Discussion:
Green Chile Stew and Chips
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Sqwertz
2021-09-09 01:13:02 UTC
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Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.

Loading Image...

And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>

-sw
Bruce 3.2
2021-09-09 01:25:11 UTC
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Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>
Nah, I just hope you didn't forget to add some chili pepper.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-09 08:07:37 UTC
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Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>
Shitty canola oil. Seems like they could afford an extra penny or
two to use decent oil.
Post by Sqwertz
-sw
--Bryan
Bruce 3.2
2021-09-09 08:09:46 UTC
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On Thu, 9 Sep 2021 01:07:37 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>
Shitty canola oil. Seems like they could afford an extra penny or
two to use decent oil.
Strange how you eat the cheapest of the cheapest but have a hangup
about oil.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-09 08:13:45 UTC
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Post by Bruce 3.2
On Thu, 9 Sep 2021 01:07:37 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>
Shitty canola oil. Seems like they could afford an extra penny or
two to use decent oil.
Strange how you eat the cheapest of the cheapest but have a hangup
about oil.
What cheapest of the cheapest? You mean fast food? I *like* McDonald's
hamburgers. Besides, using shitty oil in standard grade stuff is one thing.
Using it in a super premium product is different.

--Bryan
Sqwertz
2021-09-09 14:45:00 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
What cheapest of the cheapest? You mean fast food? I *like* McDonald's
hamburgers. Besides, using shitty oil in standard grade stuff is one thing.
Using it in a super premium product is different.
McDonalds hamburgers don't even taste like hamburgers. They're some
sort of proprietary flavor that nobody could, or would want to
duplicate at home.

I got a couple of those fancy new 'artisan' Arch burger
things a few years ago (BOGOF) when they introduced "fresh" beef and
lettuce and tomato and they were true to form - did not taste like
hamburgers.

I don't know how they do it and I couldn't care less.

-sw
Sqwertz
2021-09-12 16:44:30 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Bruce 3.2
On Thu, 9 Sep 2021 01:07:37 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>
Shitty canola oil. Seems like they could afford an extra penny or
two to use decent oil.
Strange how you eat the cheapest of the cheapest but have a hangup
about oil.
What cheapest of the cheapest? You mean fast food? I *like* McDonald's
hamburgers. Besides, using shitty oil in standard grade stuff is one thing.
Using it in a super premium product is different.
The ingredients list Sunflower and/or Safflower oil. *Not* canola
oil. So your rant is misplaced.

What foods have added vegetable oils do you consider "premium" or
"SUPER premium". I'm having trouble trying to think of examples.

Even you will use a shitty oil for home use if the price is right
(as it was for your 55 gallon drum of peanut oil). So how can you
blame manufacturers (or us) when they use it on scale hundreds or
hundreds of thousands of times greater than your piddly savings?
You jumped on it to save $2 or $3. But manufacturers are guilty of
High Crimes Against Food when they save millions of dollars - even
if you *like* their food.

You seem to have a lot of double standards when your high horse
isn't laid up. Look at Tinkerbell - He's a cheap-assed bastard with
some odd food standards/hangups - not unlike you. He sucks at
justifying many of them, but at least he's steadfast for the most
part.

I think I'll fry up some home made Vietnamese eggrolls at halftime.
I use vegetable/soybean oil.

No wait... I gotta do some sauced fried wings using thighs cut into
thirds. Yeah, baby! Also soybean oil....

-sw
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-12 17:52:10 UTC
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Post by Sqwertz
Even you will use a shitty oil for home use if the price is right
(as it was for your 55 gallon drum of peanut oil). So how can you
blame manufacturers (or us) when they use it on scale hundreds or
hundreds of thousands of times greater than your piddly savings?
You jumped on it to save $2 or $3. But manufacturers are guilty of
High Crimes Against Food when they save millions of dollars - even
if you *like* their food.
Show everyone where I posted that I bought a 55 gallon drum of
peanut oil. You can't, because you made that up.

Hey, Sheldon. Look! Steve is blowing out his ass like you. You know
that imitation is the highest form of praise.
Post by Sqwertz
You seem to have a lot of double standards when your high horse
isn't laid up. Look at Tinkerbell - He's a cheap-assed bastard with
some odd food standards/hangups - not unlike you. He sucks at
justifying many of them, but at least he's steadfast for the most
part.
More praise for Sheldon.
I'm not really into cheap things. I'm into paying cheaper prices for the
same thing.
Post by Sqwertz
I think I'll fry up some home made Vietnamese eggrolls at halftime.
I use vegetable/soybean oil.
You can't taste it because you put so much weird, stinking shit in most
of the stuff you make.
Post by Sqwertz
No wait... I gotta do some sauced fried wings using thighs cut into
thirds. Yeah, baby! Also soybean oil....
I guess you're lucky that you can't taste rancid fats.
Post by Sqwertz
-sw
--Bryan
Sqwertz
2021-09-13 04:21:19 UTC
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Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Even you will use a shitty oil for home use if the price is right
(as it was for your 55 gallon drum of peanut oil). So how can you
blame manufacturers (or us) when they use it on scale hundreds or
hundreds of thousands of times greater than your piddly savings?
You jumped on it to save $2 or $3. But manufacturers are guilty of
High Crimes Against Food when they save millions of dollars - even
if you *like* their food.
Show everyone where I posted that I bought a 55 gallon drum of
peanut oil. You can't, because you made that up.
I'm so busted. Yeah, you got me there. But in my defense, I think
everybody except you understood that I was purposely exaggerating.
The point simply being that you bought a lot of it.
Post by Bryan Simmons
Hey, Sheldon. Look! Steve is blowing out his ass like you. You know
that imitation is the highest form of praise.
There's that <whoosh> sound again.

You snipped out the part where I asked what you consider a
"super-premium" food product made out of cooking oil.
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
You seem to have a lot of double standards when your high horse
isn't laid up. Look at Tinkerbell - He's a cheap-assed bastard with
some odd food standards/hangups - not unlike you. He sucks at
justifying many of them, but at least he's steadfast for the most
part.
More praise for Sheldon.
I'm not really into cheap things. I'm into paying cheaper prices for the
same thing.
Post by Sqwertz
I think I'll fry up some home made Vietnamese eggrolls at halftime.
I use vegetable/soybean oil.
You can't taste it because you put so much weird, stinking shit in most
of the stuff you make.
....
Post by Bryan Simmons
I guess you're lucky that you can't taste rancid fats.
But..., but... it's what used to fry up your favorite Corporate
French fries. So you *LIKE* rancid French fries? Or it's only
rancid oil when *I* use it?

This double standard bullshit is making a narcissistic asshole out
of you.

-sw
Bruce 3.2
2021-09-13 05:23:33 UTC
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Post by Sqwertz
Post by Bryan Simmons
I guess you're lucky that you can't taste rancid fats.
But..., but... it's what used to fry up your favorite Corporate
French fries. So you *LIKE* rancid French fries? Or it's only
rancid oil when *I* use it?
This double standard bullshit is making a narcissistic asshole out
of you.
YOU're always going on about what YOU cook and what YOU think and who
YOU think should be ignored and how fantastic YOU are and how YOU know
everything better and what terrible ailment YOU have this time . An
endless list of me me me me me me me me.

And then you call someone else a narcissist. lol
Sheldon Martin
2021-09-13 11:44:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sqwertz
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Even you will use a shitty oil for home use if the price is right
(as it was for your 55 gallon drum of peanut oil). So how can you
blame manufacturers (or us) when they use it on scale hundreds or
hundreds of thousands of times greater than your piddly savings?
You jumped on it to save $2 or $3. But manufacturers are guilty of
High Crimes Against Food when they save millions of dollars - even
if you *like* their food.
Show everyone where I posted that I bought a 55 gallon drum of
peanut oil. You can't, because you made that up.
I'm so busted. Yeah, you got me there. But in my defense, I think
everybody except you understood that I was purposely exaggerating.
The point simply being that you bought a lot of it.
Post by Bryan Simmons
Hey, Sheldon. Look! Steve is blowing out his ass like you. You know
that imitation is the highest form of praise.
There's that <whoosh> sound again.
You snipped out the part where I asked what you consider a
"super-premium" food product made out of cooking oil.
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
You seem to have a lot of double standards when your high horse
isn't laid up. Look at Tinkerbell - He's a cheap-assed bastard with
some odd food standards/hangups - not unlike you. He sucks at
justifying many of them, but at least he's steadfast for the most
part.
More praise for Sheldon.
I'm not really into cheap things. I'm into paying cheaper prices for the
same thing.
Post by Sqwertz
I think I'll fry up some home made Vietnamese eggrolls at halftime.
I use vegetable/soybean oil.
You can't taste it because you put so much weird, stinking shit in most
of the stuff you make.
....
Post by Bryan Simmons
I guess you're lucky that you can't taste rancid fats.
But..., but... it's what used to fry up your favorite Corporate
French fries. So you *LIKE* rancid French fries? Or it's only
rancid oil when *I* use it?
This double standard bullshit is making a narcissistic asshole out
of you.
-sw
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes... they eat those prefried extruded frozen shoestring
potatoes refried in rancid motor oil at fast food joints served by
unwashed toilet hands.
Bruce 3.2
2021-09-13 11:52:09 UTC
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Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes. Aren't
they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer? You don't
have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-09-13 13:02:58 UTC
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Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes. Aren't
they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer? You don't
have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. Many restaurants serve fries made from
real potatoes. Some of the fries still have the peel on them. I once spent
a pleasant wait for my meal watching a guy in an open kitchen cutting up
potatoes for fries. I love work. I could watch it all day long.

Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are easier
to deal with. I don't know where he gets "extruded fries". He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.

<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>

Cindy Hamilton
Gary
2021-09-13 14:24:00 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes. Aren't
they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer? You don't
have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. Many restaurants serve fries made from
real potatoes. Some of the fries still have the peel on them. I once spent
a pleasant wait for my meal watching a guy in an open kitchen cutting up
potatoes for fries. I love work. I could watch it all day long.
Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are easier
to deal with. I don't know where he gets "extruded fries". He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
I like all variations of fries. Always tasty with plenty of pepper.
Salt too, of course. No ketchup for me.
cshenk
2021-09-19 17:05:45 UTC
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Post by Gary
Post by Cindy Hamilton
On Mon, 13 Sep 2021 07:44:03 -0400, Sheldon Martin
Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that
most people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten
french fried potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes.
Aren't they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer?
You don't have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. Many restaurants serve fries
made from real potatoes. Some of the fries still have the peel on
them. I once spent a pleasant wait for my meal watching a guy in an
open kitchen cutting up potatoes for fries. I love work. I could
watch it all day long.
Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are
easier to deal with. I don't know where he gets "extruded fries".
He pulls some of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Post by Gary
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Cindy Hamilton
I like all variations of fries. Always tasty with plenty of pepper.
Salt too, of course. No ketchup for me.
Here we have 3 types of fries.

Most often: about every 3 weeks, Mommie fries, unpeeled raw potato in
bacon or other fat (Duck is perfect!) and/or olive oil. Lots of spices
of the moment. Cast iron pan on stove.

Next often: every 2 months or so, Daddie fries, usually peeled but not
always, raw potatoes, rolled in flour, may also get eggwash and more
flour (depends on his mood that day). Deep fried in oil. Cannola oil
usually.

Rare: 2-3 times a year, frozen tater tots or crinkle cut done in a
small air fryer. Often mixed with some Totinos pizza bites or similar
air-fryer type items. Lightly coated with olive oil so they crisp
nicely.

The Mommie Fries are close to a rustic hash brown but not the shredded
sort. They normally have onion added.
Michael Trew
2021-09-19 19:57:42 UTC
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Post by cshenk
Post by Gary
I like all variations of fries. Always tasty with plenty of pepper.
Salt too, of course. No ketchup for me.
Here we have 3 types of fries.
Most often: about every 3 weeks, Mommie fries, unpeeled raw potato in
bacon or other fat (Duck is perfect!) and/or olive oil. Lots of spices
of the moment. Cast iron pan on stove.
Next often: every 2 months or so, Daddie fries, usually peeled but not
always, raw potatoes, rolled in flour, may also get eggwash and more
flour (depends on his mood that day). Deep fried in oil. Cannola oil
usually.
Rare: 2-3 times a year, frozen tater tots or crinkle cut done in a
small air fryer. Often mixed with some Totinos pizza bites or similar
air-fryer type items. Lightly coated with olive oil so they crisp
nicely.
The Mommie Fries are close to a rustic hash brown but not the shredded
sort. They normally have onion added.
Hmm.. interesting. I suppose I normally make "mommie" fries. Never
peeled, and either pan fried or deep fried. I don't think I've ever egg
washed or done any type of batter on fried potatoes before.
Mike Duffy
2021-09-13 14:31:02 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
I don't know where he gets "extruded fries".
I suppose it is possible to make a starchy paste and push it out through
square holes directly into hot oil, but I have never heard of this
actually being done.

But that would be a disappointment for the majority who prefer the
crunchy end pieces. If you watch, almost everyone saves them for last.

I'm still waiting for someone to replace the square-tesselated cutting
grills with one that produce crunchier fries with Escheresque angels &
demon cross-sections, but that is just because I am an idyllic dreamer.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-09-13 15:05:25 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I don't know where he gets "extruded fries".
I suppose it is possible to make a starchy paste and push it out through
square holes directly into hot oil, but I have never heard of this
actually being done.
But that would be a disappointment for the majority who prefer the
crunchy end pieces. If you watch, almost everyone saves them for last.
I'm still waiting for someone to replace the square-tesselated cutting
grills with one that produce crunchier fries with Escheresque angels &
demon cross-sections, but that is just because I am an idyllic dreamer.
Heh. Mandelbrot fries.

Cindy Hamilton
Ed Pawlowski
2021-09-13 15:26:12 UTC
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Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I don't know where he gets "extruded fries".
I suppose it is possible to make a starchy paste and push it out through
square holes directly into hot oil, but I have never heard of this
actually being done.
Doubt it is possible but if I did invent such a thing I'd make a warped
disc shape and call them Pringles.


GM
2021-09-13 15:46:21 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I don't know where he gets "extruded fries".
I suppose it is possible to make a starchy paste and push it out through
square holes directly into hot oil, but I have never heard of this
actually being done.
Doubt it is possible but if I did invent such a thing I'd make a warped
disc shape and call them Pringles.
http://youtu.be/6k7rN_GHfkw
Is it true that Pringles have never made a cent in profit since introduced in the late
60's...remember reading that somewheres, urban legend or...???
--
GM
Ed Pawlowski
2021-09-13 16:32:49 UTC
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Post by GM
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I don't know where he gets "extruded fries".
I suppose it is possible to make a starchy paste and push it out through
square holes directly into hot oil, but I have never heard of this
actually being done.
Doubt it is possible but if I did invent such a thing I'd make a warped
disc shape and call them Pringles.
http://youtu.be/6k7rN_GHfkw
Is it true that Pringles have never made a cent in profit since introduced in the late
60's...remember reading that somewheres, urban legend or...???
Could be. Sometimes start-up don't do well but they sell to someone
that has good supply chain for distribution. The company was P & G at
one point and now Kellogg. I was going to buy the company but Kellogg
outbid me at $2.7 bullion.
odlayo
2021-09-13 22:48:36 UTC
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Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I don't know where he gets "extruded fries".
I suppose it is possible to make a starchy paste and push it out through
square holes directly into hot oil, but I have never heard of this
actually being done.
I used to go to a pretty good old-school BBQ house that specialized in spare ribs cooked over real wood. The fries included with all orders were extruded (and not very good). I think the machine was fed with some sort of rehydrated dry potatoes. That might be the only time I (knowingly) encountered extruded fries.

I guess you could think of tater tots as unusually short and wide extruded French fries.
Post by Mike Duffy
But that would be a disappointment for the majority who prefer the
crunchy end pieces. If you watch, almost everyone saves them for last.
I'm still waiting for someone to replace the square-tesselated cutting
grills with one that produce crunchier fries with Escheresque angels &
demon cross-sections, but that is just because I am an idyllic dreamer.
Isn't that pretty much the reason crinkle-cut and waffle/snowshoe fries were created? But I like your idea better.
Michael Trew
2021-09-14 04:25:24 UTC
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Post by odlayo
Post by Mike Duffy
Post by Cindy Hamilton
I don't know where he gets "extruded fries".
I suppose it is possible to make a starchy paste and push it out through
square holes directly into hot oil, but I have never heard of this
actually being done.
I used to go to a pretty good old-school BBQ house that specialized in spare ribs cooked over real wood. The fries included with all orders were extruded (and not very good). I think the machine was fed with some sort of rehydrated dry potatoes. That might be the only time I (knowingly) encountered extruded fries.
I guess you could think of tater tots as unusually short and wide extruded French fries.
I feel like I've had them before. I never knew what they were until
reading this thread. The texture is as you would expect... kind of
reminds you of thick mashed potatoes, that are formed into "Fries" then
deep fried. Kind of crisp mashed potato sticks. They weren't horrible,
but no where near as good as real cut fried potatoes.
Post by odlayo
Post by Mike Duffy
But that would be a disappointment for the majority who prefer the
crunchy end pieces. If you watch, almost everyone saves them for last.
I'm still waiting for someone to replace the square-tesselated cutting
grills with one that produce crunchier fries with Escheresque angels&
demon cross-sections, but that is just because I am an idyllic dreamer.
Isn't that pretty much the reason crinkle-cut and waffle/snowshoe fries were created? But I like your idea better.
I'm always disappointed with restaurants that serve crinkle cut fries.
They are always frozen, and the texture is never right. I tried quite a
few different local fish fries last lent season, and the ones that used
crinkle cut fries, instead of homemade.. typically their fish wasn't as
good either.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-15 11:37:54 UTC
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Post by Michael Trew
I'm always disappointed with restaurants that serve crinkle cut fries.
They are always frozen, and the texture is never right. I tried quite a
few different local fish fries last lent season, and the ones that used
crinkle cut fries, instead of homemade.. typically their fish wasn't as
good either.
Crinkle cut fries are the worst, and fried fish is best made at home.
Buy frozen fish and that it. Coat it with this:
https://www.walmart.com/grocery/ip/Andy-s-Fish-Breading-Red-10-Ounces/16935615
let it sit for several minutes and shake it with breading again. Let it
sit 10 more minutes and repeat. Deep fry it in decent quality, high
monounsaturate oil. Serve with halved lemons or limes.

