutives used and the translation or rather what couldn't
be translated I would say that this recipe was written by a "mounaki".
<Wink>

I am surprised she didn't call it "tzatzikaki", this "mounaki". Even "lepto"
(minute) has been used in the diminutive "leptaki".

I could have edited the machine translation for you but just haven't got the
time. I am behind with my work as it is!
--
choro
*******
gogu
2008-08-21 14:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by tvor
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:23:29 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
------------
http://www.sintagespareas.gr/sintages/pita-giros-xoirino-apo-spiti.html
???? - ????? ??????? ??? ?????!
Unfortunately, that just came out as question marks for me :(
http://www2.worldlingo.com/en/products_services/worldlingo_translator.html
400 [gr] pork without [kokkala]
[bones]
Post by tvor
2 tomatoes
1 onion
half [flytzana]
[cup]
Post by tvor
[psilokommeno]
[fine-cut]
Post by tvor
parsley
Yoghurt depending on [goysto] your
[your taste]
Post by tvor
2 cloves garlic
1 cup [xydi]
[vinegar]
Post by tvor
cumin, [rigani],
[origan]
Post by tvor
thyme, salt, pepper
3 big potatoes
few paprika
pies for skewer
olive oil
Directives
Cut pork in very small [mpoykitses]
[pieces]
Post by tvor
and you put him in [mpol]
[bowl]
Post by tvor
with the [xydi]
[vinegar]
Post by tvor
and 2 spoonfuls olive oil for 1 hour roughly with the all spices.
Cut the tomato in slices and the onion in elongated thin bands and you
leave him in the end. The garlic and rub him you throw in the yoghurt with
the parsley and [xanabazete]
[put back]
Post by tvor
in the refrigerator he remains frozen.
Afterwards from one hour, you add oil in a saucepan, it covers [pato]
[bottom]
Post by tvor
her and when it burns you throw his meat with [marinada]
[marinate=the whole mixture including the liquid]
Post by tvor
and in mediocrely to low fire him you cook covered for roughly 1[misi]
[half]
Post by tvor
hour, mixing often it does not stick. You will remove him when it has a
beautiful [rodino]
[red-looking]
Post by tvor
colour. If you see and are stuck you still add little olive oil.
Until it is cooked, you you clean and you cut the potatoes in
[mpastoynakia]
[sticks]
Post by tvor
and [tiganizete].
[fry]
Post by tvor
when it burns you throw his meat with [marinada]
[marinate=the whole mixture including the liquid]
Post by tvor
and in mediocrely to low fire him you cook covered for roughly 1[misi]
[half]
Post by tvor
hour, mixing often it does not stick. You will remove him when it has a
beautiful [rodino]
[red-looking]
Post by tvor
colour. If you see and are stuck you still add little olive oil.
Until it is cooked, you you clean and you cut the potatoes in
[mpastoynakia]
[sticks]
Post by tvor
and [tiganizete].
[fry]
Post by tvor
when you finish with the potatoes you take a pie him you put in the frying
pan and you leave only 1 thin from each side in order that [afratepsei].
[to be(come) soft]
Post by tvor
Attend when you finish with the pies the meat already it has been cooked
so that they are all hot.
Take a pie, you put above as long as [giaoyrtaki]
[yogurt]
Post by tvor
you want, meat, tomato, onion and potatoes and few paprika from above and
[aplambanete]!
[enjoy]
Post by tvor
Few secrets still
1.[Tis]
[The]
Post by tvor
potatoes if you want to rescue the [tiganisma]
[fry part]
Post by tvor
you can make him according to the recipe: Pancakes potatoes without
compunctions
2.[Tote]
[Then]
Post by tvor
the pies simply spread with olive oil and you cook in the [tostiera]
[toaster]
Post by tvor
for 1 [leptaki]
[minute]
Post by tvor
being careful they do not become hard.
3.[Se] the meat when it is cooked, if you do not want to add [extra]
[elaioladi]
[olive oil]
Post by tvor
in order to it does not stick you add 1/2 mug red wine! Other Perfume!!
4.[Fysika]
[Naturaly]
Post by tvor
[sos] that you will put in your tour it depends from [goysta]
[the taste]
Post by tvor
your. I simply I added little garlic in the yoghurt in order to it reminds
few [tzatziki].
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
gogu
2008-08-20 22:26:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:01:53 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
rgrds
Do you have a recipe for it that you can replicate at home, please?
And this is a recipe for the condiments for gyros.
Again in Greek, I am sorry...
-------------
http://www.radicio.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=3800

????? ?????????? ??? ????


?????

3 ????????? ?????? ?????
1 ???????? ?????? ??????? ??????
1 ????????? ??????? ??????? ???????
1 ????????? ??????? ????? ??????
1 ????????? ??????? ????? ??????
1 ???????? ?????? ??????????? ????????
1 ???????? ?????? ?????? ?? ?????
1 ???????? ?????? ??????

????????

??????????? ??? ?? ????? ??? ?? ?????? ?? ?????? ???? ?????????. ???? ??
????? ?? ??????? 1 - 2 ????? ?? ?????????? ???? ?? ???????.
??????? ???? ???? ?????? ?? ?????, ?? ??????????? ?????????? ?? ?? ?????????
??? ?? ??????? ????????? ??? ?????? ?? ????????.
?? ?????? ???????? ?? ?????????? ????????? ??? ????????? ??? ?.?. ??????,
???????? ?????? ?.?. ? ?? ?????????? ?????? ??? ??? ????????.
-------------------
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
choro
2008-08-21 02:25:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from
pork, not lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam
prohibits the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
Because pork is cheaper than lamb.

Careful they don't turn you into "gyros" you porkie town boi!

Don't I just LUVVVV this gogu townboi!!!
--
choro
*****
Post by gogu
rgrds
gogu
2008-08-21 07:54:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from
pork, not lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam
prohibits the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
I live in Greece and *all over Greece* gyros is made from pork.
Because pork is cheaper than lamb.
As I have anticipated, here "it" is the usual filthy, barbarian Turkish
TROLL trying to flame every posting in scg!
Please ignore "it"!

GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Post by choro
Careful they don't turn you into "gyros" you porkie town boi!
Don't I just LUVVVV this gogu townboi!!!
--
choro
*****
Vilco
2008-08-21 13:25:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by gogu
Post by choro
Because pork is cheaper than lamb.
GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Make kebab not war
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 13:36:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vilco
Post by gogu
Post by choro
Because pork is cheaper than lamb.
GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Make kebab not war
Do NOT tell folks ngs that you don't know how they should deal with their
trolls. You might consider removing scg for your future conversation with
this Turkish swine here, posting as "choro".
choro
2008-08-21 14:40:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Panta Rhei
Post by Vilco
Post by gogu
Post by choro
Because pork is cheaper than lamb.
GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Make kebab not war
Do NOT tell folks ngs that you don't know how they should deal with their
trolls. You might consider removing scg for your future conversation with
this Turkish swine here, posting as "choro".
Hi Panta. How are you today, old girl?

