Discussion:
Seafood lasagne
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Graham
2021-11-20 23:39:12 UTC
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This is an Anne Willan recipe that I have made many times. It may seem a
bit intricate but it's not difficult and the results are well
worthwhile. I always make double the amount of sauce. I have yet to find
any lasagne recipe that has sufficient sauce or bechamel.

Seafood lasagne (Anne Willan)

250g raw prawns or shrimp
250g scallops
500g lemon sole fillets
2 shallots
30g butter
60ml white wine
15ml vegetable oil
250g fresh or dried lasagne noodles (I use instant)
90g Gruyere cheese
Salt, pepper

For the Sauce (note that I always double this)
1 small onion
500 ml milk
1 Bay leaf
6 peppercorns
500g plum tomatoes (Or used canned chopped tomatoes)
175 g mushrooms
30g butter
30g plain flour
150ml double cream (heavy or whipping)
6-8 sprigs fresh basil and parsley
1.25ml crushed chillies, more to taste

Prepare the seafood, shell shrimp/prawns if need be. Rinse scallops with
cold water, drain and pat them dry with paper towels. Cut very large
scallops in half. Cut the sole fillets into several pieces.

Peel the shallots and separate into sections if necessary. Slice
horizontally towards the root, leaving the slices attached at the
root. Slice vertically, again leaving the root end uncut, then cut
across the shallot to make fine dice.
Heat the butter in a medium saucepan. Add the chopped shallots and
sauté stirring, until soft but not brown, 1-2 minutes. Add the prawns
and scallops and season with salt and pepper.
Cook over medium heat until the prawns turn pink and the scallops
become opaque, 2-3 minutes. Add the white wine and bring just to
boil.
Remove the pan from the heat. With a slotted spoon lift out the prawns
and scallops and reserve them Set the cooking liquid aside.
Making the sauce
Peel and quarter the onion. In a saucepan, combine the onion, bay
leaf, milk and peppercorns. Bring to a boil, then cover and keep in a
warm place, 10 minutes. Meanwhile, peel, deseed, and chop the
tomatoes. Wipe the mushroom caps with damp paper towel and trim the
stalks even with the caps. Set the mushrooms stalk-side down on the
chopping board and slice them. Add the sliced mushrooms to the
reserved prawn and scallop cooking liquid and simmer 2 minutes. Set
aside.
Melt the butter in another saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in the
flour and cook until foaming, 30-60 seconds. Take the pan from the
heat; let cool slightly, then strain in the milk. Whisk to mix.
Return to the heat and cook, whisking constantly until the sauce boils
and thickens, 2-3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and simmer
about 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Pour the double cream into the white sauce and then whisk vigorously
to mix. Strip the parsley and basil leaves from the stalks and
coarsely chop. Stir the herbs into the sauce with the crushed
chillies, salt and pepper. Set the sauce aside.
Peel and chop the tomatoes (or use canned chopped).

Fill a shallow saucepan with water, bring to a boil and add the oil
and 15ml salt. Add noodles one by one and simmer until just tender
3-5 mins for fresh 8-10 for dried.

Heat the oven to 180/350 degrees. Butter the baking dish. Ladle one
quarter of the sauce over the bottom of the prepared dish and arrange
half of the prawns and scallops on top.

Cover the sauce and prawn mix with a layer of noodles. Put the fish
pieces in one layer on top of the lasagne. Coat the fish with one
third of the remaining sauce and cover with lasagne noodles.
Add the rest of the prawns and scallops followed by half of the
remaining sauce, then cover with the remaining lasagne noodles. Ladle
the remaining sauce evenly over the top. Sprinkle with gruyere.