--Bryan
Ed Pawlowski
2021-09-13 15:18:46 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes. Aren't
they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer? You don't
have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. Many restaurants serve fries made from
real potatoes. Some of the fries still have the peel on them. I once spent
a pleasant wait for my meal watching a guy in an open kitchen cutting up
potatoes for fries. I love work. I could watch it all day long.
Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are easier
to deal with. I don't know where he gets "extruded fries". He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.

Good chance the oil is from Jiffy Lube, but they sure taste good.
bruce bowser
2021-09-13 15:20:51 UTC
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Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes. Aren't
they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer? You don't
have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. Many restaurants serve fries made from
real potatoes. Some of the fries still have the peel on them. I once spent
a pleasant wait for my meal watching a guy in an open kitchen cutting up
potatoes for fries. I love work. I could watch it all day long.
Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are easier
to deal with. I don't know where he gets "extruded fries". He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Good chance the oil is from Jiffy Lube, but they sure taste good.
Their is cheaper than Crisco?
Ed Pawlowski
2021-09-13 16:18:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes. Aren't
they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer? You don't
have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. Many restaurants serve fries made from
real potatoes. Some of the fries still have the peel on them. I once spent
a pleasant wait for my meal watching a guy in an open kitchen cutting up
potatoes for fries. I love work. I could watch it all day long.
Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are easier
to deal with. I don't know where he gets "extruded fries". He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Good chance the oil is from Jiffy Lube, but they sure taste good.
Their is cheaper than Crisco?
Used motor oil? Very cheap.
Gary
2021-09-14 12:41:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.

Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Michael Trew
2021-09-15 03:35:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Yes, those are good fries... but they tend to be expensive. Hence,
that's how I make them at home, but just with whatever potatoes I have
on hand.

We typically call them carnival or fair fries, since that's the only
place to get them - we aren't near the coast.
Ophelia
2021-09-15 09:37:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Yes, those are good fries... but they tend to be expensive.  Hence,
that's how I make them at home, but just with whatever potatoes I have
on hand.
We typically call them carnival or fair fries, since that's the only
place to get them - we aren't near the coast.
===

Yes, I make them around once a week but we call them chips:)) (and
no, they are not like your 'chips':))
Michael Trew
2021-09-15 17:39:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Yes, those are good fries... but they tend to be expensive. Hence,
that's how I make them at home, but just with whatever potatoes I have
on hand.
We typically call them carnival or fair fries, since that's the only
place to get them - we aren't near the coast.
===
Yes, I make them around once a week but we call them chips:)) (and no,
they are not like your 'chips':))
Yes, I know. I had "fish and chips" once, and learned that "chips" were
"fries". :)
Ophelia
2021-09-16 15:46:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Yes, those are good fries... but they tend to be expensive.  Hence,
that's how I make them at home, but just with whatever potatoes I have
on hand.
We typically call them carnival or fair fries, since that's the only
place to get them - we aren't near the coast.
===
Yes, I make them around once a week but we call them chips:)) (and no,
they are not like your 'chips':))
Yes, I know.  I had "fish and chips" once, and learned that "chips" were
"fries".  :)
====

Did you enjoy your fish and chips? I hope you got some good ones and
enjoyed them:))
Michael Trew
2021-09-16 17:56:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Yes, those are good fries... but they tend to be expensive. Hence,
that's how I make them at home, but just with whatever potatoes I have
on hand.
We typically call them carnival or fair fries, since that's the only
place to get them - we aren't near the coast.
===
Yes, I make them around once a week but we call them chips:)) (and no,
they are not like your 'chips':))
Yes, I know. I had "fish and chips" once, and learned that "chips"
were "fries". :)
====
Did you enjoy your fish and chips? I hope you got some good ones and
enjoyed them:))
Yes, it was good. Probably not as good as something authentic from over
seas, but I much enjoyed the malt vinegar on the "chips". I've been
using it regularly on "fries" since.
Ophelia
2021-09-17 08:48:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Yes, those are good fries... but they tend to be expensive.  Hence,
that's how I make them at home, but just with whatever potatoes I have
on hand.
We typically call them carnival or fair fries, since that's the only
place to get them - we aren't near the coast.
===
Yes, I make them around once a week but we call them chips:)) (and no,
they are not like your 'chips':))
Yes, I know.  I had "fish and chips" once, and learned that "chips"
were "fries".  :)
====
Did you enjoy your fish and chips? I hope you got some good ones and
enjoyed them:))
Yes, it was good.  Probably not as good as something authentic from over
seas, but I much enjoyed the malt vinegar on the "chips".  I've been
using it regularly on "fries" since.
====

I always have malt vinegar on my chips:)) They don't tast right
without it :)))
Ophelia
2021-09-17 13:14:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
Post by Gary
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They cut
the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Yes, those are good fries... but they tend to be expensive. Hence,
that's how I make them at home, but just with whatever potatoes I have
on hand.
We typically call them carnival or fair fries, since that's the only
place to get them - we aren't near the coast.
===
Yes, I make them around once a week but we call them chips:)) (and no,
they are not like your 'chips':))
Yes, I know. I had "fish and chips" once, and learned that "chips"
were "fries". :)
====
Did you enjoy your fish and chips? I hope you got some good ones and
enjoyed them:))
Yes, it was good. Probably not as good as something authentic from over
seas, but I much enjoyed the malt vinegar on the "chips". I've been
using it regularly on "fries" since.
====
I always have malt vinegar on my chips:)) They don't tast right
without it :)))
I always have malt vinegar on my tits:)) They don't taste right
without it :)))

lol
cshenk
2021-09-19 17:08:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Ed Pawlowski
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They
cut the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Smile, 'Daddy fries' is what we call them.
Gary
2021-09-21 11:10:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by cshenk
Post by Gary
Post by Ed Pawlowski
The French Fry truck is always a big hit at fairs and such. They
cut the russet potatoes and fry them immediately.
Those are the very best, imo. Sold here as "Boardwalk Fries."
Your area might call them different but they sound the same.
Cut unpeeled russets and immediately fried. Served in large cups. At
beach festivals here, I always buy one. Can't resist those.
Smile, 'Daddy fries' is what we call them.
Not quite. You just said your "Daddy fries" are floured with or without
eggwash and more flour.

The Boardwalk fries are just potatoes cooked in oil. I've watched them
make them while waiting in line to buy some.
dsi1
2021-09-13 15:50:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes. Aren't
they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer? You don't
have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. Many restaurants serve fries made from
real potatoes. Some of the fries still have the peel on them. I once spent
a pleasant wait for my meal watching a guy in an open kitchen cutting up
potatoes for fries. I love work. I could watch it all day long.
Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are easier
to deal with. I don't know where he gets "extruded fries". He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
Extruded french fries do exist. I have had them. They are pretty easy to spot by their rough surface. My guess is that it's made from wastage from french fry manufacturing.
GM
2021-09-13 15:55:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by Sheldon Martin
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
I'm assuming you mean "French fries" made from real potatoes. Aren't
they really easy to make at home if you have a deep fryer? You don't
have to make them into McDonalds style sticks either.
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. Many restaurants serve fries made from
real potatoes. Some of the fries still have the peel on them. I once spent
a pleasant wait for my meal watching a guy in an open kitchen cutting up
potatoes for fries. I love work. I could watch it all day long.
Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are easier
to deal with. I don't know where he gets "extruded fries". He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
Extruded french fries do exist. I have had them. They are pretty easy to spot by their rough surface. My guess is that it's made from wastage from french fry manufacturing.
HEY, do ya think they might even be made from POTATOES...!!!???

IMWTK...!!!

