Discussion:
Seasoned fries
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Bryan Simmons
2021-10-08 23:17:27 UTC
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I made plain cheeseburgers with experimental fries. I gave them their first fry,
let them cool, then seasoned them with Penzey's Northwoods and some added
black pepper. Then I shook them with rice flour and some finely powdered salt
before frying them again. Here they are, fit to be fried.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/***@N08/51567397855/in/dateposted-public/

They turned out well.

--Bryan
Michael Trew
2021-10-09 00:06:40 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
I made plain cheeseburgers with experimental fries. I gave them their first fry,
let them cool, then seasoned them with Penzey's Northwoods and some added
black pepper. Then I shook them with rice flour and some finely powdered salt
before frying them again. Here they are, fit to be fried.
They turned out well.
--Bryan
Won't the seasoning foul your frying oil?
Bryan Simmons
2021-10-09 01:52:07 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
I made plain cheeseburgers with experimental fries. I gave them their first fry,
let them cool, then seasoned them with Penzey's Northwoods and some added
black pepper. Then I shook them with rice flour and some finely powdered salt
before frying them again. Here they are, fit to be fried.
They turned out well.
--Bryan
Won't the seasoning foul your frying oil?
To some extent, yes, but because of my wife's sensitivity to oil that is
the least bit imperfect, I have to change the oil more frequently anyway.
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred dollars a year,
but it's only a few hundred dollars a year, and we are in pretty good
shape financially. We are steadily building wealth for retirement.

I still try to save money on purchases. At the grocery store, they
couponed some meat items sloppily. They put $3 off coupons on all
the meat with 10/11 sell by dates, including some chicken drumsticks
with an original price of $3.18. I got 5 chicken legs for 18 cents, and
fried those for lunch.

--Bryan
Mike Duffy
2021-10-09 02:45:36 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred dollars a year,
but it's only a few hundred dollars a year, and we are in pretty good
shape financially. We are steadily building wealth for retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck and convert
it to run on vegetable oil? You could start stockpiling now, and by the
time you retire you could drive all over the country without ever
visiting a gas pump again.
Bryan Simmons
2021-10-09 12:09:00 UTC
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Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred dollars a year,
but it's only a few hundred dollars a year, and we are in pretty good
shape financially. We are steadily building wealth for retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck and convert
it to run on vegetable oil? You could start stockpiling now, and by the
time you retire you could drive all over the country without ever
visiting a gas pump again.
I'm pretty sure that my old oil does end up as biodiesel. I've got 5 one gallon
jugs full of it that I can take to my nephew's restaurant to dump in their
grease bin, and that's what happens to old fryer oil. It generally gets mixed
in with regular diesel fuel at low concentrations.

--Bryan
Mike Duffy
2021-10-09 13:41:37 UTC
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my old oil [...] to my nephew's restaurant [...] grease bin
[...] It generally gets mixed in with regular diesel fuel
at low concentrations.
I did not know that. I knew it could be used as engine fuel, but needed
special modes to the injectors, &c. Thanks,


Probably most restaurant oil ends up in truck exhaust then.

I wonder who pays, the oilco for the material, or the resto for the
disposal. Any idea? What about solid animal fat grease from grease-traps?
Bryan Simmons
2021-10-09 14:04:54 UTC
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Post by Mike Duffy
my old oil [...] to my nephew's restaurant [...] grease bin
[...] It generally gets mixed in with regular diesel fuel
at low concentrations.
I did not know that. I knew it could be used as engine fuel, but needed
special modes to the injectors, &c. Thanks,
Probably most restaurant oil ends up in truck exhaust then.
I wonder who pays, the oilco for the material, or the resto for the
disposal. Any idea? What about solid animal fat grease from grease-traps?
Smaller restaurants like my nephew's, the company pumps it out and no
money is exchanged. Larger restaurants get paid, and have padlocks on
their grease bins. I don't know how that horrid stuff from grease traps is
disposed of.

--Bryan
i***@webtv.net
2021-10-09 17:39:43 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Probably most restaurant oil ends up in truck exhaust then.
I wonder who pays, the oilco for the material, or the resto for the
disposal. Any idea? What about solid animal fat grease from grease-traps?
Smaller restaurants like my nephew's, the company pumps it out and no
money is exchanged. Larger restaurants get paid, and have padlocks on
their grease bins. I don't know how that horrid stuff from grease traps is
disposed of.
--Bryan
I've seen those small tanker trucks at restaurants, Outback Steakhouse
comes to mind. I don't know if any money is exchanged or not. But they're
probably glad to get rid of the old oil and the used oil company is probably
glad to take it.