Bake lasagne in the oven until bubbling and golden brown on top, 30-45
minutes.
jmcquown
2021-11-21 00:23:22 UTC
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Post by Graham
This is an Anne Willan recipe that I have made many times. It may seem a
bit intricate but it's not difficult and the results are well
worthwhile. I always make double the amount of sauce. I have yet to find
any lasagne recipe that has sufficient sauce or bechamel.
Seafood lasagne (Anne Willan)
250g   raw prawns or shrimp
250g   scallops
500g   lemon sole fillets
2          shallots
30g    butter
60ml  white wine
15ml  vegetable oil
250g   fresh or dried lasagne noodles (I use instant)
90g  Gruyere cheese
         Salt, pepper
For the Sauce (note that I always double this)
    1 small onion
    500 ml milk
        1 Bay leaf
        6 peppercorns
        500g plum tomatoes (Or used canned chopped tomatoes)
        175 g mushrooms
        30g  butter
        30g plain flour
        150ml double cream (heavy or whipping)
        6-8 sprigs fresh basil and parsley
        1.25ml crushed chillies, more to taste
Prepare the seafood, shell shrimp/prawns if need be.  Rinse scallops with
cold water, drain and pat them dry with paper towels.  Cut very large
scallops in half.  Cut the sole fillets into several pieces.
Peel the shallots and separate into sections if necessary.  Slice
horizontally towards the root, leaving the slices attached at the
root. Slice vertically, again leaving the root end uncut, then cut
across the shallot to make fine dice.
Heat the butter in a medium saucepan.  Add the chopped shallots and
sauté stirring, until soft but not brown, 1-2 minutes.  Add the prawns
and scallops and season with salt and pepper.
Cook over medium heat until the prawns turn pink and the scallops
become opaque, 2-3 minutes.  Add the white wine and bring just to
boil.
Remove the pan from the heat. With a slotted spoon lift out the prawns
and scallops and reserve them   Set the cooking liquid aside.
Making the sauce
Peel and quarter the onion. In a saucepan, combine the onion, bay
leaf, milk and peppercorns.  Bring to a boil, then cover and keep in a
warm place, 10 minutes.  Meanwhile, peel, deseed, and chop the
tomatoes.  Wipe the mushroom caps with damp paper towel and trim the
stalks even with the caps.  Set the mushrooms stalk-side down on the
chopping board and slice them.   Add the sliced mushrooms to the
reserved prawn and scallop cooking liquid and simmer 2 minutes.  Set
aside.
Melt the butter in another saucepan over medium heat.  Whisk in the
flour and cook until foaming, 30-60 seconds.  Take the pan from the
heat; let cool slightly, then strain in the milk.  Whisk to mix.
Return to the heat and cook, whisking constantly until the sauce boils
and thickens, 2-3 minutes.  Season with salt and pepper and simmer
about 2 minutes.  Remove from heat.
Pour the double cream into the white sauce and then whisk vigorously
to mix.   Strip the parsley and basil leaves from the stalks and
coarsely chop.  Stir  the herbs into the sauce with the crushed
chillies, salt and pepper.  Set the sauce aside.
Peel and chop the tomatoes (or use canned chopped).
Fill a shallow saucepan with water, bring to a boil and add the oil
and 15ml salt.  Add noodles one by one and simmer until just tender
3-5 mins for fresh 8-10 for dried.
Heat the oven to 180/350 degrees.  Butter the baking dish.  Ladle one
quarter of the sauce over the bottom of the prepared dish and arrange
half of the prawns and scallops on top.
Cover the sauce and prawn mix with a layer of noodles. Put the fish
pieces in one layer on top of the lasagne.  Coat the fish with one
third of the remaining sauce and cover with lasagne noodles.
Add the rest of the prawns and scallops followed by half of the
remaining sauce, then cover with the remaining lasagne noodles.  Ladle
the remaining sauce evenly over the top.  Sprinkle with gruyere.
Bake lasagne in the oven until bubbling and golden brown on top, 30-45
minutes.
Thank you for reposting this. I think it will be fine thing to have at
Christmas. :)