😎
--
GM
Michael Trew
2021-09-13 16:14:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Admittedly, an awful lot of restaurants use frozen fries, which are easier
to deal with.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
That's very interesting. I'd like to know why McDonald's fries never
decompose. They literally look the same if you leave one under your car
seat for 2 years. Not that I'm advising this. Ants on the sidewalk
walk right around pieces of McDonald's fries as if they were rocks.
i***@webtv.net
2021-09-13 19:05:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
In all my years munching on fries from sit down type to fast food restaurants, I've
never ever, ever, ever, ever, eaten or even seen an extruded fry. Maybe that's what
they served in the navy and he thinks that's what all restaurants serve as well.
Bruce 3.2
2021-09-13 19:17:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
Post by Sheldon Martin
I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes...
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-2015-1>
Cindy Hamilton
In all my years munching on fries from sit down type to fast food restaurants, I've
never ever, ever, ever, ever, eaten or even seen an extruded fry. Maybe that's what
they served in the navy and he thinks that's what all restaurants serve as well.
Even crappy frozen supermarket fries have the occasional fry with a
dark spot, from where the original potato had it. If it had all been
mashed and extruded, that wouldn't be so visible, if at all.
i***@webtv.net
2021-09-13 19:44:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by i***@webtv.net
In all my years munching on fries from sit down type to fast food restaurants, I've
never ever, ever, ever, ever, eaten or even seen an extruded fry. Maybe that's what
they served in the navy and he thinks that's what all restaurants serve as well.
Even crappy frozen supermarket fries have the occasional fry with a
dark spot, from where the original potato had it. If it had all been
mashed and extruded, that wouldn't be so visible, if at all.
True.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-13 20:16:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by i***@webtv.net
In all my years munching on fries from sit down type to fast food restaurants, I've
never ever, ever, ever, ever, eaten or even seen an extruded fry. Maybe that's what
they served in the navy and he thinks that's what all restaurants serve as well.
Even crappy frozen supermarket fries have the occasional fry with a
dark spot, from where the original potato had it. If it had all been
mashed and extruded, that wouldn't be so visible, if at all.
True.
Sheldon just makes stuff up.

--Bryan
Bruce 3.2
2021-09-13 20:30:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 13 Sep 2021 13:16:32 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by i***@webtv.net
In all my years munching on fries from sit down type to fast food restaurants, I've
never ever, ever, ever, ever, eaten or even seen an extruded fry. Maybe that's what
they served in the navy and he thinks that's what all restaurants serve as well.
Even crappy frozen supermarket fries have the occasional fry with a
dark spot, from where the original potato had it. If it had all been
mashed and extruded, that wouldn't be so visible, if at all.
True.
Sheldon just makes stuff up.
I think extrusion's only used for potato patties, potato croquettes
etc. Things were the original shape/length is in the way.
Michael Trew
2021-09-14 04:27:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.2
Post by i***@webtv.net
In all my years munching on fries from sit down type to fast food restaurants, I've
never ever, ever, ever, ever, eaten or even seen an extruded fry. Maybe that's what
they served in the navy and he thinks that's what all restaurants serve as well.
Even crappy frozen supermarket fries have the occasional fry with a
dark spot, from where the original potato had it. If it had all been
mashed and extruded, that wouldn't be so visible, if at all.
True.
I've had them once. As I posted above, they reminded me of deep fried
sticks of mashed potatoes. The texture was odd and soft.
cshenk
2021-09-19 17:26:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
On Mon, 13 Sep 2021 07:44:03 -0400, Sheldon Martin
Post by Sheldon Martin
I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french
fried potatoes...
Sheldon is full of shit, as usual. He pulls some
of his information right out of his ass.
<https://www.businessinsider.com.au/how-mcdonalds-fries-are-made-201
5-1>
Cindy Hamilton
In all my years munching on fries from sit down type to fast food
restaurants, I've never ever, ever, ever, ever, eaten or even seen an
extruded fry. Maybe that's what they served in the navy and he
thinks that's what all restaurants serve as well.
Nope, not in the Navy. Not in his time either. The Navy gets some
stuff that's quick to make and stores well but he'd have had minimal
'reefer' (freezer) space, so would have been bagged potatoes. Lots and
lots of bagged potatoes. Probably fair amount of dehydrated too.
Bruce 3.2
2021-09-19 20:47:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by i***@webtv.net
In all my years munching on fries from sit down type to fast food
restaurants, I've never ever, ever, ever, ever, eaten or even seen an
extruded fry. Maybe that's what they served in the navy and he
thinks that's what all restaurants serve as well.
Nope, not in the Navy. Not in his time either. The Navy gets some
stuff that's quick to make and stores well but he'd have had minimal
'reefer' (freezer) space, so would have been bagged potatoes. Lots and
lots of bagged potatoes. Probably fair amount of dehydrated too.
I'm sorry, you are replying to a SIX DAY (6) OLD d.e.a.d. subject. If you can't
keep up and join in within 24-36 hours after a post has been made, don't
bother to drag it up again and reply as if we're wondering why you haven't
contributed.
Are you after Sergeant Jill's job or something? It's Jill's job to
warn us when someone replies to an old topic, and it's not even that
old.
Michael Trew
2021-09-13 16:11:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
Post by Sqwertz
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Even you will use a shitty oil for home use if the price is right
(as it was for your 55 gallon drum of peanut oil). So how can you
blame manufacturers (or us) when they use it on scale hundreds or
hundreds of thousands of times greater than your piddly savings?
You jumped on it to save $2 or $3. But manufacturers are guilty of
High Crimes Against Food when they save millions of dollars - even
if you *like* their food.
Show everyone where I posted that I bought a 55 gallon drum of
peanut oil. You can't, because you made that up.
I'm so busted. Yeah, you got me there. But in my defense, I think
everybody except you understood that I was purposely exaggerating.
The point simply being that you bought a lot of it.
Post by Bryan Simmons
Hey, Sheldon. Look! Steve is blowing out his ass like you. You know
that imitation is the highest form of praise.
There's that<whoosh> sound again.
You snipped out the part where I asked what you consider a
"super-premium" food product made out of cooking oil.
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
You seem to have a lot of double standards when your high horse
isn't laid up. Look at Tinkerbell - He's a cheap-assed bastard with
some odd food standards/hangups - not unlike you. He sucks at
justifying many of them, but at least he's steadfast for the most
part.
More praise for Sheldon.
I'm not really into cheap things. I'm into paying cheaper prices for the
same thing.
Post by Sqwertz
I think I'll fry up some home made Vietnamese eggrolls at halftime.
I use vegetable/soybean oil.
You can't taste it because you put so much weird, stinking shit in most
of the stuff you make.
....
Post by Bryan Simmons
I guess you're lucky that you can't taste rancid fats.
But..., but... it's what used to fry up your favorite Corporate
French fries. So you *LIKE* rancid French fries? Or it's only
rancid oil when *I* use it?
This double standard bullshit is making a narcissistic asshole out
of you.
-sw
Since my name was brought into this discussion I'll say that most
people under 60 years old in the US have never eaten french fried
potatoes... they eat those prefried extruded frozen shoestring
potatoes refried in rancid motor oil at fast food joints served by
unwashed toilet hands.
You are proving Bryan's point here. I wash, hand chop, and deep fry
idaho potatoes at least 3 times per month, maybe more. ..Or do you not
believe me unless I go post pictures of it? I don't see why people buy
bags of frozen fries for a premium, that makes no sense.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-09-13 16:51:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You are proving Bryan's point here. I wash, hand chop, and deep fry
idaho potatoes at least 3 times per month, maybe more. ..Or do you not
believe me unless I go post pictures of it? I don't see why people buy
bags of frozen fries for a premium, that makes no sense.
Convenience.

I occasionally buy a frozen bag of sweet potato fries. They're
there in the freezer until I'm ready for them; they don't go bad
(in any reasonable time frame). Same thing with Tater Tots,
which my husband likes (he won't eat sweet potatoes, but
I'll eat tots). Grab a few out of the bag and bake them in a ripping
hot oven.

Plus, my free time is worth more than the minuscule amount of money
that frozen potatoes cost.

In the last 10 years I think I've discarded more white potatoes
than I've cooked. I buy a bag, cook a few, and the next thing
I know they've got 3-foot-long sprouts on them.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2021-09-14 04:30:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Cindy Hamilton
You are proving Bryan's point here. I wash, hand chop, and deep fry
idaho potatoes at least 3 times per month, maybe more. ..Or do you not
believe me unless I go post pictures of it? I don't see why people buy
bags of frozen fries for a premium, that makes no sense.
Convenience.
I occasionally buy a frozen bag of sweet potato fries. They're
there in the freezer until I'm ready for them; they don't go bad
(in any reasonable time frame). Same thing with Tater Tots,
which my husband likes (he won't eat sweet potatoes, but
I'll eat tots). Grab a few out of the bag and bake them in a ripping
hot oven.
Plus, my free time is worth more than the minuscule amount of money
that frozen potatoes cost.
In the last 10 years I think I've discarded more white potatoes
than I've cooked. I buy a bag, cook a few, and the next thing
I know they've got 3-foot-long sprouts on them.
Cindy Hamilton
Yes, I have bought bags of sweet potato fries, I will admit. Not often,
but I don't fry them nearly often enough to buy a sack of sweet
potatoes. I don't buy or make tater tots, although I don't mind them.

I very rarely, if ever, discard a potato. If they are getting old, I
will plan a dish around more potatoes, or bake them in the oven while
something else is cooking, then store them in the fridge. They are nice
chopped and fast-fried with eggs the next morning.