My former boss had a "grease car" but he was having other issues with it
so ended his affair with converting that used grease into fuel.
bruce bowser
2021-10-09 19:39:24 UTC
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Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Probably most restaurant oil ends up in truck exhaust then.
I wonder who pays, the oilco for the material, or the resto for the
disposal. Any idea? What about solid animal fat grease from grease-traps?
Smaller restaurants like my nephew's, the company pumps it out and no
money is exchanged. Larger restaurants get paid, and have padlocks on
their grease bins. I don't know how that horrid stuff from grease traps is
disposed of.
--Bryan
I've seen those small tanker trucks at restaurants, Outback Steakhouse
comes to mind. I don't know if any money is exchanged or not. But they're
probably glad to get rid of the old oil and the used oil company is probably
glad to take it.
My former boss had a "grease car" but he was having other issues with it
so ended his affair with converting that used grease into fuel.
Solar power will be running boilers pretty soon. They're more efficient than oil burning ones.
Michael Trew
2021-10-10 03:20:49 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Probably most restaurant oil ends up in truck exhaust then.
I wonder who pays, the oilco for the material, or the resto for the
disposal. Any idea? What about solid animal fat grease from grease-traps?
Smaller restaurants like my nephew's, the company pumps it out and no
money is exchanged. Larger restaurants get paid, and have padlocks on
their grease bins. I don't know how that horrid stuff from grease traps is
disposed of.
--Bryan
I've seen those small tanker trucks at restaurants, Outback Steakhouse
comes to mind. I don't know if any money is exchanged or not. But they're
probably glad to get rid of the old oil and the used oil company is probably
glad to take it.
My former boss had a "grease car" but he was having other issues with it
so ended his affair with converting that used grease into fuel.
Solar power will be running boilers pretty soon. They're more efficient than oil burning ones.
Oil heat is insanely expensive
S Viemeister
2021-10-10 11:52:23 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
Solar power will be running boilers pretty soon.  They're more
efficient than oil burning ones.
Oil heat is insanely expensive
Our place in Scotland is about 100 miles away from the nearest gas main.
We use oil for our heating - electricity would be a budget-wrecker.
Michael Trew
2021-10-10 14:58:37 UTC
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Post by S Viemeister
Post by Michael Trew
Post by bruce bowser
Solar power will be running boilers pretty soon. They're more
efficient than oil burning ones.
Oil heat is insanely expensive
Our place in Scotland is about 100 miles away from the nearest gas main.
We use oil for our heating - electricity would be a budget-wrecker.
Yes, electric is even more costly. At least in my area, oil heat is
nearly twice the cost of natural gas heat, but still cheaper than electric.
Dave Smith
2021-10-10 15:51:59 UTC
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il heat is insanely expensive
Post by S Viemeister
Our place in Scotland is about 100 miles away from the nearest gas main.
We use oil for our heating - electricity would be a budget-wrecker.
Yes, electric is even more costly.  At least in my area, oil heat is
nearly twice the cost of natural gas heat, but still cheaper than electric.
It was about 8 years ago that I switched from oil to high efficiency
natural gas. My oil had been on equal billing over 10 months at $300
per month. When I went gas I also got a gas hot water tank. Now I pay
monthly for natural gas. The biggest gas bill the first year was for
February and it was $148. During the warm months I pay only for the hot
water and with billing fees it runs about $32/month. Oil prices are way
up now. I saved a bundle by going gas.
Graham
2021-10-10 16:06:15 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
il heat is insanely expensive
Post by S Viemeister
Our place in Scotland is about 100 miles away from the nearest gas main.
We use oil for our heating - electricity would be a budget-wrecker.
Yes, electric is even more costly.  At least in my area, oil heat is
nearly twice the cost of natural gas heat, but still cheaper than electric.
It was about 8 years ago that I switched from oil to high efficiency
natural gas.  My oil had been on equal billing over 10 months at $300
per month.  When I went gas I also got a gas hot water tank.  Now I pay
monthly for natural gas. The biggest gas bill the first year was for
February and it was $148. During the warm months I pay only for the hot
water and with billing fees it runs about $32/month.  Oil prices are way
up now. I saved a bundle by going gas.
I paid about $100 for the gas last February but admin and distribution
charges more than doubled the bill. I paid about $50 for the electricity
but those same extras more than double the bill.