Jill
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-21 01:14:23 UTC
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Post by Graham
This is an Anne Willan recipe that I have made many times. It may seem a
bit intricate but it's not difficult and the results are well
worthwhile. I always make double the amount of sauce. I have yet to find
any lasagne recipe that has sufficient sauce or bechamel.
Seafood lasagne (Anne Willan)
250g raw prawns or shrimp
250g scallops
500g lemon sole fillets
2 shallots
30g butter
60ml white wine
15ml vegetable oil
250g fresh or dried lasagne noodles (I use instant)
90g Gruyere cheese
Salt, pepper
For the Sauce (note that I always double this)
1 small onion
500 ml milk
1 Bay leaf
6 peppercorns
500g plum tomatoes (Or used canned chopped tomatoes)
175 g mushrooms
30g butter
30g plain flour
150ml double cream (heavy or whipping)
6-8 sprigs fresh basil and parsley
1.25ml crushed chillies, more to taste
Prepare the seafood, shell shrimp/prawns if need be. Rinse scallops with
cold water, drain and pat them dry with paper towels. Cut very large
scallops in half. Cut the sole fillets into several pieces.
Peel the shallots and separate into sections if necessary. Slice
horizontally towards the root, leaving the slices attached at the
root. Slice vertically, again leaving the root end uncut, then cut
across the shallot to make fine dice.
Heat the butter in a medium saucepan. Add the chopped shallots and
sauté stirring, until soft but not brown, 1-2 minutes. Add the prawns
and scallops and season with salt and pepper.
Cook over medium heat until the prawns turn pink and the scallops
become opaque, 2-3 minutes. Add the white wine and bring just to
boil.
Remove the pan from the heat. With a slotted spoon lift out the prawns
and scallops and reserve them Set the cooking liquid aside.
Making the sauce
Peel and quarter the onion. In a saucepan, combine the onion, bay
leaf, milk and peppercorns. Bring to a boil, then cover and keep in a
warm place, 10 minutes. Meanwhile, peel, deseed, and chop the
tomatoes. Wipe the mushroom caps with damp paper towel and trim the
stalks even with the caps. Set the mushrooms stalk-side down on the
chopping board and slice them. Add the sliced mushrooms to the
reserved prawn and scallop cooking liquid and simmer 2 minutes. Set
aside.
Melt the butter in another saucepan over medium heat. Whisk in the
flour and cook until foaming, 30-60 seconds. Take the pan from the
heat; let cool slightly, then strain in the milk. Whisk to mix.
Return to the heat and cook, whisking constantly until the sauce boils
and thickens, 2-3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and simmer
about 2 minutes. Remove from heat.
Pour the double cream into the white sauce and then whisk vigorously
to mix. Strip the parsley and basil leaves from the stalks and
coarsely chop. Stir the herbs into the sauce with the crushed
chillies, salt and pepper. Set the sauce aside.
Peel and chop the tomatoes (or use canned chopped).
Fill a shallow saucepan with water, bring to a boil and add the oil
and 15ml salt. Add noodles one by one and simmer until just tender
3-5 mins for fresh 8-10 for dried.
Heat the oven to 180/350 degrees. Butter the baking dish. Ladle one
quarter of the sauce over the bottom of the prepared dish and arrange
half of the prawns and scallops on top.
Cover the sauce and prawn mix with a layer of noodles. Put the fish
pieces in one layer on top of the lasagne. Coat the fish with one
third of the remaining sauce and cover with lasagne noodles.
Add the rest of the prawns and scallops followed by half of the
remaining sauce, then cover with the remaining lasagne noodles. Ladle
the remaining sauce evenly over the top. Sprinkle with gruyere.
Bake lasagne in the oven until bubbling and golden brown on top, 30-45
minutes.
The "instant" no boil lasagne noodles are easier, but the texture isn't very
good, and vegetable oil usually means soy or canola. Nothing in the
preparation instructions even says what to do with the oil if you are using
the no bake ones, and I boil the noodles without oil anyway. Adding any
oil to pasta boiling water was some stupid thing that we were told to do
in the dark ages.

--Bryan
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-21 10:09:43 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
The "instant" no boil lasagne noodles are easier, but the texture isn't very
good, and vegetable oil usually means soy or canola. Nothing in the
preparation instructions even says what to do with the oil if you are using
the no bake ones, and I boil the noodles without oil anyway. Adding any
oil to pasta boiling water was some stupid thing that we were told to do
in the dark ages.
That's the amazing thing about cooking. The person making the recipe
can decide for themselves what to use when the recipe specifies
"vegetable oil", or decide not to put oil in the pasta water.