Unless a potato is totally rotten, I just cut the sprouts off on the
occasions they grow, and then use the potato. Is there any reason not
to if it's just a bit soft? Does it harm texture/taste? If so, it's
not enough for me to have noticed.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-13 19:52:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Even you will use a shitty oil for home use if the price is right
(as it was for your 55 gallon drum of peanut oil). So how can you
blame manufacturers (or us) when they use it on scale hundreds or
hundreds of thousands of times greater than your piddly savings?
You jumped on it to save $2 or $3. But manufacturers are guilty of
High Crimes Against Food when they save millions of dollars - even
if you *like* their food.
Show everyone where I posted that I bought a 55 gallon drum of
peanut oil. You can't, because you made that up.
I'm so busted. Yeah, you got me there. But in my defense, I think
everybody except you understood that I was purposely exaggerating.
The point simply being that you bought a lot of it.
Post by Bryan Simmons
Hey, Sheldon. Look! Steve is blowing out his ass like you. You know
that imitation is the highest form of praise.
There's that <whoosh> sound again.
You snipped out the part where I asked what you consider a
"super-premium" food product made out of cooking oil.
Post by Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
You seem to have a lot of double standards when your high horse
isn't laid up. Look at Tinkerbell - He's a cheap-assed bastard with
some odd food standards/hangups - not unlike you. He sucks at
justifying many of them, but at least he's steadfast for the most
part.
More praise for Sheldon.
I'm not really into cheap things. I'm into paying cheaper prices for the
same thing.
Post by Sqwertz
I think I'll fry up some home made Vietnamese eggrolls at halftime.
I use vegetable/soybean oil.
You can't taste it because you put so much weird, stinking shit in most
of the stuff you make.
....
Post by Bryan Simmons
I guess you're lucky that you can't taste rancid fats.
But..., but... it's what used to fry up your favorite Corporate
French fries. So you *LIKE* rancid French fries? Or it's only
rancid oil when *I* use it?
This double standard bullshit is making a narcissistic asshole out
of you.
Some of hold our own food prep to higher standards than fast food,
and some of us buy shitty canned nacho sauce.
https://www.walmart.com/grocery/ip/Ricos-Gourmet-Nacho-Cheddar-Cheese-Sauce-15-0-OZ/10452386
-sw
--Bryan
Ophelia
2021-09-09 14:48:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.2
On Thu, 9 Sep 2021 01:07:37 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>
Shitty canola oil. Seems like they could afford an extra penny or
two to use decent oil.
Strange how you eat the cheapest of the cheapest but have a hangup
about oil.
Flying foxes have been observed engaging in oral sex. Indian flying fox males
will lick a female's vulva both before and after copulation, with the length of pre-copulation
cunnilingus positively correlated with length of copulation. The fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx,
has been observed to engage in fellatio during mating. Pairs spend more time copulating if
the female licks the male than if she does not. Male Livingstone's fruit bats have been observed
engaging in homosexual fellatio, although it is unknown if this is an example of sexual behavior
or social grooming. Bonin flying foxes also engage in homosexual fellatio, but the behavior has
been observed independently of social grooming
Ophelia
2021-09-10 13:07:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ophelia
Post by Bruce 3.2
On Thu, 9 Sep 2021 01:07:37 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>
Shitty canola oil. Seems like they could afford an extra penny or
two to use decent oil.
Strange how you eat the cheapest of the cheapest but have a hangup
about oil.
Flying foxes have been observed engaging in oral sex. Indian flying fox males
will lick a female's vulva both before and after copulation, with the length of pre-copulation
cunnilingus positively correlated with length of copulation. The fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx,
has been observed to engage in fellatio during mating. Pairs spend more time copulating if
the female licks the male than if she does not. Male Livingstone's fruit bats have been observed
engaging in homosexual fellatio, although it is unknown if this is an example of sexual behavior
or social grooming. Bonin flying foxes also engage in homosexual fellatio, but the behavior has
been observed independently of social grooming
NOT ME!
odlayo
2021-09-09 15:13:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Shitty canola oil. Seems like they could afford an extra penny or
two to use decent oil.
What are you talking about?

"The 2021 One Chip Challenge chips contains Blue Corn, Sunflower and/or Safflower Oil, Carolina Reaper Pepper, Scorpion Chile Pepper, and Sea Salt."
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-09 16:15:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by odlayo
Shitty canola oil. Seems like they could afford an extra penny or
two to use decent oil.
What are you talking about?
"The 2021 One Chip Challenge chips contains Blue Corn, Sunflower and/or Safflower Oil, Carolina Reaper Pepper, Scorpion Chile Pepper, and Sea Salt."
Enter *paqui chips ingredients* into Google and you get an ingredient
list that has canola.

--Bryan
odlayo
2021-09-09 16:40:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
Enter *paqui chips ingredients* into Google and you get an ingredient
list that has canola.
Enter "paqui one chip challenge [the product we're talking about] ingredients" and you get the ingredient list I quoted above. If you look at the Amazon listing, you can read the ingredient list on the package itself. It's the same as I posted. No canola.

https://www.amazon.com/2020-Paqui-Chip-Challenge-0-21oz/dp/B0896Y8PLN
odlayo
2021-09-09 15:09:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients.... <yawn>
Guisado looks good, but I'm more interested in the chip. How was it? I'm working my way through some bags of Krakatoa Black Magic potato chips, made with ghost, habanero, cayenne, and chee-POTE-lay chiles. They're quite delicious but seriously hot (38,700 Scovilles according to the package). I suspect the Paqui 2021 One Chip Challenge chip is significantly hotter.
Michael Trew
2021-09-10 03:32:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by odlayo
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken stock,
chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients....<yawn>
Guisado looks good, but I'm more interested in the chip. How was it? I'm working my way through some bags of Krakatoa Black Magic potato chips, made with ghost, habanero, cayenne, and chee-POTE-lay chiles. They're quite delicious but seriously hot (38,700 Scovilles according to the package). I suspect the Paqui 2021 One Chip Challenge chip is significantly hotter.
I've never understood the point of food that is so spicy that it is
physically painful to eat. Yes, I like spicy, but when it's crossed a
border that it's actually painful to consume (like hot wing challenges),
what is the point? Just to say you can? Ouch.
cshenk
2021-09-19 16:51:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by odlayo
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken
stock, chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's
Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients....<yawn>
Guisado looks good, but I'm more interested in the chip. How was
it? I'm working my way through some bags of Krakatoa Black Magic
potato chips, made with ghost, habanero, cayenne, and chee-POTE-lay
chiles. They're quite delicious but seriously hot (38,700 Scovilles
according to the package). I suspect the Paqui 2021 One Chip
Challenge chip is significantly hotter.
I've never understood the point of food that is so spicy that it is
physically painful to eat. Yes, I like spicy, but when it's crossed
a border that it's actually painful to consume (like hot wing
challenges), what is the point? Just to say you can? Ouch.
Nor have I. I DO like kImchee, full Korean level in Korea. When I make
it though, it's the lighter 'crispy' Japan one. It still has a lot of
heat, but is not over-powering.

'Hot wings'? Blech. Don't waste my time if beyond medium heat.
Sheldon Martin
2021-09-19 18:15:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 19 Sep 2021 11:51:08 -0500, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Post by Michael Trew
Post by odlayo
Post by Sqwertz
Pork butt, 3 kinds of roasted chiles, onions, garlic, chicken
stock, chile pepper, etc... and some fresh slivered Sqwertz's
Piss Peppers.
https://i.postimg.cc/Kjj6RqzX/Green-Chile-Stew.jpg
And an $8.50 tortilla chip (not plural). Go ahead Brucella - look
up the ingredients....<yawn>
Guisado looks good, but I'm more interested in the chip. How was
it? I'm working my way through some bags of Krakatoa Black Magic
potato chips, made with ghost, habanero, cayenne, and chee-POTE-lay
chiles. They're quite delicious but seriously hot (38,700 Scovilles
according to the package). I suspect the Paqui 2021 One Chip
Challenge chip is significantly hotter.
I've never understood the point of food that is so spicy that it is
physically painful to eat. Yes, I like spicy, but when it's crossed
a border that it's actually painful to consume (like hot wing
challenges), what is the point? Just to say you can? Ouch.
Nor have I. I DO like kImchee, full Korean level in Korea. When I make
it though, it's the lighter 'crispy' Japan one. It still has a lot of
heat, but is not over-powering.
'Hot wings'? Blech. Don't waste my time if beyond medium heat.
WTF makes you think anyone is going to read five more posts in a row
by you in the same thread... I never read the second post by anyone in
the same thread. Just makes me think someone hasn't a clue WTF
they're talking about... and with you I know I'm correct, I rarely
read your first post past the first comma.
Michael Trew
2021-09-19 19:55:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sheldon Martin
On Sun, 19 Sep 2021 11:51:08 -0500, "cshenk"
Post by cshenk
Nor have I. I DO like kImchee, full Korean level in Korea. When I make
it though, it's the lighter 'crispy' Japan one. It still has a lot of
heat, but is not over-powering.
'Hot wings'? Blech. Don't waste my time if beyond medium heat.
WTF makes you think anyone is going to read five more posts in a row
by you in the same thread... I never read the second post by anyone in
the same thread. Just makes me think someone hasn't a clue WTF
they're talking about... and with you I know I'm correct, I rarely
read your first post past the first comma.
That's contrary to what you've posted before. You prior said that you
won't read them if there are more than 3 posts by the same person in the
same thread. It takes but mere seconds to read through most posts,
don't be lazy.