No hard feelings. Come to think of it, you are so old and decrepit that you
can't even give a man a hard-on.
--
choro
*****
gogu
2008-08-21 14:54:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vilco
Post by gogu
Post by choro
Because pork is cheaper than lamb.
GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Make kebab not war
Indeed...
BTW, "pita" is (a)/the Greek name, not the Turkish one!

rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Post by Vilco
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
gogu
2008-08-20 22:33:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by kilikini
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from
pork, not lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam
prohibits the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
More about gyros and from what it's made ("...In Greece and Cyprus, the meat
is typically pork, chicken, and occasionally beef...") you can find here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
As you can see, in various countries gyros is made in many various ways,
based -I suppose- on local preferences.
But the original Greek gyros is made of pork.

rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 23:40:12 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:33:01 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from
pork, not lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam
prohibits the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
More about gyros and from what it's made ("...In Greece and Cyprus, the meat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
As you can see, in various countries gyros is made in many various ways,
based -I suppose- on local preferences.
But the original Greek gyros is made of pork.
rgrds
In the UK, 90%? of Gyros are made by Pakistani Muslims (why I don't
know) but maybe that explains the predominate of lamb?
gogu
2008-08-20 23:59:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:33:01 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
More about gyros and from what it's made ("...In Greece and Cyprus, the meat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
As you can see, in various countries gyros is made in many various ways,
based -I suppose- on local preferences.
But the original Greek gyros is made of pork.
rgrds
In the UK, 90%? of Gyros are made by Pakistani Muslims (why I don't
know) but maybe that explains the predominate of lamb?
Quite possible!
In any case and having tasted pork and lamb gyros (and also chicken), I
personally prefer the pork gyros.
Of course it's all a matter of personal taste.

rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
choro
2008-08-21 02:28:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:33:01 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
More about gyros and from what it's made ("...In Greece and Cyprus, the meat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
As you can see, in various countries gyros is made in many various ways,
based -I suppose- on local preferences.
But the original Greek gyros is made of pork.
rgrds
In the UK, 90%? of Gyros are made by Pakistani Muslims (why I don't
know) but maybe that explains the predominate of lamb?
Quite possible!
In any case and having tasted pork and lamb gyros (and also chicken), I
personally prefer the pork gyros.
Each to his own kind, as they say, townboi!
--
choro
*****
Post by gogu
Of course it's all a matter of personal taste.
rgrds
gogu
2008-08-21 07:55:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:33:01 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by kilikini
Huh, I live within a few hours from a HUGE Greek community and Gyro meat
is always lamb around here. Maybe it depends on where in Greece people
are from?
More about gyros and from what it's made ("...In Greece and Cyprus, the meat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
As you can see, in various countries gyros is made in many various ways,
based -I suppose- on local preferences.
But the original Greek gyros is made of pork.
rgrds
In the UK, 90%? of Gyros are made by Pakistani Muslims (why I don't
know) but maybe that explains the predominate of lamb?
Quite possible!
In any case and having tasted pork and lamb gyros (and also chicken), I
personally prefer the pork gyros.
Each to his own kind, as they say, townboi!
As I had anticipated, here "it" is the usual filthy, barbarian Turkish TROLL
trying to flame every posting in scg!
Please ignore "it"!

GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Post by choro
--
choro
*****
Vilco
2008-08-21 13:30:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by gogu
As you can see, in various countries gyros is made in many various
ways, based -I suppose- on local preferences.
But the original Greek gyros is made of pork.
In the UK, 90%? of Gyros are made by Pakistani Muslims (why I don't
know) but maybe that explains the predominate of lamb?
Here in northern Italy they're run half by pakistani and half by other
muslims moroccans, tunisians, egiptians and so on. They're almost all
using beef or veal because of the typical northern italian disliking
for lamb meat, sigh... Only in bigger cities with a vast arab
population you can find *real* kebab made with lamb or sheep. In
Bologna there's a turkish fusion stand making a wonderful falafel
dressed with tunisian harissa, and offersa kebab with lamb or with
goat, at the customers' choice. I love it!!!
BTW - if one happened to get in northern Italy, this wonderful falafel
& kebab stand is in Via Centotrecento, in the center of Bologna.
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 21:56:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork, not
lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam prohibits
the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Aren't "Gyros" AKA "Döner kebabs" a Greek invention anyway?
gogu
2008-08-20 22:03:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork, not
lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam prohibits
the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Aren't "Gyros" AKA "Döner kebabs" a Greek invention anyway?
Oh please, don't start another Greco-Turkish war in scg;-)

rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 22:06:51 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:03:21 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork, not
lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam prohibits
the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Aren't "Gyros" AKA "Döner kebabs" a Greek invention anyway?
Oh please, don't start another Greco-Turkish war in scg;-)
rgrds
Sorry. It was just a question and I don't want to start any wars!
gogu
2008-08-20 22:15:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 01:03:21 +0300, "gogu"
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
Aren't "Gyros" AKA "Döner kebabs" a Greek invention anyway?
Oh please, don't start another Greco-Turkish war in scg;-)
rgrds
Sorry. It was just a question and I don't want to start any wars!
And I have used a smiley if you haven't noticed it;-)
Turks claim it's Turkish, we Greeks claim it's Greek, now go and find what
it is;-)
Anyway, it was a big surprise to me to see a gyros made of lamb the first
time I visited Constantinople but I suppose every people is cooking the same
food the way they like it...

rgrds
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
choro
2008-08-21 02:39:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork, not
lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam prohibits
the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Aren't "Gyros" AKA "Döner kebabs" a Greek invention anyway?
Oh please, don't start another Greco-Turkish war in scg;-)
Don't worry townboi, I have already started it. Gyros Greek... My
foot... Whatever next? Its like saying Chow Mein is German. After all,
Hitler wrote Mein Kamppf, didn't he? But in the case of 'gyros' it is
just a direct translation from the Turkish "döner".

But of course, Gagamemnon-ass will now jump in and claim that "ntounia"
is Greek!!! Or that Gül Bahçe (Rose Garden in Turkish) -- the Title of a
famous Greek rembetika song in which the women is in love with a Turkish
man -- is also pure Greek from 10,000 BC when Greeks hadn't even
migrated to what is now Greece!!!

Don't I just love those rembetika songs? But to claim that some of the
Turkish words they use in those songs are Greek rather than Turkish is
pure nonsense. How far do you take bigotism? Where some Greeks are
concerned you take it all the way and claim that words which contain
sounds not even reflected in the Greek alphabet are of Greek origin!!!