Cindy Hamilton
jmcquown
2021-11-21 12:58:30 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bryan Simmons
The "instant" no boil lasagne noodles are easier, but the texture isn't very
good, and vegetable oil usually means soy or canola. Nothing in the
preparation instructions even says what to do with the oil if you are using
the no bake ones, and I boil the noodles without oil anyway. Adding any
oil to pasta boiling water was some stupid thing that we were told to do
in the dark ages.
That's the amazing thing about cooking. The person making the recipe
can decide for themselves what to use when the recipe specifies
"vegetable oil", or decide not to put oil in the pasta water.
Cindy Hamilton
Isn't it grand! From what I understand, the premise behind adding oil
to the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together. It may not
make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will slide right
off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered and baked, sure.
Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together sheets of pasta that
tear when you try to separate them.

Jill
S Viemeister
2021-11-21 13:35:54 UTC
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Isn't it grand!  From what I understand, the premise behind adding oil
to the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together.  It may not
make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will slide right
off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered and baked, sure.
Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together sheets of pasta that
tear when you try to separate them.
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make sure
the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
jmcquown
2021-11-21 13:49:23 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
Isn't it grand!  From what I understand, the premise behind adding oil
to the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together.  It may
not make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will slide
right off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered and baked,
sure. Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together sheets of pasta
that tear when you try to separate them.
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make sure
the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
Graham has always said this lasagna cries out for extra sauce. That may
well compensate for not cooking the noodles first but on my first
attempt I'll boil the noodles and add a little oil to the water. I
don't care if Bryan approves of the oil.

Jill
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-21 13:55:23 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
Post by jmcquown
Isn't it grand! From what I understand, the premise behind adding oil
to the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together. It may
not make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will slide
right off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered and baked,
sure. Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together sheets of pasta
that tear when you try to separate them.
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make sure
the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
Graham has always said this lasagna cries out for extra sauce. That may
well compensate for not cooking the noodles first but on my first
attempt I'll boil the noodles and add a little oil to the water. I
don't care if Bryan approves of the oil.
Of course you don't. You have an advanced case of TIAD. You gob down
canned menudo, and drink shelf stable milk that's only fit for slopping pigs.
Jill
--Bryan
Graham
2021-11-21 14:08:26 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
Isn't it grand!  From what I understand, the premise behind adding
oil to the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together.  It
may not make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will
slide right off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered and
baked, sure. Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together sheets
of pasta that tear when you try to separate them.
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make
sure the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
Graham has always said this lasagna cries out for extra sauce.  That may
well compensate for not cooking the noodles first but on my first
attempt I'll boil the noodles and add a little oil to the water.  I
don't care if Bryan approves of the oil.
Jill
No. The extra sauce is not to hydrate the lasagne. I have found that
there is never enough sauce (or bechamel in meat versions) to cover the
other ingredients.
I bought instant lasagne noodles at an Italian supermarket the other
day. They are much thinner than the ones you have to pre-boil and save
you from that time-consuming and fiddly step.
jmcquown
2021-11-21 14:16:54 UTC
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Post by Graham
Post by S Viemeister
Isn't it grand!  From what I understand, the premise behind adding
oil to the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together.  It
may not make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will
slide right off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered
and baked, sure. Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together
sheets of pasta that tear when you try to separate them.
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make
sure the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
Graham has always said this lasagna cries out for extra sauce.  That
may well compensate for not cooking the noodles first but on my first
attempt I'll boil the noodles and add a little oil to the water.  I
don't care if Bryan approves of the oil.
Jill
No. The extra sauce is not to hydrate the lasagne. I have found that
there is never enough sauce (or bechamel in meat versions) to cover the
other ingredients.
I bought instant lasagne noodles at an Italian supermarket the other
day. They are much thinner than the ones you have to pre-boil and save
you from that time-consuming and fiddly step.
I didn't mean to imply the extra sauce was needed for noodle hydration,
just that it's better that way. I have not tried the instant non-cook
lasagna noodles. I won't be doing that for this first attempt. As with
any new to me recipe, I start with the original and make adjustments
down the road. :)