Did it never register to you that perhaps someone is replying to other
side discussions or other parts of the topic directed at a specific
person? Clearly not.
Gary
2021-09-21 11:09:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by cshenk
'Hot wings'? Blech. Don't waste my time if beyond medium heat.
Supposedly the original recipe from X-restaurant in NY,
"Frank's Hot Sauce" mixed with melted butter is a good medium heat recipe.

I don't do "wings," I do whole chicken cut into smaller pieces or even
better - whole thighs.

Cook the chicken, coat in the butter/sauce mix and serve with creamy
"Marie's Blue Cheese Dressing" on the side as a dip. Usually sold in
the produce section of a grocery store.
Dave Smith
2021-09-21 14:42:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
'Hot wings'?  Blech. Don't waste my time if beyond medium heat.
Supposedly the original recipe from X-restaurant in NY,
"Frank's Hot Sauce" mixed with melted butter is a good medium heat recipe.
I don't do "wings," I do whole chicken cut into smaller pieces or even
better - whole thighs.
Cook the chicken, coat in the butter/sauce mix and serve with creamy
"Marie's Blue Cheese Dressing" on the side as a dip.  Usually sold in
the produce section of a grocery store.
They originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo and their recipe was
Frank's hot sauce and oleo.
Michael Trew
2021-09-21 16:42:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Gary
Post by cshenk
'Hot wings'? Blech. Don't waste my time if beyond medium heat.
Supposedly the original recipe from X-restaurant in NY,
"Frank's Hot Sauce" mixed with melted butter is a good medium heat recipe.
I don't do "wings," I do whole chicken cut into smaller pieces or even
better - whole thighs.
Cook the chicken, coat in the butter/sauce mix and serve with creamy
"Marie's Blue Cheese Dressing" on the side as a dip. Usually sold in
the produce section of a grocery store.
They originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo and their recipe was
Frank's hot sauce and oleo.
Really? I always thought it was originally real butter.
Dave Smith
2021-09-21 17:23:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
the produce section of a grocery store.
Post by Dave Smith
They originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo and their recipe was
Frank's hot sauce and oleo.
Really?  I always thought it was originally real butter.
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a bar
and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We went to a
lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings and try to get
recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo where he sold a
lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I have made them myself many times
and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
Michael Trew
2021-09-21 17:33:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
the produce section of a grocery store.
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Dave Smith
They originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo and their recipe was
Frank's hot sauce and oleo.
Really? I always thought it was originally real butter.
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a bar
and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We went to a
lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings and try to get
recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo where he sold a
lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I have made them myself many times
and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
I've never bought oleo.. my mother and grandmother did, I couldn't stand
the stuff on toast or in recipes. I only buy stick butter since I moved
into my house. Perhaps oleo will be good in wing sauce, might be
cheaper too. I rarely make buffalo wings, but I'll try it next time.
Dave Smith
2021-09-21 18:51:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a bar
and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We went to a
lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings and try to get
recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo where he sold a
lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I have made them myself many times
and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
I've never bought oleo.. my mother and grandmother did, I couldn't stand
the stuff on toast or in recipes.  I only buy stick butter since I moved
into my house.  Perhaps oleo will be good in wing sauce, might be
cheaper too.  I rarely make buffalo wings, but I'll try it next time.
I agree that margarine is a bad substitute for butter on toasts, and
bread. I use it frequently for cookies and it works fine.
Bruce 3.2
2021-09-21 19:20:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 21 Sep 2021 14:51:46 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Michael Trew
Post by Gary
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a bar
and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We went to a
lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings and try to get
recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo where he sold a
lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I have made them myself many times
and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
I've never bought oleo.. my mother and grandmother did, I couldn't stand
the stuff on toast or in recipes.  I only buy stick butter since I moved
into my house.  Perhaps oleo will be good in wing sauce, might be
cheaper too.  I rarely make buffalo wings, but I'll try it next time.
I agree that margarine is a bad substitute for butter on toasts, and
bread. I use it frequently for cookies and it works fine.
Eew, margarine cookies.
Gary
2021-09-22 12:44:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Trew
I've never bought oleo.. my mother and grandmother did, I couldn't stand
the stuff on toast or in recipes. I only buy stick butter since I moved
into my house. Perhaps oleo will be good in wing sauce, might be
cheaper too. I rarely make buffalo wings, but I'll try it next time.
Use real butter and be happier.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-22 13:14:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Michael Trew
I've never bought oleo.. my mother and grandmother did, I couldn't stand
the stuff on toast or in recipes. I only buy stick butter since I moved
into my house. Perhaps oleo will be good in wing sauce, might be
cheaper too. I rarely make buffalo wings, but I'll try it next time.
Use real butter and be happier.
You should try using Cholula instead of the cheaper stuff. Butter
deserves it.

--Bryan

"I have cooked a lot of wings over the years and they
were much better with margarine than with butter."
-- Dave Smith in rec.food.cooking Sep 21, 2021, 4:58:43 PM
Ed Pawlowski
2021-09-21 18:02:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
the produce section of a grocery store.
Post by Dave Smith
They originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo and their recipe was
Frank's hot sauce and oleo.
Really?  I always thought it was originally real butter.
Nope. Oleo.  Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a bar
and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We went to a
lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings and try to get
recipes.  I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo where he sold a
lot of wings. He insisted on oleo.  I have made them myself many times
and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
Not according to this and the first page of a Google search. They all
show butter

https://parade.com/26655/anchorbarbuffalony/anchor-bars-buffalo-wings-the-original-hot-wing-recipe/

36 chicken wing segments
4 tsp vegetable oil
1 tsp salt
¾ cup flour
8 Tbsp (1 stick) butter
4 tsp cider vinegar
¼ to 1 tsp cayenne pepper, or to taste
⅛ tsp garlic powder
4 to 8 Tbsp hot sauce, or to taste (Frank’s is the brand used in Buffalo)
Celery sticks
Blue cheese dressing
odlayo
2021-09-21 18:37:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Post by Dave Smith
They originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo and their recipe was
Frank's hot sauce and oleo.
Really? I always thought it was originally real butter.
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a bar
and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We went to a
lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings and try to get
recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo where he sold a
lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I have made them myself many times
and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
Not according to this and the first page of a Google search. They all
show butter
https://parade.com/26655/anchorbarbuffalony/anchor-bars-buffalo-wings-the-original-hot-wing-recipe/
I lived in Buffalo in the early 1970s and can't agree wings were a novelty even then. Many owners of Western NY bars and pizzerias certainly took notice (as did your friend) and added this hugely popular item to their menus well before the late 1970s. Wings were fast and easy to prepare and, at the time, cheap. Back then, wings were almost completely a local specialty. You're correct they became widely popular after the late 1970s. This was due in large part to an article by the great Calvin Trillin in The New Yorker in 1980. The next year Craig Claiborne and Pierre Franey published an article and recipe in The New York Times. Wings took off.

Some of the butter/margarine confusion is due to the 1981 NYT recipe. At the time Anchor Bar refused to divulge their secrets. Janice Okun, longtime Buffalo food writer, devised a recipe that closely replicated the famous wings and gave it to Claiborne and Franey. She used butter and Frank's hot sauce. Probably nobody will ever be certain exactly what Teressa Bellissimo used that night in 1964 – Day 1 of the Buffalo Wing era. The principals never spilled the beans as far as I know, but I think the consensus is that Anchor was using margarine early on.
Dave Smith
2021-09-21 20:32:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by odlayo
Post by Gary
Post by Dave Smith
They originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo and their recipe
was Frank's hot sauce and oleo.
Really? I always thought it was originally real butter.
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up
a bar and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time.
We went to a lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try
wings and try to get recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar
in Buffalo where he sold a lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I
have made them myself many times and I tried butter. They are
better with margarine.
Not according to this and the first page of a Google search. They
all show butter
https://parade.com/26655/anchorbarbuffalony/anchor-bars-buffalo-wings-the-original-hot-wing-recipe/
I lived in Buffalo in the early 1970s and can't agree wings were a
novelty even then. Many owners of Western NY bars and pizzerias
certainly took notice (as did your friend) and added this hugely
popular item to their menus well before the late 1970s. Wings were
fast and easy to prepare and, at the time, cheap. Back then, wings
were almost completely a local specialty.
I don't remember seeing them anywhere other than Buffalo. There were
certainly a novelty in St.Catharines where my friend's bar was one of
the first to offer them.
Post by odlayo
You're correct they became
widely popular after the late 1970s. This was due in large part to an
article by the great Calvin Trillin in The New Yorker in 1980. The
next year Craig Claiborne and Pierre Franey published an article and
recipe in The New York Times. Wings took off.
They took off here before that. Within a year of my friend's bar selling
them they were available in just about every bar and restaurant around
here.
Post by odlayo
Some of the butter/margarine confusion is due to the 1981 NYT recipe.
At the time Anchor Bar refused to divulge their secrets. Janice Okun,
longtime Buffalo food writer, devised a recipe that closely
replicated the famous wings and gave it to Claiborne and Franey. She
used butter and Frank's hot sauce. Probably nobody will ever be
certain exactly what Teressa Bellissimo used that night in 1964 – Day
1 of the Buffalo Wing era. The principals never spilled the beans as
far as I know, but I think the consensus is that Anchor was using
margarine early on.
Margarine was the inside information I heard. Personally, I preder them
with margarine.
Dave Smith
2021-09-21 21:58:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at 3:32:57 PM UTC-5, Dave Smith
.
Like I said, I don't doubt this, but is there any contemporaneous
evidence? No offense, but citing "Dave Smith, rec.food.cooking, 2021"
isn't going to cut it with the historians. Is your friend who opened
the bar still around? I'd love to interview him. I'm serious.
Sorry, but he died a few years ago. Holy cow... just checked the
obits... it was 15 years.