Kalimera "Kyria" gogu!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sorry I forgot you are a boi, you townboi and addressed you as "Kyria"...
--
choro
*****
Post by gogu
rgrds
gogu
2008-08-21 07:58:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by gogu
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork, not
lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam prohibits
the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Aren't "Gyros" AKA "Döner kebabs" a Greek invention anyway?
Oh please, don't start another Greco-Turkish war in scg;-)
Don't worry townboi, I have already started it. Gyros Greek... My foot...
Whatever next? Its like saying Chow Mein is German. After all, Hitler
wrote Mein Kamppf, didn't he? But in the case of 'gyros' it is just a
direct translation from the Turkish "döner".
But of course, Gagamemnon-ass will now jump in and claim that "ntounia" is
Greek!!! Or that Gül Bahçe (Rose Garden in Turkish) -- the Title of a
famous Greek rembetika song in which the women is in love with a Turkish
man -- is also pure Greek from 10,000 BC when Greeks hadn't even migrated
to what is now Greece!!!
Don't I just love those rembetika songs? But to claim that some of the
Turkish words they use in those songs are Greek rather than Turkish is
pure nonsense. How far do you take bigotism? Where some Greeks are
concerned you take it all the way and claim that words which contain
sounds not even reflected in the Greek alphabet are of Greek origin!!!
Kalimera "Kyria" gogu!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Sorry I forgot you are a boi, you townboi and addressed you as "Kyria"...
Ladies and gentlemen, here you can see an extremist Turk in action;-)
Enjoy;-)

As I had anticipated, here "it" is the usual filthy, barbarian Turkish TROLL
trying to flame every posting in scg!
Please ignore "it"!

GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
--
choro
*****
choro
2008-08-21 04:03:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork, not
lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam prohibits
the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Aren't "Gyros" AKA "Döner kebabs" a Greek invention anyway?
But of course!

Greeks also invented the four elements of earth, wind, water and fire.
Nothing existed before the Greeks. Not the ancient Egyptian civilization,
nor the Phoenicians, nor the Sumerians! Not the Indian and Chinese
civilizations either. The Greeks were also to invent the alphabet which the
earlier Phoenicians pinched from them. Sort of time regression, you know!!!

Greeks also invented the arch though their arches were copied from the
non-arches of the earlier Egyptians and Sumerians. Why non-arches, did I
hear you say? Because Greeks discovered that putting a beam on top of two
pillars formed the perfect arch which was later to be bastardised into what
is now mistakenly called an arch. A proper Greek arch does not have any
bendy lines.

In the beginning there was nothing but "gyros"!
--
choro
*****
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 11:25:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's known as Dφner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork, not
lamb!
In Turkey and other Muslim countries it's made from lamb as Islam prohibits
the consumption of pork.
rgrds
Aren't "Gyros" AKA "Dφner kebabs" a Greek invention anyway?
But of course!
<snip the usual sick blather>

Still spreading your stench in European newsgroups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
Giusi
2008-08-21 09:54:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork,
not lamb!
I have has it in Greece innumerable times and it was always lamb or at least
in large part lamb. I don't think I have ever had it made of pork, although
I suppose that would be cheaper in some countries.

Are you really a Calabrian gangster? If so, why would you advertise it?
gogu
2008-08-21 11:57:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Giusi
Post by na'drangheta
Post by kilikini
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
I doubt it...
"Gyros" is the Greek name for "doner" and in Greece it's made from pork,
not lamb!
I have has it in Greece innumerable times and it was always lamb or at
least in large part lamb. I don't think I have ever had it made of pork,
although I suppose that would be cheaper in some countries.
I think that you were eating pork and thought you are eating lamb.
Next time in Greece ask what is made of the gyros you are eating.
Here in Greece you will find gyros of mainly two kind of meat: mainly of
pork and largely of chicken.
Usually most of the restaurants selling gyros have both: pork and chicken.
Never except in rare cases you'll find lamb gyros in Greece.
As you seem to have it all wrong, I suppose you are not saying that even
Wikipedia is lying:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
Post by Giusi
Are you really a Calabrian gangster? If so, why would you advertise it?
???
I think you are another candidate for the KF...
Va'te la piglia nel ****, va.
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Giusi
2008-08-21 12:05:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by gogu
As you seem to have it all wrong, I suppose you are not saying that even
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
I have not been in Greece for some years, but Wikipedia is also very often
wrong.
Post by gogu
Post by Giusi
Are you really a Calabrian gangster? If so, why would you advertise it?
???
I think you are another candidate for the KF...
Va'te la piglia nel ****, va.
You do exactly as you please, but
na'drangheta is what Calabrian organized crime calls itself, or if it is
not, it is close enough to fool someone who doesn't speak dialect. I
wouldn't call myself a mafiosa or camorrista.
gogu
2008-08-21 12:17:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Giusi
Post by gogu
As you seem to have it all wrong, I suppose you are not saying that even
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros
I have not been in Greece for some years, but Wikipedia is also very often
wrong.
I think that you were eating pork and thought you are eating lamb.
Next time in Greece ask what is made of the gyros you are eating.
Here in Greece you will find gyros of mainly two kind of meat: mainly of
pork and largely of chicken.
Usually most of the restaurants selling gyros have both: pork and chicken.
Never except in rare cases you'll find lamb gyros in Greece.
As you seem to have it all wrong, I suppose you are not saying that even
Wikipedia is lying:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyros

** I eat it since 46 years and *all around Greece* is always made of mainly
pork, many times of chicken but never (or almost never) lamb!
As I said, next time in Greece ask what it's made of and you may have a
surprise...
Post by Giusi
Post by gogu
Post by Giusi
Are you really a Calabrian gangster? If so, why would you advertise it?
???
I think you are another candidate for the KF...
Va'te la piglia nel ****, va.
You do exactly as you please, but
na'drangheta is what Calabrian organized crime calls itself, or if it is
not, it is close enough to fool someone who doesn't speak dialect. I
wouldn't call myself a mafiosa or camorrista.
Then you are "constipated"!
So I suppose that thousands of guys using nicks like "hell's angels" or
"ugly Tom" or "fanatic" or "silent death" or "sexy Ann" or...or...or
similar, they should be...ashamed, too!
Oh, well, you meet every kind of fruits on Usenet these days...

PS
I suppose "babeone" is a decent nick;-)
--
E' mai possibile, oh porco di un cane, che le avventure
in codesto reame debban risolversi tutte con grandi
puttane! F.d.A

Coins, travels and more:
http://s208.photobucket.com/albums/bb120/golanule/
http://gogu.enosi.org/index.html
Vilco
2008-08-21 13:36:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by gogu
Post by Giusi
Are you really a Calabrian gangster? If so, why would you
advertise
Post by gogu
Post by Giusi
it?
???
I think you are another candidate for the KF...
Va'te la piglia nel ****, va.
Adesso tutto si spiega, sei solo una povera testa di cazzo. Se sei
davvero un calabrese vatti a schiantare sulla Salerno - Reggio
Calabria, coglione, cosi la smetti di disonorare la Calabria.
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 22:08:22 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:08:20 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Sounds good, but I'd add mint to that too. Or eat it with chili sauce.
choro
2008-08-21 02:57:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 17:08:20 -0400, "kilikini"
Post by kilikini
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Sounds good, but I'd add mint to that too. Or eat it with chili sauce.
NO SUGAR!!! Sugar is for poofters!!!