Jill
bruce bowser
2021-11-21 21:06:18 UTC
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Post by jmcquown
Post by Graham
Post by jmcquown
Post by S Viemeister
Post by jmcquown
Isn't it grand! From what I understand, the premise behind adding
oil to the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together. It
may not make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will
slide right off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered
and baked, sure. Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together
sheets of pasta that tear when you try to separate them.
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make
sure the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
Graham has always said this lasagna cries out for extra sauce. That
may well compensate for not cooking the noodles first but on my first
attempt I'll boil the noodles and add a little oil to the water. I
don't care if Bryan approves of the oil.
Jill
No. The extra sauce is not to hydrate the lasagne. I have found that
there is never enough sauce (or bechamel in meat versions) to cover the
other ingredients.
I bought instant lasagne noodles at an Italian supermarket the other
day. They are much thinner than the ones you have to pre-boil and save
you from that time-consuming and fiddly step.
I didn't mean to imply the extra sauce was needed for noodle hydration,
just that it's better that way. I have not tried the instant non-cook
lasagna noodles. I won't be doing that for this first attempt. As with
any new to me recipe, I start with the original and make adjustments
down the road. :)
Jill, instant non-cook lasagna? That's going way WAAYYY to far. Processed food is going to far out for me.
i***@webtv.net
2021-11-21 21:42:17 UTC
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instant non-cook lasagna? That's going way WAAYYY to far. Processed food is going to far out for me.
I've never been a fan of lasagna and I guess because the sheets are only par cooked
thus resulting in WAY TOO chewy pasta. BUT if I should suffer a blow to the head and
have this irresistible urge to cook that boring dish I'd probably opt to boil those noodles
in a roasting pan. They'd lay flat while simmering and be easily fished out, but I'm just
musing here as that's on my list of things to not do in my lifetime.
bruce bowser
2021-11-22 20:41:33 UTC
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Post by i***@webtv.net
instant non-cook lasagna? That's going way WAAYYY to far. Processed food is going to far out for me.
I've never been a fan of lasagna and I guess because the sheets are only par cooked
thus resulting in WAY TOO chewy pasta.
I seem to remember something about french cooking of using the thicker Ragu sauce if the noodles (lasagne sheets) are also thicker. Oh, well.
Dave Smith
2021-11-21 15:30:16 UTC
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Post by Graham
No. The extra sauce is not to hydrate the lasagne. I have found that
there is never enough sauce (or bechamel in meat versions) to cover
the other ingredients. I bought instant lasagne noodles at an Italian
supermarket the other day. They are much thinner than the ones you
have to pre-boil and save you from that time-consuming and fiddly
step.
If you find pre boiling lasagna noodle to be time consuming and fiddly
you would not like making fresh rolls with rice papers. The pasta can
be precooked and ready to go. The rice rolls are much more labour
intensive because you soak them in warm water for about half a minute,
The go from hard and crisp to workable to wet much in less than a
minute, so you have to do them one at a time.
Michael Trew
2021-11-21 23:39:40 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
Post by jmcquown
Isn't it grand! From what I understand, the premise behind adding oil
to the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together. It may
not make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will slide
right off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered and baked,
sure. Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together sheets of pasta
that tear when you try to separate them.
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make sure
the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
If one made home-made pasta for lasagna, would you think that it also
wouldn't need to be boiled? I don't think I've ever made it before, but
it's something that I've been thinking of. I figured that I might as
well make the pasta myself, since it's just in sheets -- rather than
buying another type of boxed dry pasta to mess with.
S Viemeister
2021-11-22 13:42:13 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by S Viemeister
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make sure
the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
If one made home-made pasta for lasagna, would you think that it also
wouldn't need to be boiled?  I don't think I've ever made it before, but
it's something that I've been thinking of.  I figured that I might as
well make the pasta myself, since it's just in sheets -- rather than
buying another type of boxed dry pasta to mess with.
When I've used my home-made lasagne sheets, I've not pre-boiled them,
and the results were delicious.
Do you have a pasta rolling machine? Or will you be using a rolling pin
and board?
Michael Trew
2021-11-22 17:39:25 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
Post by Michael Trew
Post by S Viemeister
I no longer boil lasagne first. I layer the sheets in dry, and make sure
the sauce is gloppy enough to hydrate the pasta as it bakes.
If one made home-made pasta for lasagna, would you think that it also
wouldn't need to be boiled? I don't think I've ever made it before,
but it's something that I've been thinking of. I figured that I might
as well make the pasta myself, since it's just in sheets -- rather
than buying another type of boxed dry pasta to mess with.
When I've used my home-made lasagne sheets, I've not pre-boiled them,
and the results were delicious.
Thanks!
Post by S Viemeister
Do you have a pasta rolling machine? Or will you be using a rolling pin
and board?
I do have an old pasta roller, picked up years ago at an estate sale.
It's a neat looking thing, but I never cleaned it up. Unless I get the
ambition to clean it, I'll probably use a rolling pin. Do you think it
would be well worth it to clean up the roller/cutter machine instead?
S Viemeister
2021-11-22 19:49:44 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by S Viemeister
When I've used my home-made lasagne sheets, I've not pre-boiled them,
and the results were delicious.
Thanks!
Post by S Viemeister
Do you have a pasta rolling machine? Or will you be using a rolling pin
and board?
I do have an old pasta roller, picked up years ago at an estate sale.
It's a neat looking thing, but I never cleaned it up.  Unless I get the
ambition to clean it, I'll probably use a rolling pin.  Do you think it
would be well worth it to clean up the roller/cutter machine instead?
The machine makes it much easier - but be careful cleaning it up. Most
are not made of stainless steel, and water can and will rust them.
Once you've carefully wiped all the external bits, the easiest way to
clean the rollers and cutters, is with a lump of pasta dough, run
through, over and over again. You'll be amazed at how much schmutz is
removed that way! Finish up with a fresh piece of dough.