Some years ago, our provincial conservative government opened up the gas
and electricity systems to give us more choice in our suppliers but all
it did was to increase the size of our bills!
GM
2021-10-10 16:10:08 UTC
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Post by Graham
Some years ago, our provincial conservative government opened up the gas
and electricity systems to give us more choice in our suppliers but all
it did was to increase the size of our bills!
Good show that they got rid of those pesky socialist subsidies, Graham...!!!

In a well - functioning capitalist market economy, prices reflect the "true" value
of goods and services...

:-)
--
GM
bruce bowser
2021-10-10 16:36:49 UTC
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Post by GM
Post by Graham
Some years ago, our provincial conservative government opened up the gas
and electricity systems to give us more choice in our suppliers but all
it did was to increase the size of our bills!
Good show that they got rid of those pesky socialist subsidies, Graham...!!!
In a well - functioning capitalist market economy, prices reflect the "true" value
of goods and services...
You're dreaming. All that is just Virginia dreaming.
Graham
2021-10-10 18:14:48 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Post by GM
Post by Graham
Some years ago, our provincial conservative government opened up the gas
and electricity systems to give us more choice in our suppliers but all
it did was to increase the size of our bills!
Good show that they got rid of those pesky socialist subsidies, Graham...!!!
In a well - functioning capitalist market economy, prices reflect the "true" value
of goods and services...
You're dreaming. All that is just Virginia dreaming.
Not only that!
The gas and power COMPANIES then concentrated on generation and
distribution, selling off their local delivery assets to 3rd party
"billing" companies. That added layer increased domestic bills.
bruce bowser
2021-10-10 16:37:49 UTC
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Permalink
Post by GM
Post by Graham
Some years ago, our provincial conservative government opened up the gas
and electricity systems to give us more choice in our suppliers but all
it did was to increase the size of our bills!
Good show that they got rid of those pesky socialist subsidies, Graham...!!!
Strangely, you wouldn't say that if it involved oil and gas, coal or the defense industry.
Graham
2021-10-10 18:16:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by GM
Post by Graham
Some years ago, our provincial conservative government opened up the gas
and electricity systems to give us more choice in our suppliers but all
it did was to increase the size of our bills!
Good show that they got rid of those pesky socialist subsidies, Graham...!!!
There were none! the companies were private.
GM
2021-10-10 18:21:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by GM
Post by Graham
Some years ago, our provincial conservative government opened up the gas
and electricity systems to give us more choice in our suppliers but all
it did was to increase the size of our bills!
Good show that they got rid of those pesky socialist subsidies, Graham...!!!
There were none! the companies were private.
😎
--
GM
Michael Trew
2021-10-11 00:03:31 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
il heat is insanely expensive
Post by Michael Trew
Post by S Viemeister
Our place in Scotland is about 100 miles away from the nearest gas main.
We use oil for our heating - electricity would be a budget-wrecker.
Yes, electric is even more costly. At least in my area, oil heat is
nearly twice the cost of natural gas heat, but still cheaper than electric.
It was about 8 years ago that I switched from oil to high efficiency
natural gas. My oil had been on equal billing over 10 months at $300 per
month. When I went gas I also got a gas hot water tank. Now I pay
monthly for natural gas. The biggest gas bill the first year was for
February and it was $148. During the warm months I pay only for the hot
water and with billing fees it runs about $32/month. Oil prices are way
up now. I saved a bundle by going gas.
That sounds about right.. I was helping the antique mall owner move some
stuff around after work one day, and I saw the massive 100+ year old
coal boilers in the cellar, retrofitted to burn oil, and the huge oil
tanks. Three of them heated almost all of the 40,000 sq ft mall, and
the heating bills for oil were out of this world.