And use normal 'set' yogurt made from full fat milk, not made from
either skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. I said 'set' yogurt because some
so-called yogurts are runny like the stuff that runs of gogu's nose when
he has got the flu!

And buy young cucumber with the skin not smoothed out yet and the seeds
just forming. It doesn't need to be 'seeded'. And make sure you dice or
slice it in tiny bits -- never put it through those horrible electric
kitchen tools. Your cucumber's crunchiness will become history and it
will taste awful.

And to finish it off, pour a dollop of olive oil on top and sprinkle it
with dried mint rubbed in the hand. Put in in your left palm and rub it
with the base of the right hand thumb.

And finally decorate it with one or just a few black olives!

Bon appetit!
--
choro
*****
Sarah
2008-08-21 08:00:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 tsps. dried oregano leaves, crushed
1 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. pepper
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Wrap it up in a pita, add some tomatoes, onions or lettuce if you want.
kili
Sounds very nice. My DH loves donner kebabs that we get as take out here in
the UK. After many attempts to recreate them at home we discovered a place
that sells buckets of frozen kebab meat to caterers! It's definitely the
real deal, and anyone wanting a gourmet feast would probably pass out with
shock, as it contains all sorts of crap (Beef fat being high on the list of
ingredients) Donner kebab in the UK is definitely not posh food. But DH
loves them, so off I trot every couple of months to buy a bucket of cooked
and sliced 'meat' that can be nuked whenever the need for a kebab gets too
strong. I guess there's about a kilo of meat per bucket so it lasts a while
in the freezer.
Served with pita bread, shredded white cabbage, grated carrot, onion and
lots of chilli sauce.
It's a heart attack on a plate but rationed so that I don't kill him
straight off!!!

Sarah
choro
2008-08-21 12:14:20 UTC
Permalink
You should buy true doner kebab as it is supposed to be, in layers of meat
rather than in the imitation English sausage meat. This abomination is
unfortunately the common doner as it is much cheaper. I talked to a few
doner places and they say that most people would just not pay the extra £ or
2 to get the real thing. There are some doner houses in London that serve
the proper doner or shawarma as it is sometimes called.

Both terms are corruption of the original Turkish words döner and çevirme,
btw. Though chicken döner is always made of slices of chicken flesh.

Ah, chicken flesh. I love chicken flesh, but the flesh of the featherless
type of chicken!

Sorry but you cannot recreate the same taste at home. It is just too
impractical unless you are feeding an army. Same goes for shish kebab part
of the attraction of which is the way the meat is actually smoked while
cooking from the lovely smell of the burnt fat oozing onto the charcoals
which is what makes shish kebab so aromatic in proper shish kebab places.
--
choro
*****
Post by Sarah
Post by kilikini
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
It's marinated lamb if it's Gyro meat.
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 1/2 tsps. dried oregano leaves, crushed
1 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. pepper
1 8-oz. carton plain low-fat yogurt
1/3 cup seeded, chopped cucumber
2 Tbsps. finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tsp. granulated sugar
Wrap it up in a pita, add some tomatoes, onions or lettuce if you want.
kili
Sounds very nice. My DH loves donner kebabs that we get as take out here
in the UK. After many attempts to recreate them at home we discovered a
place that sells buckets of frozen kebab meat to caterers! It's definitely
the real deal, and anyone wanting a gourmet feast would probably pass out
with shock, as it contains all sorts of crap (Beef fat being high on the
list of ingredients) Donner kebab in the UK is definitely not posh food.
But DH loves them, so off I trot every couple of months to buy a bucket of
cooked and sliced 'meat' that can be nuked whenever the need for a kebab
gets too strong. I guess there's about a kilo of meat per bucket so it
lasts a while in the freezer.
Served with pita bread, shredded white cabbage, grated carrot, onion and
lots of chilli sauce.
It's a heart attack on a plate but rationed so that I don't kill him
straight off!!!
Sarah
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 12:33:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
You should buy true doner kebab as it is supposed to be, in layers of meat
<snip the usual endless blather>

Still spreading your stench in these groups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
Sarah
2008-08-21 12:33:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
You should buy true doner kebab as it is supposed to be, in layers of meat
rather than in the imitation English sausage meat. This abomination is
unfortunately the common doner as it is much cheaper. I talked to a few
doner places and they say that most people would just not pay the extra £
or 2 to get the real thing. There are some doner houses in London that
serve the proper doner or shawarma as it is sometimes called.
Both terms are corruption of the original Turkish words döner and çevirme,
btw. Though chicken döner is always made of slices of chicken flesh.
Ah, chicken flesh. I love chicken flesh, but the flesh of the featherless
type of chicken!
Sorry but you cannot recreate the same taste at home. It is just too
impractical unless you are feeding an army. Same goes for shish kebab part
of the attraction of which is the way the meat is actually smoked while
cooking from the lovely smell of the burnt fat oozing onto the charcoals
which is what makes shish kebab so aromatic in proper shish kebab places.
--
choro
Yes your right, chicken kebab, when whole boned and skinned chickens are
piled on top of each other on a skewer and grilled! Absolutely delicious.
The takeaways here in Yorkshire tend to just grill small chunks of breast
meat and serve with salad in a pita or flat bread. The ones that would serve
a legion probably spoil too soon. That's why the 'sausage' version is
popular, there's that many spices and things added that you can't taste if
it's gone off! I did here that certain places wipe the maggots off daily
before reheating what's left on the 'sausage'!

Sarah
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 12:40:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sarah
Post by choro
You should buy true doner kebab as it is supposed to be, in layers of meat
rather than in the imitation English sausage meat. This abomination is
unfortunately the common doner as it is much cheaper. I talked to a few
doner places and they say that most people would just not pay the extra £
or 2 to get the real thing. There are some doner houses in London that
serve the proper doner or shawarma as it is sometimes called.
Both terms are corruption of the original Turkish words döner and çevirme,
btw. Though chicken döner is always made of slices of chicken flesh.
Ah, chicken flesh. I love chicken flesh, but the flesh of the featherless
type of chicken!
Sorry but you cannot recreate the same taste at home. It is just too
impractical unless you are feeding an army. Same goes for shish kebab part
of the attraction of which is the way the meat is actually smoked while
cooking from the lovely smell of the burnt fat oozing onto the charcoals
which is what makes shish kebab so aromatic in proper shish kebab places.
--
choro
Yes your right, chicken kebab, when whole boned and skinned chickens are
piled on top of each other on a skewer and grilled! Absolutely delicious.
The takeaways here in Yorkshire tend to just grill small chunks of breast
meat and serve with salad in a pita or flat bread. The ones that would serve
a legion probably spoil too soon. That's why the 'sausage' version is
popular, there's that many spices and things added that you can't taste if
it's gone off! I did here that certain places wipe the maggots off daily
before reheating what's left on the 'sausage'!
Sarah
Please leave soc.culture.greek out in the future when you are actually
"talking" to this Turkish piece of shit!