I've made lasagne while on holiday at a self-catering place, using a
wine bottle as a rolling pin on a kitchen counter. It's certainly
do-able - but the machine is faster, easier, and gives a more consistent
thickness to the dough.
Michael Trew
2021-11-23 04:14:21 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
The machine makes it much easier - but be careful cleaning it up. Most
are not made of stainless steel, and water can and will rust them.
Once you've carefully wiped all the external bits, the easiest way to
clean the rollers and cutters, is with a lump of pasta dough, run
through, over and over again. You'll be amazed at how much schmutz is
removed that way! Finish up with a fresh piece of dough.
I've made lasagne while on holiday at a self-catering place, using a
wine bottle as a rolling pin on a kitchen counter. It's certainly
do-able - but the machine is faster, easier, and gives a more consistent
thickness to the dough.
Thanks! I got the thing years ago, and unfortunately never took a
second look at it. I just pulled it out, and it does appear to be
stainless, I think. It's not pretty up under it; seen in one of the photos.

https://postimg.cc/gallery/Zq90Rw9
S Viemeister
2021-11-23 12:59:30 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
The machine makes it much easier - but be careful cleaning it up. Most
are not made of stainless steel, and water can and will rust them.
Once you've carefully wiped all the external bits, the easiest way to
clean the rollers and cutters, is with a lump of pasta dough, run
through, over and over again. You'll be amazed at how much schmutz is
removed that way! Finish up with a fresh piece of dough.
I've made lasagne while on holiday at a self-catering place, using a
wine bottle as a rolling pin on a kitchen counter. It's certainly
do-able - but the machine is faster, easier, and gives a more consistent
thickness to the dough.
Thanks!  I got the thing years ago, and unfortunately never took a
second look at it.  I just pulled it out, and it does appear to be
stainless, I think.  It's not pretty up under it; seen in one of the
photos.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/Zq90Rw9
There may be stainless bits, but I would be very surprised if all of it
is stainless. It's rather uncommon with these machines - I've seen a
few, and they tend to be very expensive 'luxury' models.
Be careful not to let water get into any nooks and crannies, just in case.
Nickel-plating is very common on these machines - once that gets
scratched or pitted, then wet, you can have major problems with corrosion.
Gary
2021-11-23 13:51:34 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
The machine makes it much easier - but be careful cleaning it up. Most
are not made of stainless steel, and water can and will rust them.
Once you've carefully wiped all the external bits, the easiest way to
clean the rollers and cutters, is with a lump of pasta dough, run
through, over and over again. You'll be amazed at how much schmutz is
removed that way! Finish up with a fresh piece of dough.
I've made lasagne while on holiday at a self-catering place, using a
wine bottle as a rolling pin on a kitchen counter. It's certainly
do-able - but the machine is faster, easier, and gives a more consistent
thickness to the dough.
Thanks!  I got the thing years ago, and unfortunately never took a
second look at it.  I just pulled it out, and it does appear to be
stainless, I think.  It's not pretty up under it; seen in one of the
photos.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/Zq90Rw9
That definitely looks like stainless steel. You should clean that up and
use it. I would. Fresh pasta so 'Trumps' the boxed dry pasta.