He stopped using the oil burners 3 years ago, and installed 6 high
efficiency natural gas forced air furnaces in their place, utilizing
duct work from old central air units where he could. I believe the cost
to heat the building was cut to at least a third of what it was before.
S Viemeister
2021-10-10 16:31:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by S Viemeister
Post by Michael Trew
Solar power will be running boilers pretty soon.  They're more
efficient than oil burning ones.
Oil heat is insanely expensive
Our place in Scotland is about 100 miles away from the nearest gas main.
We use oil for our heating - electricity would be a budget-wrecker.
Yes, electric is even more costly.  At least in my area, oil heat is
nearly twice the cost of natural gas heat, but still cheaper than electric.
Fortunately, our house is heavily insulated, with double-glazed
tight-fitting doors and windows, and the boiler is a condensing combi.
Also, the front of the house faces south, so we benefit from free solar
heat in the winter.
bruce bowser
2021-10-10 14:54:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Probably most restaurant oil ends up in truck exhaust then.
I wonder who pays, the oilco for the material, or the resto for the
disposal. Any idea? What about solid animal fat grease from grease-traps?
Smaller restaurants like my nephew's, the company pumps it out and no
money is exchanged. Larger restaurants get paid, and have padlocks on
their grease bins. I don't know how that horrid stuff from grease traps is
disposed of.
--Bryan
I've seen those small tanker trucks at restaurants, Outback Steakhouse
comes to mind. I don't know if any money is exchanged or not. But they're
probably glad to get rid of the old oil and the used oil company is probably
glad to take it.
My former boss had a "grease car" but he was having other issues with it
so ended his affair with converting that used grease into fuel.
Solar power will be running boilers pretty soon. They're more efficient than oil burning ones.
Oil heat is insanely expensive
A friendly neighborhood call to a local solar energy provider might not hurt.
Mike Duffy
2021-10-09 19:37:05 UTC
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Permalink
I don't know how that horrid stuff from grease trap is disposed of.
Ingredients: ... Meat by-products ...
Hank Rogers
2021-10-09 22:59:44 UTC
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Post by Mike Duffy
I don't know how that horrid stuff from grease trap is disposed of.
Ingredients: ... Meat by-products ...
Thank you Master Druce!
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-09 14:23:03 UTC
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On Sat, 9 Oct 2021 05:09:00 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred dollars a year,
but it's only a few hundred dollars a year, and we are in pretty good
shape financially. We are steadily building wealth for retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck and convert
it to run on vegetable oil? You could start stockpiling now, and by the
time you retire you could drive all over the country without ever
visiting a gas pump again.
I'm pretty sure that my old oil does end up as biodiesel. I've got 5 one gallon
jugs full of it that I can take to my nephew's restaurant to dump in their
grease bin, and that's what happens to old fryer oil. It generally gets mixed
in with regular diesel fuel at low concentrations.
--Bryan
In colder climates a lot of businesses converted their heating systems
to burning old engine and frying oil The new Tractor Supply Store
here did and provided for collecting old oil.
Michael Trew
2021-10-10 03:21:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 9 Oct 2021 05:09:00 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred dollars a year,
but it's only a few hundred dollars a year, and we are in pretty good
shape financially. We are steadily building wealth for retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck and convert
it to run on vegetable oil? You could start stockpiling now, and by the
time you retire you could drive all over the country without ever
visiting a gas pump again.
I'm pretty sure that my old oil does end up as biodiesel. I've got 5 one gallon
jugs full of it that I can take to my nephew's restaurant to dump in their
grease bin, and that's what happens to old fryer oil. It generally gets mixed
in with regular diesel fuel at low concentrations.
--Bryan
In colder climates a lot of businesses converted their heating systems
to burning old engine and frying oil The new Tractor Supply Store
here did and provided for collecting old oil.
A mechanic that I've been to has a heating system in his garage that
burns used motor oil. He's requested that I take my old oil in.
Hank Rogers
2021-10-10 04:13:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 9 Oct 2021 05:09:00 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred
dollars a year,
but it's only a few hundred dollars a year, and we are in
pretty good
shape financially. We are steadily building wealth for
retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck and convert
it to run on vegetable oil? You could start stockpiling now, and by the
time you retire you could drive all over the country without ever
visiting a gas pump again.
I'm pretty sure that my old oil does end up as biodiesel.  I've
got 5 one gallon
jugs full of it that I can take to my nephew's restaurant to
dump in their
grease bin, and that's what happens to old fryer oil.  It
generally gets mixed
in with regular diesel fuel at low concentrations.
--Bryan
In colder climates a lot of businesses converted their heating systems
to burning old engine and frying oil  The new Tractor Supply Store
here did and provided for collecting old oil.
A mechanic that I've been to has a heating system in his garage
that burns used motor oil.  He's requested that I take my old oil in.
You have to have a proper stove to burn the stuff.