His sort of "conversation" belongs to soc.culture.turkish! You might
consider setting a f'up to sct and carry on your "conversation" with this
swine over there.

SCT added and f'up set.
choro
2008-08-21 12:58:48 UTC
Permalink
I said, have you tried your daily solo session with your infamous "massive
dildo" yet, old girl?

And stop directing all the responses to sct. That trick won't work with me
any more. I have wisened to it.

Hey old girl, I have a large sausage meat for you. Wanna try it?

Too bad. You cun't have it, you cunt.
--
choro
*****
Post by Panta Rhei
Post by Sarah
Post by choro
You should buy true doner kebab as it is supposed to be, in layers of meat
rather than in the imitation English sausage meat. This abomination is
unfortunately the common doner as it is much cheaper. I talked to a few
doner places and they say that most people would just not pay the extra £
or 2 to get the real thing. There are some doner houses in London that
serve the proper doner or shawarma as it is sometimes called.
Both terms are corruption of the original Turkish words döner and çevirme,
btw. Though chicken döner is always made of slices of chicken flesh.
Ah, chicken flesh. I love chicken flesh, but the flesh of the featherless
type of chicken!
Sorry but you cannot recreate the same taste at home. It is just too
impractical unless you are feeding an army. Same goes for shish kebab part
of the attraction of which is the way the meat is actually smoked while
cooking from the lovely smell of the burnt fat oozing onto the charcoals
which is what makes shish kebab so aromatic in proper shish kebab places.
--
choro
Yes your right, chicken kebab, when whole boned and skinned chickens are
piled on top of each other on a skewer and grilled! Absolutely delicious.
The takeaways here in Yorkshire tend to just grill small chunks of breast
meat and serve with salad in a pita or flat bread. The ones that would serve
a legion probably spoil too soon. That's why the 'sausage' version is
popular, there's that many spices and things added that you can't taste if
it's gone off! I did here that certain places wipe the maggots off daily
before reheating what's left on the 'sausage'!
Sarah
Please leave soc.culture.greek out in the future when you are actually
"talking" to this Turkish piece of shit!
His sort of "conversation" belongs to soc.culture.turkish! You might
consider setting a f'up to sct and carry on your "conversation" with this
swine over there.
SCT added and f'up set.
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 13:11:49 UTC
Permalink
chorosick, the slimy Turkish troll, writes:

<snip the usual sick blather>

Still spreading your stench in these groups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
choro
2008-08-21 12:55:24 UTC
Permalink
Take my advice and always buy doner from busy doner places. And when you go
to a doner place have a look at the doner. If it looks small, chances are it
was what was left over from the night before. Avoid it. Though most busy
places in London have proper refrigeration and do a good job. But buying
doner from a corner shop or from a van is asking for trouble.

But go for it if you see a full-size doner rotating on the spit as it will
be fresh and tasty. Next best thing is to buy doner a bit AFTER the busy
hour has started.
--
choro
*****
Post by Sarah
Post by choro
You should buy true doner kebab as it is supposed to be, in layers of
meat rather than in the imitation English sausage meat. This abomination
is unfortunately the common doner as it is much cheaper. I talked to a
few doner places and they say that most people would just not pay the
extra £ or 2 to get the real thing. There are some doner houses in London
that serve the proper doner or shawarma as it is sometimes called.
Both terms are corruption of the original Turkish words döner and
çevirme, btw. Though chicken döner is always made of slices of chicken
flesh.
Ah, chicken flesh. I love chicken flesh, but the flesh of the featherless
type of chicken!
Sorry but you cannot recreate the same taste at home. It is just too
impractical unless you are feeding an army. Same goes for shish kebab
part of the attraction of which is the way the meat is actually smoked
while cooking from the lovely smell of the burnt fat oozing onto the
charcoals which is what makes shish kebab so aromatic in proper shish
kebab places.
--
choro
Yes your right, chicken kebab, when whole boned and skinned chickens are
piled on top of each other on a skewer and grilled! Absolutely delicious.
The takeaways here in Yorkshire tend to just grill small chunks of breast
meat and serve with salad in a pita or flat bread. The ones that would
serve a legion probably spoil too soon. That's why the 'sausage' version
is popular, there's that many spices and things added that you can't taste
if it's gone off! I did here that certain places wipe the maggots off
daily before reheating what's left on the 'sausage'!
Sarah
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 13:14:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Take my advice
Still spreading your stench in European newsgroups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
BOB
2008-08-20 21:42:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
Steve (squertz) has a great recipe. Too bad you've pissed him off.

BOB
Graham
2008-08-20 21:53:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by BOB
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
Steve (squertz) has a great recipe. Too bad you've pissed him off.
BOB
It's a habit of hers/his!
MG
2008-08-21 00:19:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by BOB
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
Thank you.
Steve (squertz) has a great recipe. Too bad you've pissed him off.
BOB
and just to add a bit more diversity to the mix, in Sth Australia it's known
as yiros

usually made with lamb (slices, not minced), occasionally with chicken
(slices) or beef (minced)

never seen pork offered
Sqwertz
2008-08-21 02:02:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by BOB
Steve (squertz) has a great recipe. Too bad you've pissed him off.
Yep. Thanks for throwing him a bone, and then yanking it away!

-sw
BOB
2008-08-21 02:16:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sqwertz
Post by BOB
Steve (squertz) has a great recipe. Too bad you've pissed him off.
Yep. Thanks for throwing him a bone, and then yanking it away!
-sw
'-)

BOB
Victor Sack
2008-08-20 21:55:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.

Gyros/döner kebap may be loosely based on some ancient homemade dishes,
but the present incarnation is modern and is a restaurant/commercial
eatery dish and requires special equipment, particularly a vertical
spit, rotating in front of an electric or gas source of radiant heat. It
also requires a special machine to form a tight meat cone, as doing this
properly by hand would usually be too hard even for an experienced
professional cook. Most gyros/döner stands get their meat cones frozen
from some central source; they don't make them themselves. In most
cases, it is a true fast-food operation, in the worst sense of the word.

That said, even the best commercial made-in-situ versions leave rather a
lot to be desired, the dish being among the most overrated of any of
'em, as far as I'm concerned. Why imitate mediocrity?

Anyway, here is what I posted before, regarding actually making real
gyros/döner. Make your own conclusions.

Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least? Correctly made gyros or döner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one. Here's how it is made: Most of the meat is sliced, the rest is
minced. Then, the meat is marinated overnight in a mixture of onion
juice, oil, salt and pepper. Then, the slices are arranged on the spit,
with the tight spaces between them filled with minced meat. The whole
thing is tightly formed and slowly cooked on the rotating spit, with the
meat getting "baked" together into a tight whole. Gradually, as the
outside gets cooked, one shaves off some meat with a sharp knife from
top to bottom, exposing, little by little, the raw interior to the heat,
and continuing in this way until all the meat is cooked and shaved off.
The cooked meat is, of course, supposed to be served throughout the
rather long process, with the juice/sauce that collects underneath.