I also add an egg to homemade pasta. Same recipe for pasta and egg
noodles. Mario Batalli does that and I agree.
Michael Trew
2021-11-24 16:22:25 UTC
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Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
Post by S Viemeister
The machine makes it much easier - but be careful cleaning it up. Most
are not made of stainless steel, and water can and will rust them.
Once you've carefully wiped all the external bits, the easiest way to
clean the rollers and cutters, is with a lump of pasta dough, run
through, over and over again. You'll be amazed at how much schmutz is
removed that way! Finish up with a fresh piece of dough.
I've made lasagne while on holiday at a self-catering place, using a
wine bottle as a rolling pin on a kitchen counter. It's certainly
do-able - but the machine is faster, easier, and gives a more consistent
thickness to the dough.
Thanks! I got the thing years ago, and unfortunately never took a
second look at it. I just pulled it out, and it does appear to be
stainless, I think. It's not pretty up under it; seen in one of the photos.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/Zq90Rw9
That definitely looks like stainless steel. You should clean that up and
use it. I would. Fresh pasta so 'Trumps' the boxed dry pasta.
I also add an egg to homemade pasta. Same recipe for pasta and egg
noodles. Mario Batalli does that and I agree.
I don't know if it's plated nickle or stainless, but I'll be careful...
and will likely have to scour that rusty spot inside with a dry steel
wool pad.

What's the benefit to an egg in pasta?
Cindy Hamilton
2021-11-24 16:44:39 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
Post by S Viemeister
The machine makes it much easier - but be careful cleaning it up. Most
are not made of stainless steel, and water can and will rust them.
Once you've carefully wiped all the external bits, the easiest way to
clean the rollers and cutters, is with a lump of pasta dough, run
through, over and over again. You'll be amazed at how much schmutz is
removed that way! Finish up with a fresh piece of dough.
I've made lasagne while on holiday at a self-catering place, using a
wine bottle as a rolling pin on a kitchen counter. It's certainly
do-able - but the machine is faster, easier, and gives a more consistent
thickness to the dough.
Thanks! I got the thing years ago, and unfortunately never took a
second look at it. I just pulled it out, and it does appear to be
stainless, I think. It's not pretty up under it; seen in one of the
photos.
https://postimg.cc/gallery/Zq90Rw9
That definitely looks like stainless steel. You should clean that up and
use it. I would. Fresh pasta so 'Trumps' the boxed dry pasta.
I also add an egg to homemade pasta. Same recipe for pasta and egg
noodles. Mario Batalli does that and I agree.
I don't know if it's plated nickle or stainless, but I'll be careful...
and will likely have to scour that rusty spot inside with a dry steel
wool pad.
What's the benefit to an egg in pasta?
I think the question is: Why would you use anything other than egg as
the liquid in pasta?

flour + egg + salt = pasta

<https://www.seriouseats.com/best-easy-all-purpose-fresh-pasta-dough-recipe-instructions>

Cindy Hamilton
S Viemeister
2021-11-24 18:27:28 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
I also add an egg to homemade pasta. Same recipe for pasta and egg
noodles. Mario Batalli does that and I agree.
I don't know if it's plated nickle or stainless, but I'll be careful...
and will likely have to scour that rusty spot inside with a dry steel
wool pad.
What's the benefit to an egg in pasta?
It tastes good!
Also, it holds its shape better - doesn't get all 'pasty' even if
slightly over-cooked.

Duck eggs are really good for making pasta.