You can quote me as saying that I have cooked a lot of wings over the
years and they were much better with margarine than with butter.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-22 10:34:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
On Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at 3:32:57 PM UTC-5, Dave Smith
.
Like I said, I don't doubt this, but is there any contemporaneous
evidence? No offense, but citing "Dave Smith, rec.food.cooking, 2021"
isn't going to cut it with the historians. Is your friend who opened
the bar still around? I'd love to interview him. I'm serious.
Sorry, but he died a few years ago. Holy cow... just checked the
obits... it was 15 years.
You can quote me as saying that I have cooked a lot of wings over the
years and they were much better with margarine than with butter.
And now your cardiologist won't let your sorry ass eat either one.

--Bryan

"I have cooked a lot of wings over the years and they
were much better with margarine than with butter."
-- Dave Smith in rec.food.cooking Sep 21, 2021, 4:58:43 PM
Dave Smith
2021-09-21 20:23:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
Nope. Oleo.  Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a
bar and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We
went to a lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings and
try to get recipes.  I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo
where he sold a lot of wings. He insisted on oleo.  I have made them
myself many times and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
Not according to this and the first page of a Google search.  They all
show butter
https://parade.com/26655/anchorbarbuffalony/anchor-bars-buffalo-wings-the-original-hot-wing-recipe/
36 chicken wing segments
4 tsp vegetable oil
1 tsp salt
¾ cup flour
8 Tbsp (1 stick) butter
4 tsp cider vinegar
¼ to 1 tsp cayenne pepper, or to taste
⅛ tsp garlic powder
4 to 8 Tbsp hot sauce, or to taste (Frank’s is the brand used in Buffalo)
Celery sticks
Blue cheese dressing
This authentic Anchor Bar wing recipe calls for margarine/oleo... not
butter.
http://www.cluckbucket.com/original-anchor-bar-wings


This one calls for margarine... not butter.
https://www.food.com/recipe/anchor-bar-buffalo-wing-sauce-154374

Here is one that claims to have updated the Anchor Bar recipe to butter,
but the original was margarine.
https://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Buffalo-Wings/


and another that says margarine
https://foodgeeks.com/recipes/anchor-bar-hot-wings-4052.html


Remember... if it is on the internet is must be true. We have some cites
that say butter and some that say margarine. I clearly remember that
people in the know in Buffalo on the 70s insisted on margarine.
odlayo
2021-09-21 21:04:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Remember... if it is on the internet is must be true. We have some cites
that say butter and some that say margarine. I clearly remember that
people in the know in Buffalo on the 70s insisted on margarine.
As a former Buffalonian I can't argue otherwise; I've long thought Anchor used margarine. I'm not sure precisely why; I guess I just read it repeated often enough years after Buffalo wings hit the big time. But is there any contemporaneous evidence from before 1980 that supports this? I don't put too much stock in things written decades later. I've actually looked into this question a bit and have come up empty. I wouldn't be too surprised if there were sources I'm unaware of.

Are you familiar with Janice Okun, food writer/editor of the Buffalo (Evening) News for some 40 years? She probably knows more about Buffalo's food and its history than anyone, and the '70s and '80s were probably her peak years. When she shared her copycat recipe with the New York Times (likely in 1980 or '81) she guessed the sauce contained butter. If in the 1970s it was common knowledge that Anchor used margarine, I find it somewhat surprising she wouldn't have known about it. But it's certainly possible.
dsi1
2021-09-22 06:09:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by odlayo
Post by Dave Smith
Remember... if it is on the internet is must be true. We have some cites
that say butter and some that say margarine. I clearly remember that
people in the know in Buffalo on the 70s insisted on margarine.
As a former Buffalonian I can't argue otherwise; I've long thought Anchor used margarine. I'm not sure precisely why; I guess I just read it repeated often enough years after Buffalo wings hit the big time. But is there any contemporaneous evidence from before 1980 that supports this? I don't put too much stock in things written decades later. I've actually looked into this question a bit and have come up empty. I wouldn't be too surprised if there were sources I'm unaware of.
Are you familiar with Janice Okun, food writer/editor of the Buffalo (Evening) News for some 40 years? She probably knows more about Buffalo's food and its history than anyone, and the '70s and '80s were probably her peak years. When she shared her copycat recipe with the New York Times (likely in 1980 or '81) she guessed the sauce contained butter. If in the 1970s it was common knowledge that Anchor used margarine, I find it somewhat surprising she wouldn't have known about it. But it's certainly possible.
Back when I was a kid - and most of my life, margarine was considered to be a healthy spread and butter was a bad fat. The idea that a restaurant in the 70's and 80's would use butter to make wing sauce seems unlikely. I've only started using butter within the last 5 years or so. These days, butter is trending and margarine is considered to be a low class product. Margarine has been rejected by the cancel culture. That's the bakes.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-22 10:40:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by odlayo
Post by Dave Smith
Remember... if it is on the internet is must be true. We have some cites
that say butter and some that say margarine. I clearly remember that
people in the know in Buffalo on the 70s insisted on margarine.
As a former Buffalonian I can't argue otherwise; I've long thought Anchor used margarine. I'm not sure precisely why; I guess I just read it repeated often enough years after Buffalo wings hit the big time. But is there any contemporaneous evidence from before 1980 that supports this? I don't put too much stock in things written decades later. I've actually looked into this question a bit and have come up empty. I wouldn't be too surprised if there were sources I'm unaware of.
Are you familiar with Janice Okun, food writer/editor of the Buffalo (Evening) News for some 40 years? She probably knows more about Buffalo's food and its history than anyone, and the '70s and '80s were probably her peak years. When she shared her copycat recipe with the New York Times (likely in 1980 or '81) she guessed the sauce contained butter. If in the 1970s it was common knowledge that Anchor used margarine, I find it somewhat surprising she wouldn't have known about it. But it's certainly possible.
Back when I was a kid - and most of my life, margarine was considered to be a healthy spread and butter was a bad fat. The idea that a restaurant in the 70's and 80's would use butter to make wing sauce seems unlikely. I've only started using butter within the last 5 years or so. These days, butter is trending and margarine is considered to be a low class product. Margarine has been rejected by the cancel culture. That's the bakes.
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.

--Bryan

"I have cooked a lot of wings over the years and they
were much better with margarine than with butter."
-- Dave Smith in rec.food.cooking Sep 21, 2021, 4:58:43 PM
dsi1
2021-09-22 17:09:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant. My guess is that you think that anyone smarter than you is stupid. That's ignorant thinking.
bruce bowser
2021-09-22 17:11:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant.
I don't know anyone who thinks that.
dsi1
2021-09-22 17:21:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant.
I don't know anyone who thinks that.
The idea that Hawaiians eat shitty food is a common belief in rfc. rfc is especially ignorant about food and other cultures.
Cindy Hamilton
2021-09-22 17:55:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by bruce bowser
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant.
I don't know anyone who thinks that.
The idea that Hawaiians eat shitty food is a common belief in rfc. rfc is especially ignorant about food and other cultures.
All we know is what you show us and what you say you like. Starch, gravy,
and precious little in the way of vegetables.