Victor
Here in Germany, döner kebap is much more popular than anywhere else in
the world. There are some 1,300 döner stands in Berlin alone, way more
than in Istanbul, let alone Athens. But then, of course, gyros/döner is
not all that traditional in its supposed ancestral lands...
Mark Thorson
2008-08-20 23:32:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Victor Sack
Here's how it is made: Most of the meat is sliced, the rest is
minced. Then, the meat is marinated overnight in a mixture of onion
juice, oil, salt and pepper. Then, the slices are arranged on the spit,
with the tight spaces between them filled with minced meat. The whole
thing is tightly formed and slowly cooked on the rotating spit, with the
meat getting "baked" together into a tight whole. Gradually, as the
outside gets cooked, one shaves off some meat with a sharp knife from
top to bottom, exposing, little by little, the raw interior to the heat,
and continuing in this way until all the meat is cooked and shaved off.
I used to frequent a place that sold these, and I don't
recall any evidence that there was any sliced meat in it.
It seemed as though the whole thing was made of ground
meat.

Although you mention using a vertical spit roaster,
It's a bit more specialized than that. I don't think
most vertical spit roasters have a pan at the bottom
of the spit, but it's necessary to have a pan at least
the diameter of the meat to support the meat during
roasting. Of course, the pan rotates with the spit.
choro
2008-08-21 03:12:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Thorson
Post by Victor Sack
Here's how it is made: Most of the meat is sliced, the rest is
minced. Then, the meat is marinated overnight in a mixture of onion
juice, oil, salt and pepper. Then, the slices are arranged on the spit,
with the tight spaces between them filled with minced meat. The whole
thing is tightly formed and slowly cooked on the rotating spit, with the
meat getting "baked" together into a tight whole. Gradually, as the
outside gets cooked, one shaves off some meat with a sharp knife from
top to bottom, exposing, little by little, the raw interior to the heat,
and continuing in this way until all the meat is cooked and shaved off.
I used to frequent a place that sold these, and I don't
recall any evidence that there was any sliced meat in it.
It seemed as though the whole thing was made of ground
meat.
Although you mention using a vertical spit roaster,
It's a bit more specialized than that. I don't think
most vertical spit roasters have a pan at the bottom
of the spit, but it's necessary to have a pan at least
the diameter of the meat to support the meat during
roasting. Of course, the pan rotates with the spit.
Sorry but you don't seem to know what you are talking about. If you
haven't seen actual meat (as opposed to mince) doner you don't know the
true doner.

Also the 'cone' is never supported by a pan. The pan is some way below
the 'cone of mince' to catch the slices when the cooked meat is sliced
off. It is also shaped in such a way that it also allows the oozing fat
to drain off. The actual cone of meat is held both at the top and the
bottom by sharp stainless steel spikes that are attached to the main rod
of the spit.
--
choro
*****
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 11:25:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by Mark Thorson
Post by Victor Sack
Here's how it is made: Most of the meat is sliced, the rest is
minced. Then, the meat is marinated overnight in a mixture of onion
juice, oil, salt and pepper. Then, the slices are arranged on the spit,
with the tight spaces between them filled with minced meat. The whole
thing is tightly formed and slowly cooked on the rotating spit, with the
meat getting "baked" together into a tight whole. Gradually, as the
outside gets cooked, one shaves off some meat with a sharp knife from
top to bottom, exposing, little by little, the raw interior to the heat,
and continuing in this way until all the meat is cooked and shaved off.
I used to frequent a place that sold these, and I don't
recall any evidence that there was any sliced meat in it.
It seemed as though the whole thing was made of ground
meat.
Although you mention using a vertical spit roaster,
It's a bit more specialized than that. I don't think
most vertical spit roasters have a pan at the bottom
of the spit, but it's necessary to have a pan at least
the diameter of the meat to support the meat during
roasting. Of course, the pan rotates with the spit.
Sorry but you don't seem to know what you are talking about. If you
haven't seen actual meat (as opposed to mince) doner you don't know the
Still spreading your stench in these groups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 23:33:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Victor Sack
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
[snip]

An excellent post that has given me a few things to think about. Thank
you Victor!
choro
2008-08-21 03:13:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by Victor Sack
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
[snip]
An excellent post that has given me a few things to think about. Thank
you Victor!
Victor doesn't know what he is talking about. See my response to him!
--
choro
*****
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 11:25:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by Corey Richardson
Post by Victor Sack
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
[snip]
An excellent post that has given me a few things to think about. Thank
you Victor!
Victor doesn't know what he is talking about. See my response to him!
Still spreading your stench in these groups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
Dave Smith
2008-08-21 01:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Victor Sack
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
I suppose there are those who consider that the real thing is the
commercially processed stuff that restaurants get from their suppliers.
It would be s trick to make a cake just like Sara Lee, but you can do
better at home, just as many other things are better when home made
instead of mass produced.
Post by Victor Sack
Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least?
It is not difficult at all. You simply mix the ingredients, put it in a
food processor to get it nice and fine, press it into a pan, bake it in
an oven, put a heavy weight on it while it cools a little after baking.
Then slice it thin and. if it has cooled too much, pop it onto a grill
for a minute to warm up. The gyros I have made at home is better than
the last one I bought.
Post by Victor Sack
Correctly made gyros or döner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one.
Oh poppycock. It is no more difficult than making a meat loaf. You just
have to overlook that revolving wad of meat you see on those middle
eastern restaurants, which around here, are the most often closed down
after bouts of food poisoning.
choro
2008-08-21 03:16:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Victor Sack
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
I suppose there are those who consider that the real thing is the
commercially processed stuff that restaurants get from their suppliers.
It would be s trick to make a cake just like Sara Lee, but you can do
better at home, just as many other things are better when home made
instead of mass produced.
Post by Victor Sack
Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least?
It is not difficult at all. You simply mix the ingredients, put it in a
food processor to get it nice and fine, press it into a pan, bake it in
an oven, put a heavy weight on it while it cools a little after baking.
Then slice it thin and. if it has cooled too much, pop it onto a grill
for a minute to warm up. The gyros I have made at home is better than
the last one I bought.
Post by Victor Sack
Correctly made gyros or döner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one.
Oh poppycock. It is no more difficult than making a meat loaf. You just
have to overlook that revolving wad of meat you see on those middle
eastern restaurants, which around here, are the most often closed down
after bouts of food poisoning.
You don't know what you are talking about either, I am afraid to say.