A garage I know got busted for burning used motor oil. It was long
ago. Old country boy rigged up a setup to drip feed the oil into an
ashley wood burning stove. No telling how long he did it before
being caught.
Michael Trew
2021-10-10 14:57:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hank Rogers
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 9 Oct 2021 05:09:00 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred dollars a year,
but it's only a few hundred dollars a year, and we are in pretty good
shape financially. We are steadily building wealth for retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck and convert
it to run on vegetable oil? You could start stockpiling now, and by the
time you retire you could drive all over the country without ever
visiting a gas pump again.
I'm pretty sure that my old oil does end up as biodiesel. I've got 5 one gallon
jugs full of it that I can take to my nephew's restaurant to dump in their
grease bin, and that's what happens to old fryer oil. It generally gets mixed
in with regular diesel fuel at low concentrations.
--Bryan
In colder climates a lot of businesses converted their heating systems
to burning old engine and frying oil The new Tractor Supply Store
here did and provided for collecting old oil.
A mechanic that I've been to has a heating system in his garage that
burns used motor oil. He's requested that I take my old oil in.
You have to have a proper stove to burn the stuff.
A garage I know got busted for burning used motor oil. It was long ago.
Old country boy rigged up a setup to drip feed the oil into an ashley
wood burning stove. No telling how long he did it before being caught.
I'm not sure what the regulations are here, but he has an actual motor
oil burning furnace, that's what's stamped into the sheet metal.
cshenk
2021-10-10 15:16:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 9 Oct 2021 05:09:00 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred
dollars a year, but it's only a few hundred dollars a year,
and we are in pretty good shape financially. We are steadily
building wealth for retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck and
convert it to run on vegetable oil? You could start stockpiling
now, and by the time you retire you could drive all over the
country without ever visiting a gas pump again.
I'm pretty sure that my old oil does end up as biodiesel. I've
got 5 one gallon jugs full of it that I can take to my nephew's
restaurant to dump in their grease bin, and that's what happens
to old fryer oil. It generally gets mixed in with regular diesel
fuel at low concentrations.
--Bryan
In colder climates a lot of businesses converted their heating
systems to burning old engine and frying oil The new Tractor
Supply Store here did and provided for collecting old oil.
A mechanic that I've been to has a heating system in his garage that
burns used motor oil. He's requested that I take my old oil in.
I've always thought those innovative sounding! I picture a remote
community, far from the grid.
Michael Trew
2021-10-11 14:54:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by cshenk
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 9 Oct 2021 05:09:00 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred
dollars a year, but it's only a few hundred dollars a year,
and we are in pretty good shape financially. We are steadily
building wealth for retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck and
convert it to run on vegetable oil? You could start stockpiling
now, and by the time you retire you could drive all over the
country without ever visiting a gas pump again.
I'm pretty sure that my old oil does end up as biodiesel. I've
got 5 one gallon jugs full of it that I can take to my nephew's
restaurant to dump in their grease bin, and that's what happens
to old fryer oil. It generally gets mixed in with regular diesel
fuel at low concentrations.
--Bryan
In colder climates a lot of businesses converted their heating
systems to burning old engine and frying oil The new Tractor
Supply Store here did and provided for collecting old oil.
A mechanic that I've been to has a heating system in his garage that
burns used motor oil. He's requested that I take my old oil in.
I've always thought those innovative sounding! I picture a remote
community, far from the grid.
He's with the village limits; the next community to me, maybe with a few
thousand people. I imagine it's a very cheap way to heat his shop.
cshenk
2021-10-16 19:38:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by cshenk
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sat, 9 Oct 2021 05:09:00 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Bryan Simmons
That's an extra expense that will total to a few hundred
dollars a year, but it's only a few hundred dollars a
year, and we are in pretty good shape financially. We are
steadily building wealth for retirement.
Gosh, Bryan. Why don't you get a diesel-engine tanker truck
and convert it to run on vegetable oil? You could start
stockpiling now, and by the time you retire you could drive
all over the country without ever visiting a gas pump again.
I'm pretty sure that my old oil does end up as biodiesel.
I've got 5 one gallon jugs full of it that I can take to my
nephew's restaurant to dump in their grease bin, and that's
what happens to old fryer oil. It generally gets mixed in
with regular diesel fuel at low concentrations.
--Bryan
In colder climates a lot of businesses converted their heating
systems to burning old engine and frying oil The new Tractor
Supply Store here did and provided for collecting old oil.
A mechanic that I've been to has a heating system in his garage
that burns used motor oil. He's requested that I take my old oil
in.
I've always thought those innovative sounding! I picture a remote
community, far from the grid.
He's with the village limits; the next community to me, maybe with a
few thousand people. I imagine it's a very cheap way to heat his
shop.
Yes, it would be and no reason to not give that oil a useful final life.
Sheldon Martin
2021-10-09 11:50:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Oct 2021 16:17:27 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
I made plain cheeseburgers with experimental fries. I gave them their first fry,
let them cool, then seasoned them with Penzey's Northwoods and some added
black pepper. Then I shook them with rice flour and some finely powdered salt
before frying them again. Here they are, fit to be fried.
They turned out well.
--Bryan
Yik! Those look like parasites.
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