Michael Trew
2021-11-21 23:37:02 UTC
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On Saturday, November 20, 2021 at 8:14:27 PM UTC-5,
Post by Bryan Simmons
The "instant" no boil lasagne noodles are easier, but the texture isn't very
good, and vegetable oil usually means soy or canola. Nothing in the
preparation instructions even says what to do with the oil if you are using
the no bake ones, and I boil the noodles without oil anyway. Adding any
oil to pasta boiling water was some stupid thing that we were told to do
in the dark ages.
That's the amazing thing about cooking. The person making the recipe
can decide for themselves what to use when the recipe specifies
"vegetable oil", or decide not to put oil in the pasta water.
Cindy Hamilton
Isn't it grand! From what I understand, the premise behind adding oil to
the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together. It may not
make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will slide right
off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered and baked, sure.
Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together sheets of pasta that
tear when you try to separate them.
Jill
I believe the oil in the water is an old wives tale. My mother did it;
I tried it, and it didn't seem to make a difference (waste of oil).
However, I've heard adding some salt to the boiling water, aside from
flavoring the pasta, will help to prevent some sticking. I don't make
it nearly "as salty as the sea", as I've heard suggested, but maybe a
Tbsp or two in a large pot of water.
Dave Smith
2021-11-22 00:19:54 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Trew
On Saturday, November 20, 2021 at 8:14:27 PM UTC-5,
Post by Bryan Simmons
The "instant" no boil lasagne noodles are easier, but the texture isn't very
good, and vegetable oil usually means soy or canola. Nothing in the
preparation instructions even says what to do with the oil if you are using
the no bake ones, and I boil the noodles without oil anyway. Adding any
oil to pasta boiling water was some stupid thing that we were told to do
in the dark ages.
That's the amazing thing about cooking. The person making the recipe
can decide for themselves what to use when the recipe specifies
"vegetable oil", or decide not to put oil in the pasta water.
Cindy Hamilton
Isn't it grand! From what I understand, the premise behind adding oil to
the water is to prevent the pasta from sticking together. It may not
make sense with something like spaghetti (the sauce will slide right
off) but for sheets of lasagna that are to be layered and baked, sure.
Or don't add it and wind up with stuck together sheets of pasta that
tear when you try to separate them.
Jill
I believe the oil in the water is an old wives tale.
It's not an old wives tale. It happens.
Bryan Simmons
2021-11-21 13:51:34 UTC
Reply
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Post by Bryan Simmons
The "instant" no boil lasagne noodles are easier, but the texture isn't very
good, and vegetable oil usually means soy or canola. Nothing in the
preparation instructions even says what to do with the oil if you are using
the no bake ones, and I boil the noodles without oil anyway. Adding any
oil to pasta boiling water was some stupid thing that we were told to do
in the dark ages.
That's the amazing thing about cooking. The person making the recipe
can decide for themselves what to use when the recipe specifies
"vegetable oil", or decide not to put oil in the pasta water.
That's why following recipes is fairly stupid, especially recipes written
by idiots who advise putting oil in your pasta boiling water.
Cindy Hamilton
--Bryan
Mike Duffy
2021-11-21 14:58:41 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
That's why following recipes is fairly stupid, especially recipes
written by idiots who advise putting oil in your pasta boiling water.
Yabbut if you leave out the oil won't it pretty much guarantee that the
pasta will stick to the wall whether it's cooked or not?
jmcquown
2021-11-21 16:35:06 UTC
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Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's why following recipes is fairly stupid, especially recipes
written by idiots who advise putting oil in your pasta boiling water.
Yabbut if you leave out the oil won't it pretty much guarantee that the
pasta will stick to the wall whether it's cooked or not?
When it comes to sheets of lasagna, DUH. ;)

Jill
Dave Smith
2021-11-22 00:24:49 UTC
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On Saturday, November 20, 2021 at 8:14:27 PM UTC-5,
n the dark ages.
That's the amazing thing about cooking. The person making the recipe
can decide for themselves what to use when the recipe specifies
"vegetable oil", or decide not to put oil in the pasta water.
A bit of oil in the pasta water breaks the surface tension and helps to
prevent it from boiling over. I don't need to bother because I usually
cook it only in small amounts so I don't need to fill the pot as much.
That's an interesting theory, and it makes much more sense than the
other reasons that I've heard for the oil in the water.
It's the only reason for adding oil that I have ever bought into. I get
around it by using a large enough pot, put if I still have trouble with
it boiling over I add a little oil and the froth recedes.
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