Best keep out of sight of this gastronome before I get my
single-barreled "shotgun" out and screw you right and proper!
--
choro
*****
gogu
2008-08-21 08:01:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Victor Sack
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
I suppose there are those who consider that the real thing is the
commercially processed stuff that restaurants get from their suppliers.
It would be s trick to make a cake just like Sara Lee, but you can do
better at home, just as many other things are better when home made
instead of mass produced.
Post by Victor Sack
Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least?
It is not difficult at all. You simply mix the ingredients, put it in a
food processor to get it nice and fine, press it into a pan, bake it in
an oven, put a heavy weight on it while it cools a little after baking.
Then slice it thin and. if it has cooled too much, pop it onto a grill
for a minute to warm up. The gyros I have made at home is better than
the last one I bought.
Post by Victor Sack
Correctly made gyros or döner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one.
Oh poppycock. It is no more difficult than making a meat loaf. You just
have to overlook that revolving wad of meat you see on those middle
eastern restaurants, which around here, are the most often closed down
after bouts of food poisoning.
You don't know what you are talking about either, I am afraid to say.
Best keep out of sight of this gastronome before I get my single-barreled
"shotgun" out and screw you right and proper!
Ladies and gentlemen, here you can see an extremist Turk in action;-)
Enjoy;-)

As I had anticipated, here "it" is the usual filthy, barbarian Turkish TROLL
trying to flame every posting in scg!
Please ignore "it"!

GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Post by choro
--
choro
*****
Poor Eli Grabmen is a Real Psychopath! LOL
2008-08-21 11:25:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by gogu
Post by choro
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Victor Sack
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
I suppose there are those who consider that the real thing is the
commercially processed stuff that restaurants get from their suppliers.
It would be s trick to make a cake just like Sara Lee, but you can do
better at home, just as many other things are better when home made
instead of mass produced.
Post by Victor Sack
Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least?
It is not difficult at all. You simply mix the ingredients, put it in a
food processor to get it nice and fine, press it into a pan, bake it in
an oven, put a heavy weight on it while it cools a little after baking.
Then slice it thin and. if it has cooled too much, pop it onto a grill
for a minute to warm up. The gyros I have made at home is better than
the last one I bought.
Post by Victor Sack
Correctly made gyros or dφner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one.
Oh poppycock. It is no more difficult than making a meat loaf. You just
have to overlook that revolving wad of meat you see on those middle
eastern restaurants, which around here, are the most often closed down
after bouts of food poisoning.
You don't know what you are talking about either, I am afraid to say.
Best keep out of sight of this gastronome before I get my single-barreled
"shotgun" out and screw you right and proper!
Ladies and gentlemen, here you can see an extremist Turk in action;-)
Enjoy;-)
As I had anticipated, here "it" is the usual filthy, barbarian Turkish TROLL
trying to flame every posting in scg!
Please ignore "it"!
GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Don't forget to include sct and set a f'up to sct when replying to this
slimy pervert, gogu. That way sct gets some of his trash that he keeps
posting in these groups. ;-)
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
choro
2008-08-21 12:19:51 UTC
Permalink
"Poor Eli Grabmen is a Real Psychopath! LOL"
Post by Poor Eli Grabmen is a Real Psychopath! LOL
Post by gogu
Post by choro
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Victor Sack
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
I suppose there are those who consider that the real thing is the
commercially processed stuff that restaurants get from their suppliers.
It would be s trick to make a cake just like Sara Lee, but you can do
better at home, just as many other things are better when home made
instead of mass produced.
Post by Victor Sack
Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least?
It is not difficult at all. You simply mix the ingredients, put it in a
food processor to get it nice and fine, press it into a pan, bake it in
an oven, put a heavy weight on it while it cools a little after baking.
Then slice it thin and. if it has cooled too much, pop it onto a grill
for a minute to warm up. The gyros I have made at home is better than
the last one I bought.
Post by Victor Sack
Correctly made gyros or döner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one.
Oh poppycock. It is no more difficult than making a meat loaf. You just
have to overlook that revolving wad of meat you see on those middle
eastern restaurants, which around here, are the most often closed down
after bouts of food poisoning.
You don't know what you are talking about either, I am afraid to say.
Best keep out of sight of this gastronome before I get my
single-barreled
"shotgun" out and screw you right and proper!
Ladies and gentlemen, here you can see an extremist Turk in action;-)
Enjoy;-)
As I had anticipated, here "it" is the usual filthy, barbarian Turkish TROLL
trying to flame every posting in scg!
Please ignore "it"!
GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Don't forget to include sct and set a f'up to sct when replying to this
slimy pervert, gogu. That way sct gets some of his trash that he keeps
posting in these groups. ;-)
Hi there Panta. Had your solo session with your "massive dildo" today yet?

Don't forget to charge up your batteries though otherwise it might die out
on you before you have your climax.
--
choro
*****
Post by Poor Eli Grabmen is a Real Psychopath! LOL
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 12:52:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
"Poor Eli Grabmen is a Real Psychopath! LOL"
Post by Poor Eli Grabmen is a Real Psychopath! LOL
Post by gogu
Post by choro
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Victor Sack
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
I suppose there are those who consider that the real thing is the
commercially processed stuff that restaurants get from their suppliers.
It would be s trick to make a cake just like Sara Lee, but you can do
better at home, just as many other things are better when home made
instead of mass produced.
Post by Victor Sack
Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least?
It is not difficult at all. You simply mix the ingredients, put it in a
food processor to get it nice and fine, press it into a pan, bake it in
an oven, put a heavy weight on it while it cools a little after baking.
Then slice it thin and. if it has cooled too much, pop it onto a grill
for a minute to warm up. The gyros I have made at home is better than
the last one I bought.
Post by Victor Sack
Correctly made gyros or dφner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one.
Oh poppycock. It is no more difficult than making a meat loaf. You just
have to overlook that revolving wad of meat you see on those middle
eastern restaurants, which around here, are the most often closed down
after bouts of food poisoning.
You don't know what you are talking about either, I am afraid to say.
Best keep out of sight of this gastronome before I get my
single-barreled
"shotgun" out and screw you right and proper!
Ladies and gentlemen, here you can see an extremist Turk in action;-)
Enjoy;-)
As I had anticipated, here "it" is the usual filthy, barbarian Turkish TROLL
trying to flame every posting in scg!
Please ignore "it"!
GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Don't forget to include sct and set a f'up to sct when replying to this
slimy pervert, gogu. That way sct gets some of his trash that he keeps
posting in these groups. ;-)
Hi there Panta. Had your solo session with your "massive dildo" today yet?
Don't forget to charge up your batteries though otherwise it might die out
on you before you have your climax.
<BG>