Cindy Hamilton
Bruce 3.3
2021-09-22 19:21:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 10:55:19 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by dsi1
Post by bruce bowser
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant.
I don't know anyone who thinks that.
The idea that Hawaiians eat shitty food is a common belief in rfc. rfc is especially ignorant about food and other cultures.
All we know is what you show us and what you say you like. Starch, gravy,
and precious little in the way of vegetables.
That's absolutely true. I wonder if that's just dsi1's dislike of
vegetables.
dsi1
2021-09-23 00:39:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by bruce bowser
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant.
I don't know anyone who thinks that.
The idea that Hawaiians eat shitty food is a common belief in rfc. rfc is especially ignorant about food and other cultures.
All we know is what you show us and what you say you like. Starch, gravy,
and precious little in the way of vegetables.
Cindy Hamilton
Of course that's all you know - rfc is ignorant about food and other cultures.
Bruce 3.3
2021-09-22 19:20:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 10:09:01 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant. My guess is that you think that anyone smarter than you is stupid. That's ignorant thinking.
So Hawaiians aren't all as afraid of vegetables as you?
dsi1
2021-09-23 00:37:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 10:09:01 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant. My guess is that you think that anyone smarter than you is stupid. That's ignorant thinking.
So Hawaiians aren't all as afraid of vegetables as you?
I love vegetables. I just don't eat salads.
Bruce 3.3
2021-09-23 00:49:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:37:48 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 10:09:01 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant. My guess is that you think that anyone smarter than you is stupid. That's ignorant thinking.
So Hawaiians aren't all as afraid of vegetables as you?
I love vegetables. I just don't eat salads.
That I can understand.
dsi1
2021-09-23 01:05:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:37:48 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 10:09:01 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bryan Simmons
I know you live on a rock where eating shitty food is the norm,
but if you were eating margarine five years ago, you're just stupid.
--Bryan
People that think the Hawaiians eat shitty food are kind of ignorant. My guess is that you think that anyone smarter than you is stupid. That's ignorant thinking.
So Hawaiians aren't all as afraid of vegetables as you?
I love vegetables. I just don't eat salads.
That I can understand.
People put a few leaves of lettuce on their plate and then feel oh-so-superior. That's the rfc way. Here's a cabbage pancake.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/SPZVpBEMtRCrs327A
Bruce 3.3
2021-09-23 03:14:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 18:05:58 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:37:48 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
I love vegetables. I just don't eat salads.
That I can understand.
People put a few leaves of lettuce on their plate and then feel oh-so-superior. That's the rfc way.
Are you sure you're not imagining things now?
Post by dsi1
Here's a cabbage pancake.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/SPZVpBEMtRCrs327A
Cabbage built the Great Wall of China.
dsi1
2021-09-23 04:24:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 18:05:58 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:37:48 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
I love vegetables. I just don't eat salads.
That I can understand.
People put a few leaves of lettuce on their plate and then feel oh-so-superior. That's the rfc way.
Are you sure you're not imagining things now?
Post by dsi1
Here's a cabbage pancake.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/SPZVpBEMtRCrs327A
Cabbage built the Great Wall of China.
I occasionally get a plate that will, inexplicably, have a salad on it. This one's a pastelle plate with a bacalao salad.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/VSjRUrVpKLAo3SPC9
GM
2021-09-23 04:42:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 18:05:58 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
Post by Bruce 3.3
On Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:37:48 -0700 (PDT), dsi1
Post by dsi1
I love vegetables. I just don't eat salads.
That I can understand.
People put a few leaves of lettuce on their plate and then feel oh-so-superior. That's the rfc way.
Are you sure you're not imagining things now?
Post by dsi1
Here's a cabbage pancake.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/SPZVpBEMtRCrs327A
Cabbage built the Great Wall of China.
I occasionally get a plate that will, inexplicably, have a salad on it. This one's a pastelle plate with a bacalao salad.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/VSjRUrVpKLAo3SPC9
Uck...looks like slop that.might be served at a POW camp...
--
GM
Dave Smith
2021-09-22 13:48:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
Post by odlayo
Are you familiar with Janice Okun, food writer/editor of the
Buffalo (Evening) News for some 40 years? She probably knows more
about Buffalo's food and its history than anyone, and the '70s and
'80s were probably her peak years. When she shared her copycat
recipe with the New York Times (likely in 1980 or '81) she guessed
the sauce contained butter. If in the 1970s it was common knowledge
that Anchor used margarine, I find it somewhat surprising she
wouldn't have known about it. But it's certainly possible.
Back when I was a kid - and most of my life, margarine was considered
to be a healthy spread and butter was a bad fat. The idea that a
restaurant in the 70's and 80's would use butter to make wing sauce
seems unlikely.
When I was a kid it was more a matter of economics than health.
Margarine was a lot cheaper than butter. I don't think they worried
much about fat back then.



I've only started using butter within the last 5
Post by dsi1
years or so. These days, butter is trending and margarine is
considered to be a low class product.
My mother tried to foist margarine on us once. My father was a country
boy. His family had had a cow so they had fresh milk and made their own
butter. Margarine just didn't cut it for him.




Margarine has been rejected by
Post by dsi1
the cancel culture. That's the bakes.
Groan
dsi1
2021-09-22 17:16:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by dsi1
Post by odlayo
Are you familiar with Janice Okun, food writer/editor of the
Buffalo (Evening) News for some 40 years? She probably knows more
about Buffalo's food and its history than anyone, and the '70s and
'80s were probably her peak years. When she shared her copycat
recipe with the New York Times (likely in 1980 or '81) she guessed
the sauce contained butter. If in the 1970s it was common knowledge
that Anchor used margarine, I find it somewhat surprising she
wouldn't have known about it. But it's certainly possible.
Back when I was a kid - and most of my life, margarine was considered
to be a healthy spread and butter was a bad fat. The idea that a
restaurant in the 70's and 80's would use butter to make wing sauce
seems unlikely.
When I was a kid it was more a matter of economics than health.
Margarine was a lot cheaper than butter. I don't think they worried
much about fat back then.
I've only started using butter within the last 5
Post by dsi1
years or so. These days, butter is trending and margarine is
considered to be a low class product.
My mother tried to foist margarine on us once. My father was a country
boy. His family had had a cow so they had fresh milk and made their own
butter. Margarine just didn't cut it for him.
Margarine has been rejected by
Post by dsi1
the cancel culture. That's the bakes.
Groan
I can't say how things are in your country but the idea that butter is "healthy" is a relatively new one in America. That's the way it was when I was a kid and young adult. These days the kids think margarine is vile. I don't understand why rfc hates margarine - generationally, they shouldn't.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/06/17/the-generational-battle-of-butter-vs-margarine/
Cindy Hamilton
2021-09-22 17:54:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by dsi1
I can't say how things are in your country but the idea that butter is "healthy"
is a relatively new one in America. That's the way it was when I was a kid and
young adult. These days the kids think margarine is vile. I don't understand
why rfc hates margarine - generationally, they shouldn't.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/06/17/the-generational-battle-of-butter-vs-margarine/
I hate margarine because it tastes awful. Real butter tastes delicious.

"Generationally" is a generalization, which always break down when specific
instances are examined.

Cindy Hamilton
Michael Trew
2021-09-22 04:54:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Dave Smith
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a
bar and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We
went to a lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings
and try to get recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo
where he sold a lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I have made them
myself many times and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
Not according to this and the first page of a Google search. They all
show butter
https://parade.com/26655/anchorbarbuffalony/anchor-bars-buffalo-wings-the-original-hot-wing-recipe/
This authentic Anchor Bar wing recipe calls for margarine/oleo... not
butter.
http://www.cluckbucket.com/original-anchor-bar-wings
Sounds good to me! Nice and simple. I'll have to make that with the
frozen wing pieces in my freezer here soon.. I have an ulcer in my mouth
near a tooth that's driving me crazy. Until that heals, anything spicy
is a hard pass.
Bryan Simmons
2021-09-22 10:38:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Gary
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a
bar and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We
went to a lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings
and try to get recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo
where he sold a lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I have made them
myself many times and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
Not according to this and the first page of a Google search. They all
show butter
https://parade.com/26655/anchorbarbuffalony/anchor-bars-buffalo-wings-the-original-hot-wing-recipe/
This authentic Anchor Bar wing recipe calls for margarine/oleo... not
butter.
http://www.cluckbucket.com/original-anchor-bar-wings
Sounds good to me! Nice and simple. I'll have to make that with the
frozen wing pieces in my freezer here soon.. I have an ulcer in my mouth
near a tooth that's driving me crazy. Until that heals, anything spicy
is a hard pass.
If you want to take wings to the next level, Cholula and butter. Dave
can't have them anyway.

--Bryan

"I have cooked a lot of wings over the years and they
were much better with margarine than with butter."
-- Dave Smith in rec.food.cooking Sep 21, 2021, 4:58:43 PM
Mike Duffy
2021-09-22 13:26:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bryan Simmons
If you want to take wings to the next level, Cholula and butter. Dave
can't have them anyway.
I tried Cholula once. I did use the whole bottle, but there is something
in it that just sets the taste a bit 'off'. All of the ingredients seem
okay, for sure I've encountered Xanthan gum elsewhere.

It must be one of the 'spices'. Their web-site says they use 'an array'
of regional spices.
dsi1
2021-09-21 18:22:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Gary
the produce section of a grocery store.
Post by Dave Smith
They originated at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo and their recipe was
Frank's hot sauce and oleo.
Really? I always thought it was originally real butter.
Nope. Oleo. Back in the late 70s a friend of mine was opening up a bar
and planned to sell wings. They were a novelty at the time. We went to a
lot of bars in Buffalo and Niagara Falls NY to try wings and try to get
recipes. I also knew a guy who owned a bar in Buffalo where he sold a
lot of wings. He insisted on oleo. I have made them myself many times
and I tried butter. They are better with margarine.
Restaurants and bars using margarine instead of butter are pretty common. People at home these days tend to use butter but back in the 70's, margarine was king.
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