Still spreading your stench in European newsgroups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
choro
2008-08-21 03:07:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Victor Sack
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
Gyros/döner kebap may be loosely based on some ancient homemade dishes,
but the present incarnation is modern and is a restaurant/commercial
eatery dish and requires special equipment, particularly a vertical
spit, rotating in front of an electric or gas source of radiant heat. It
also requires a special machine to form a tight meat cone, as doing this
properly by hand would usually be too hard even for an experienced
professional cook. Most gyros/döner stands get their meat cones frozen
from some central source; they don't make them themselves. In most
cases, it is a true fast-food operation, in the worst sense of the word.
That said, even the best commercial made-in-situ versions leave rather a
lot to be desired, the dish being among the most overrated of any of
'em, as far as I'm concerned. Why imitate mediocrity?
Anyway, here is what I posted before, regarding actually making real
gyros/döner. Make your own conclusions.
Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least? Correctly made gyros or döner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one. Here's how it is made: Most of the meat is sliced, the rest is
minced. Then, the meat is marinated overnight in a mixture of onion
juice, oil, salt and pepper. Then, the slices are arranged on the spit,
with the tight spaces between them filled with minced meat. The whole
thing is tightly formed and slowly cooked on the rotating spit, with the
meat getting "baked" together into a tight whole. Gradually, as the
outside gets cooked, one shaves off some meat with a sharp knife from
top to bottom, exposing, little by little, the raw interior to the heat,
and continuing in this way until all the meat is cooked and shaved off.
The cooked meat is, of course, supposed to be served throughout the
rather long process, with the juice/sauce that collects underneath.
Victor
Here in Germany, döner kebap is much more popular than anywhere else in
the world. There are some 1,300 döner stands in Berlin alone, way more
than in Istanbul, let alone Athens. But then, of course, gyros/döner is
not all that traditional in its supposed ancestral lands...
Thanks for an informed article on the subject, Victor. I agree with
everything you say. But I'd say that the advantage of the vertical spit
is that the meat can be heated from top to bottom OR by temporarily
turning off sections of the radiant heat only parts of the cone can be
cooked when it is not so busy thus avoiding overcooking.

And my advice to everybody is to buy doner or gyros a while AFTER it
gets busy. That way you will avoid cuts that have been standing cooked
for a long time. Remember döner or gyros are grilled meats and thus must
be eaten as soon as cooked. Also look for layers of actual meat in the
cone rather than just what looks like English sausage mix. Of course,
the mince doner is not bad as such, except that that way they can cheat
and give you what is not really what is known commonly as meat.
--
choro
*****
Panta Rhei
2008-08-21 11:25:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by Victor Sack
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Attempting this without special equipment is a hopeless undertaking.
Ignore anyone telling you otherwise. On the other hand, many home-made
attempted approximations are almost bound to be better than the real
thing, but they won't remotely be that thing. It is akin to trying to
replicate McDonald's hamburger at home, just harder. Below is what I
posted on the matter before.
Gyros/döner kebap may be loosely based on some ancient homemade dishes,
but the present incarnation is modern and is a restaurant/commercial
eatery dish and requires special equipment, particularly a vertical
spit, rotating in front of an electric or gas source of radiant heat. It
also requires a special machine to form a tight meat cone, as doing this
properly by hand would usually be too hard even for an experienced
professional cook. Most gyros/döner stands get their meat cones frozen
from some central source; they don't make them themselves. In most
cases, it is a true fast-food operation, in the worst sense of the word.
That said, even the best commercial made-in-situ versions leave rather a
lot to be desired, the dish being among the most overrated of any of
'em, as far as I'm concerned. Why imitate mediocrity?
Anyway, here is what I posted before, regarding actually making real
gyros/döner. Make your own conclusions.
Making real gyros is not simple, I have to say. Do you have the
necessary equipment (a vertical, slowly revolving spit, akin to a
rotisserie), at least? Correctly made gyros or döner kebap is
definitely not a trivial undertaking for a home cook and, if one aims
for a really good result, is a challenge even to a skilled, professional
one. Here's how it is made: Most of the meat is sliced, the rest is
minced. Then, the meat is marinated overnight in a mixture of onion
juice, oil, salt and pepper. Then, the slices are arranged on the spit,
with the tight spaces between them filled with minced meat. The whole
thing is tightly formed and slowly cooked on the rotating spit, with the
meat getting "baked" together into a tight whole. Gradually, as the
outside gets cooked, one shaves off some meat with a sharp knife from
top to bottom, exposing, little by little, the raw interior to the heat,
and continuing in this way until all the meat is cooked and shaved off.
The cooked meat is, of course, supposed to be served throughout the
rather long process, with the juice/sauce that collects underneath.
Victor
Here in Germany, döner kebap is much more popular than anywhere else in
the world. There are some 1,300 döner stands in Berlin alone, way more
than in Istanbul, let alone Athens. But then, of course, gyros/döner is
not all that traditional in its supposed ancestral lands...
Thanks for an informed article on the subject, Victor. I agree with
Still spreading your stench in Eurpean newsgroups, you subnormal, slimy,
disgusting Turkish piece of shit?

Fuck off to your stinking Turkish newsgroup where you belong, you twisted,
primitive cunt!

F'up to SCT where you skunk you belong.
--
Slimy choro-sick: good at snow jobs, better at blow jobs.
Dave Smith
2008-08-20 23:08:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
You can easily make it at home. You use ground lamb and/or beef and pork
with seasonings and bake it in a loaf pan, then slice it off and grill
it as needed. Last week I posted the recipe that I use and someone else
had already posted a different one. There are lost of gyros recipes
available online.

BTW..... it's really good.
Corey Richardson
2008-08-20 23:29:54 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 19:08:52 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
You can easily make it at home. You use ground lamb and/or beef and pork
with seasonings and bake it in a loaf pan, then slice it off and grill
it as needed. Last week I posted the recipe that I use and someone else
had already posted a different one. There are lost of gyros recipes
available online.
BTW..... it's really good.
I somehow missed your post!

I'll look, but if I can't find it would you be willing to repost it, or
post the message ID, please?

Thanks, Dave!
choro
2008-08-21 03:18:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
You can easily make it at home. You use ground lamb and/or beef and pork
with seasonings and bake it in a loaf pan, then slice it off and grill
it as needed. Last week I posted the recipe that I use and someone else
had already posted a different one. There are lost of gyros recipes
available online.
BTW..... it's really good.
My God! The world must be full of illiterates when it comes to food. How
can you roast meat and then grill it? Beats ME!

You mean you can fuck a girl and still have a virgin?!
--
choro
*****
gogu
2008-08-21 08:04:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by choro
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Corey Richardson
It's known as Döner kebab meat in the UK, but it's also known as Gyros
meat in other parts of the world.
Has anyone here attempted to make their own at home?
Any tips or recipes?
You can easily make it at home. You use ground lamb and/or beef and pork
with seasonings and bake it in a loaf pan, then slice it off and grill it
as needed. Last week I posted the recipe that I use and someone else had
already posted a different one. There are lost of gyros recipes available
online.
BTW..... it's really good.
My God! The world must be full of illiterates when it comes to food. How
can you roast meat and then grill it? Beats ME!
You mean you can fuck a girl and still have a virgin?!
Ladies and gentlemen, here you can see an extremist Turk in action;-)
Foul mouthed, aggressive, no manners, the typical Turkish extremist...
Enjoy;-)

As I had anticipated, here "it" is the usual filthy, barbarian Turkish TROLL
trying to flame every posting in scg!
Please ignore "it"!

GO AWAY you filthy Turkish TROLL!
Post by choro
--
choro
*****
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